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Thread: Using a Drone for Laying Artificial Deer Tracks?

  1. #1

    Using a Drone for Laying Artificial Deer Tracks?

    Laying artificial lines for dog training can take some time and the dog may smell your scent as you do it. I use fartenschues and liver tied to a string that I dab on the ground every 10m or so.

    Has anybody tried tying some liver or skin to a string and using a drone on more open fields to lay an artificial drag line? If so how did it go.
    Blaser K95 Stutzen - the ultimate deer stalking rifle

    Blaser R93 - Retired now and probably Moshe Dayan's last choice of hunting rifles.

  2. #2
    SD Regular johngryphon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Victoria Australia Sambar country.
    Well that would take the cake in modernisation in using a drone.
    Why would you drag liver of all things,surely a big sambar tail would be far better or perhaps skinned out Metatarsals?

    I just train my pups on deer no shoes no scent control agents as any dog can differentiate `tween owners pong and the deer scent.
    Having a deer hide or leg hanging in a pups pen works wonders and alleviates any boredom issues also.
    Once pups are in tune with the deer scent (or other target) they figure it out so easily.

    I once dragged a full road kill spikey for 1/2 a mile or more through tussocks, two creek crossings and up and down hill.
    I went home and got the three pups and they were actually wind scenting from the ute tub as I paralleled the drag mark.

    I fair dinkum battled to keep up with them in following them by ute as they literally galloped to the carcase.

    The absolutely best way to train a pup to find a deer is to shoot a deer especially if possible across a gully or stream then take the pup well downwind and head steadily increasing the excitement in your voice along the deer marks..Voila pup 'finds' deer you continually praise etc etc.
    Pup figures its a top day out and wants to do it again to please the boss.

    Drag a deer head along a bush track will do also..theres ways and means.
    Dont dither,take the shot!

  3. #3
    My dog - now 18 months has absolutely no issues in scenting and finding deer. The one thing I do have a slight problem with is stopping her getting too excited about every deer track or deer that we come across whilst we are stalking. We have done a few blood trails which I have laid, but finding a dead one she doesn't seem to have any problems what so-ever. I work her on a lead and am sure that just time in the field will improve her. She is intelligent and being a lab cross with BMH, she has biddability of a lab along with a retrieving instinct, combined with the BMH nose, plus a good level of hound type independence, and germanic snootiness!

  4. #4
    I have not trained my dog to track deer but I have trained them to track other humans and on hard surfaces like tarmac etc. Dogs learn by repetition, association and reward. Repeat, repeat, repeat the training, get the dog to associate the deer scent with it and reward the living daylights out of your dog using whatever method of reward your dog prefers.

    A dogs olfactory ability is so acute that failure to follow a trail in a trained dog is more of a mental / drive issue than a scent issue.


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