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ScottC
21-07-2010, 17:44
Just following on from the thread about cleaning a rifle, it got me thinking about moderators. I may be a bit niave here, but do moderators require any maintenance? I have an ASE Ultra S5 and have checked the information supplied with it and there is no mention of cleaning etc. They must eventually get dirty enough to effect performance or bullet trajectory.

leec6.5
21-07-2010, 18:03
well ive got the ASE northstar , and the only bit of cleaning thats is mentioned is spray with some wd40 inside , and remove from the barrel after shooting and also to keep the thread lightly greased !

and thats from the destructions !

cheers lee

Dalua
25-07-2010, 09:52
I have a Northstar and two T8s. They get WD40 squirted into them, and wiped over with oil on the outside. The threads pick up grease from the rifle.

The .22LR mod is quite another matter. It comes apart, and I strip it every few 100 rounds (usually after a range visit) and de-gunk the insides.

Sloth
30-07-2010, 19:25
I agree with cleaning some moderators but some just dont need it from what ive seen. Those that can be stripped might need some care depending on material I guess that can also be said for non strippable mods too. However if you cant remove the corrosive residue from the surface of the moderator will this not slowly eat away at the unit over time.
I like some stripable mods but I also like the idea of maintanence free after all the time spent shooting is what its about for me and not having to worry if the mod will rust and ive had a few T8s go that way as im sure most have.
So I would say be liberal with cleaning if you cant remove the corrosive reisidue or perhaps your wasting your time or maybe even causing more harm...

finnbear270
30-07-2010, 22:19
Sloth, have you been party to a view of contents from a mod that has been used with .17HMR? (L'IL GUN)

Dan Gliballs
31-07-2010, 00:17
I was always under the impression that WD40 was a BAD thing to use.

WD40 leaves a sticky film when it evaporates, not what you want inside a moderator.

Sloth
31-07-2010, 01:14
Sloth, have you been party to a view of contents from a mod that has been used with .17HMR? (L'IL GUN)

Yeah I've seen the state of .17 hmr mods look a right state for sure.

Rowey
31-07-2010, 07:45
WD40 inside the T8 occasionally as recommemded by Jackson Rifles and a bit of grease on the threads. Never had any bother with mine.

jay 22
19-08-2010, 09:03
wd40 wont hurt the mod a quick spray in the mod will neutralize the stuff left in there from shooting.

this then stops the corrosion

tikkamuz
19-08-2010, 21:27
I have an ASE Northstar mod which gets a squirt of WD40 after use but I was wondering if it would be worth giving it a clean in the ultrasonic cleaner occasionally?

philip
28-08-2010, 01:29
whats the general feeling then guys spray or not to spray

.17 HMR will the moderator benefit from a end of work day spray ! my HMR has seen a few rounds through it - now i'm confused .com should I strip it down or just give it a spray out

Any ideas most welcome

phil

flytie
28-08-2010, 09:25
Spray! But i have a T8!!!!

ft

Les Brooks
29-08-2010, 04:00
Never put grease on ya thread, it encourages moisture, use light oil.
If you want to clean your mod, fill it half full with petrol, keeping your thumb over the hole, give it a really good shake for as long as you can them empty it, leave it to evaporate before you fire it though.
Sound mad, see how much crap comes out.

martinl
29-08-2010, 07:38
Never put grease on ya thread, it encourages moisture,

Never heard this before, why does grease encourage moisture?

barry thom
29-08-2010, 07:47
I was advised to use copperslip on the threads, havnt heard about the moisture atraction bit though.

Dry Powder.

Barry

Les Brooks
29-08-2010, 09:25
Never heard this before, why does grease encourage moisture?Don't know the inns and outs, put a blob of grease on a slab outside and watch it hold water droplets.
Myself and several friends in the early days of mods all had the same problem and all had to get our rifles re-crowned, mainly due to not taking the mod off after shooting, the gun smith told me no grease just light oil on the thread after every outing.

Dawnraider
29-08-2010, 10:01
whats the general feeling then guys spray or not to spray

.17 HMR will the moderator benefit from a end of work day spray ! my HMR has seen a few rounds through it - now i'm confused .com should I strip it down or just give it a spray out

Any ideas most welcome

phil
If you have a stripable mod a good idea with the .17hmr chuck it in the sink and give a good scrub every 50 rounds or so you would't believe the crud that comes out of them,mines got stainless baffles and ally spacers and i uses a pan scourer on them.
Neil.

martinl
29-08-2010, 10:07
Too much grease on any thread will stop the threads fully mating up, this will lead to the thread coming loose and I suppose could leave a gap/path for water to penetrate.

I wouldnt use copperslip, horrible stuff, great for brake pads and other stuff that gets very hot. A little dab of 3 in 1 oil or gun will do the trick.

I have a DM80 mod on my .17hmr , what a pig it is to get to pieces to clean, maybe I SHOULD use copperslip!!!!

Uncle Buck
29-08-2010, 10:57
After every outing i remove Mod always (If fired), A quick spray of Breakfree or WD-40. Next couple of shots will smoke,
but better that than a ROTTEN CAN!.
I then grease thread with Moly Slide or Copper Slip.
( Have done with T8, PES,although currently using an A-TEC have never had any prob's.)
There's nothing worse than a can you cannot remove due to neglect.

Uncle Buck :D

RICK O SHEA
29-08-2010, 16:45
I moved away from putting gun oil on the moderator threads as it seemed to disipate after a dozen or so shots leaving the thread unprotected and if the rifle was put away without removing the mod it was often difficult to unscrew pluss the oil also seemed to atract carbon/residue like a magnet
Try wiping the threads treated with oil after a few shots with a white kitchen towel and you will see it for yourself then try the same using the copper slip and the residue and crud buildup is nowere near as bad.
Try this little test
Fill a bucket with water then apply oil to the threads best use a bolt not your prized rifle then put the bolt in the bucket and watch the oil lift off and float on top of the water ie exposed threads then do the same with mollycote or copper slip i know this is a bit of a extreme example but you get were i am coming from [oil foats on water grease doesnt]
Switching to copper slip a few years back on the advice of a profesional stalker i havent looked back one small blob the size of a match head does the entire thread [avoiding the crown] then the mod is screwed/span back on.
For the t8s i give them a good spray with wd40 using the tube provided every two months then roll the mod horizontaly plus a few good shakes so all the internal surfaces are coated and any junk flushed out [best done outside]
Then a quick spray on the outside and stood up overnight to drain/dry on some kitchen towel then its back onto the rifle avoiding fingerprints finishing off with a neoprene cover for protection.
I have had a t8 on my 25.06 for over nine years and it is in excellent condition averaging about 200 shots a year going threw it.
ATB
RICK O SHEA

csl
29-08-2010, 18:07
I use a thin smear of napier gun grease on the threads which has their VP90 corrosion inhibitor in. All my mods are wildcats and are fully strippable and get a clean fairly regularly too.

As already said, rimfire are worst, especially .17HMR. After 100 rounds my moderator is caked in a horrible gritty residue. I can see non-strippable mods literally filling up over time. Most of the non-strippable mods advocate spraying a light oil which I guess in the absence of being able to strip it is all you can reasonably do. The trouble with nitro powders is that the residue is hygroscopic and absorbs moisture from the atmosphere in addition to the water vapour produced with the actual combustion. The water mixes with the residue and forms a strong ammonia solution which you can smell. This is a relatively strong alkali and will corrode over time if you can't clean it out, especially aluminium alloys.

Alex

Les Brooks
29-08-2010, 18:21
I use a thin smear of napier gun grease on the threads which has their VP90 corrosion inhibitor in. All my mods are wildcats and are fully strippable and get a clean fairly regularly too.

As already said, rimfire are worst, especially .17HMR. After 100 rounds my moderator is caked in a horrible gritty residue. I can see non-strippable mods literally filling up over time. Most of the non-strippable mods advocate spraying a light oil which I guess in the absence of being able to strip it is all you can reasonably do. The trouble with nitro powders is that the residue is hygroscopic and absorbs moisture from the atmosphere in addition to the water vapour produced with the actual combustion. The water mixes with the residue and forms a strong ammonia solution which you can smell. This is a relatively strong alkali and will corrode over time if you can't clean it out, especially aluminium alloys.

AlexI wasn't joking about the petrol, cleans them out lovely

callie
30-08-2010, 00:36
I have a DM80 dedicated for 223 ( a bit larger than the the one martinl has on his 17 hmr ) and I strip and clean after every outing, hot soapy water and a couple stiff nylon bottle brushes, let dry then grease threads AND o-rings this is important and helps when stripping, lastly a squirt of PH 009, contrary to the belief of some forum members it does have inhibitor and I find that it does help combat "sticky" fouling.

callie
30-08-2010, 00:41
almost forgot, let PH 009 evaporate before reassembling mod, just love the smell of PH 009 !!!