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Thread: 50yd Zero

  1. #1

    50yd Zero

    Most likely been covered before but do any of you use a 50yd zero, in this instance using a 40/50gr v-max in .223 (24"varmint barrel, 1-12) pretty impressive trajectory looking at the figures right out to 500yds. There is a slight difference in comparing the tables on the Norma website to say the Leica ballistics tool is this down to different scope measurements?

    Do any of you use the Leica ballistics function on your binos its a shame that if you use the hold over option the zero is only in increments of a 100yds.

  2. #2
    I use these Leica's, once I found what my round was doing using Strelok , you can put all the info into the binos, then if Strelok says lets say 10 clicks for a 300yd target ,if you range find a target at 300 , it will tell you up 10 clicks on the bino's, after playing with the B/C im roughly 1" out at 600yds, its a fantastic system, a bit hard for me to explain .

  3. #3
    Yes just zeroed the 204 40 grain at 50 yards

  4. #4
    yes on a windy day untill it calmed down to zero at 100 or a 22 lr.not sure of any benefits of 50 yard zero for the rifle cals your using ?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by triggersqueezer View Post
    yes on a windy day untill it calmed down to zero at 100 or a 22 lr.not sure of any benefits of 50 yard zero for the rifle cals your using ?

    For a .223 with, say, a 60gr pill with an MV of 3150 fps, zeroing at 50 yds gives you the first point of intersection of line of sight with trajectory, and a true zero (i.e. crossing back through line of sight) at roughly 150 yds. So it's about the same trajectory as zeroing at 150 yds and gives a MPBR of about 200 yds +/- 2 inches. On something like fox, it's cross-hairs on, point and shoot to 200 yds. Personally, I prefer a 200 yds zero with smaller, flatter shooting cals as it allows for a wider MPBR. For the example above, if zeroed to 200 yds, your first zero or crossing line of sight, is at about 38 yds, then 200, with a MPBR of about 230yds, so a more useful zero.

    Personally

  6. #6
    Thanks all.
    Last edited by MartinB; 10-10-2016 at 00:37.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by ChesterP View Post
    For a .223 with, say, a 60gr pill with an MV of 3150 fps, zeroing at 50 yds gives you the first point of intersection of line of sight with trajectory, and a true zero (i.e. crossing back through line of sight) at roughly 150 yds. So it's about the same trajectory as zeroing at 150 yds and gives a MPBR of about 200 yds +/- 2 inches. On something like fox, it's cross-hairs on, point and shoot to 200 yds. Personally, I prefer a 200 yds zero with smaller, flatter shooting cals as it allows for a wider MPBR. For the example above, if zeroed to 200 yds, your first zero or crossing line of sight, is at about 38 yds, then 200, with a MPBR of about 230yds, so a more useful zero.
    Good advice, but this assumes his scope height is the same as yours. Not sure how much difference it'll make though.

  8. #8
    Hornady have a useful ballistics calculator on their website. Height of scope does make quite a difference. 50 yard zero is a useful one as its often easier to find a clear 50 yards into a good backstop for a quick check of zero, either just to confirm things are on, or if you have had a knock etc.

  9. #9
    if you know your trajectory you can zero or check zero at any range tho closer wont show as much error so its always best to check further out occasionally

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by FGYT View Post
    if you know your trajectory you can zero or check zero at any range tho closer wont show as much error so its always best to check further out occasionally
    My first thought.
    There will be a range/distance where the bullet could just touch the line of sight and drop away from it. Nobody seems to mention that, though.

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