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Thread: Approaching Landowners

  1. #1

    Approaching Landowners

    I'd like to start approaching local landowners in the hope of securing some rabbit, fox and eventual deer stalking (hopefully) ground . I dont expect to be given this and am prepared to start from the ground (literally) up.

    Does anyone have any advice/recommendations on the best way to go about this?

  2. #2
    Distinguished Member tartinjock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Nairn, Inverness-shire
    I have posted a couple of letters through letter boxes, but I have had no sucess, I felt this was a better way of approaching it as they don't feel under pressure to give an answer straight away. Very informal letter, but precise in what I could offer.

    Will try another couple of farms around the area in a week or so.

    Good luck, let us know how it goes.


  3. #3
    Ive found well for me any roads has been find problems eg pigeons on rape, rabbits chewing the winter wheat. Chap the door and ask if you can sort the buggers out for the farmer. In the last few months Ive added 300 acres on to 1 of my permissions by knocking the door when the damage was happening and have also managed to secure a new farm for pigeons. Then today caught the farmer doing his rounds checking the lambs stopped asked him how it was going had a chat the dropped in any foxes neede sorted. His reply was yes He pointed me to the ares where theyve been seen then told me there were some roe in 1 corner if I liked!! Be positive straight but these lads arent fools even try and offer labour in return they probably wont take you up on that but they will think they are quids in. This week they are probably 5-10k geese on the 300 acres Ive ran down walked the birds of and I am also looking after his banger for him. I hope they bugger of pronto as they are causing **** loads of damage and we dont want to apply for an out of season license but if needs must!


  4. #4
    It's an awkward one mate. I am lucky enough to live in the middle of it all and grew up with farmers so they know me of old.
    I actually have around 500 acres that I have yet to set foot on, and I have had the land for three months ( I picked that up at a funeral believe it or not)

    Its all about trust at the end of the day, and farmers are bloody neurotic at the best of times.

    Even now years on I am scared that one particular farmer (and friend) will find out about an "incident" I had in a grave yard with one of his sisters some years back and kick me off (well you know what happens when your full of cider)

    Join a cheap syndicate and get in those circles, mix with shooters and maybe join a shooting club, make some contact with other shooters, no matter what form of hunting or shooting they do.
    Go picking up or beating,.. anything!
    Get your face seen, but don't muscle in in anyones shooting, as you will become very unpopular real fast.
    It has happened to people on this site when they tried to help someone.

    I have never had to write letters, but I am not sure that I would go that way. Its easy to bin it, and letters don't show your true character

    Offer professional services in exchange for shooting rights,one of my farmers sons is getting married in May and I am playing his wedding night for him, needless to say there will be stacks of other farmers there that night and I will circulate among them. (not their sisters)

    There is no easy way, its hard to find shooting and bloody eay to lose it.
    (Thats before a syndicate comes along and buys it from under your feet)

    Hope this helps, and good luck

  5. #5
    This is the most difficult part,getting permission, i found that once obtained, word of mouth by the farmer, and subsequent farmers led to more area's.
    Initially try and be in the same area of the farm the landowner will be frequenting, but on the public highway!
    9 times out of 10 they will stop for a chat or ask what you are doing.
    Personally i have never knocked on a door, and i never offer cash.
    Start on bunnies/fox and work up.
    Never turn down an offer, 50 acres could lead to more, i started on a farm with just 120 acres and i now have access to well over 2500 acres.
    Final point, once you have got it, hold on to it and don't take anyone else on the land unless they are very,very close friends and can be trusted.
    Hope this helps

  6. #6

    Approaching landowners

    Wise words from Devon Deer Stalker (see, we're not all like J"B"K down here! I've spent my life working with and around farmers and due to the changing face of the countryside they have, and quite rightly, become very suspicious of people. Also there are some real bloody pains about who will muck up getting permission for others. People who ask to go ferreting and knock bloody great holes in hedges leave gates open etc:
    Then there are those who "cherry pick" at what they are supposed to do and then never come back. Stalking is a case in point, many of us and I was no different when I was young, try to get more and more laaaaand! only to find you never get round to looking after it. This is useless to a farmer. If he has a problem he wants it dealt with, and dealt with properly.
    To obtain ground to shoot, ferret or whatever over is very difficult for newcomers, but once you get you toe in the door you should find more will come your way.
    Get involved in the scene is the best advice, leaflet, door knocking, etc: is unlikely to produce much. Farmers like to deal face to face. The advice to become involved in the local shoot is sound. Keep your eyes and ears open and if you see a problem, rooks, pigeons, rabbits, all the usual suspects, approach someone who you have got to kinow and offer help. It may only be a one off but it is a start.
    Finally, if you do start getting permission look after it, make it clear you are there doing what you offered to do, and don't take on too much. 500 acres looked after well is far better then 1000 where you are hardly ever seen. Good luck.

  7. #7
    You have had some good advice here already.
    Don't waste your time with letters
    Landowners in my experience want to know who you are and where you live,they don't like strangers.Would you let a stranger loose with a gun in your garden?Exactly so look at it from their point of view.
    It's all based on trust.If you are seen to be reliable and honest then more ground could come your way but if your'e not....

    Good luck and never give up,

    Kindest regards,

  8. #8
    Good luck and never give up,
    Never Give up so so true dont let the No's get you down keep on trying and trying even after a time call back to the farm that said no and ask if all is still OK. I have the same senario up here there is a farm with some plantings on, there is a lad on it although he never visits the ground! Ive to back round and see the farmer shortley as he doesnt want damage as that would lead to his grant be cut or stopped. And heres somthing else bud never never try to poach ground from people known to you or perhaps been invited with! If you do and it gets round that youve done well forget anything you will be sin died! Im not saying youve done that but its been known for people to try.

    all the best

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