Deer cart

#2
Look at carp anglers wheelbarrows. Probably easier to get hold of and will work just as well, also usually use wheelbarrow tyres/wheels so better on soft ground than the thin bike style wheels on the more specific deer carts.
 

deerstalker.308

Well-Known Member
#8
Not what you’re after, and may only suit certain scenarios, but I’m always looking at other “every day” items and thinking if they could be re-purposed. I recently saw one of these on faceache for sale, and could t help think that it would be handy (if I hadn’t already got a quad bike) to be left onsite for moving larger deer....
View attachment 97903 They only want £30 for it..... figured it could easily be modified to accommodate a deer either in or out of a carcass tray
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
#9
Not what you’re after, and may only suit certain scenarios, but I’m always looking at other “every day” items and thinking if they could be re-purposed. I recently saw one of these on faceache for sale, and could t help think that it would be handy (if I hadn’t already got a quad bike) to be left onsite for moving larger deer....
View attachment 97903 They only want £30 for it..... figured it could easily be modified to accommodate a deer either in or out of a carcass tray
Is that a dinghy launching dolly?

I have just used an ordinary garden or builders' wheelbarrow...A big Fallow buck was no problem...especially if you can get someone to tow you with a rope around the front wheel frame if on rough ground or up hill.

I suppose there would be swings and roundabouts as to having a two wheel as opposed to single wheel device on tufty ground.

Alan
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
#14
Might be a bit of a stretch for a decent fallow or wood stag, but could accommodate the pigeon decoyer's gear, if not the doos also!
I was thinking it was a useful concept to build from...the flexible sheet and folding frame to take up less transport space...not necessarily modifying an original.

Built with larger diameter wheel to reduce rolling resistance and a support in front of the wheel to better distribute the carcass weight for instance...

Alan
 
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Tim.243

Well-Known Member
#15
Might be a bit of a stretch for a decent fallow or wood stag, but could accommodate the pigeon decoyer's gear, if not the doos also!
I was thinking it was a useful concept to build from...the flexible sheet and folding frame to take up less transport space...not necessarily modifying an original.


Built with larger diameter wheel to reduce rolling resistance and a support in front of the wheel to better distribute the carcass weight for instance...

Alan
As the son of a builder I have dug out scores of footings, filled the barrow then pushed it around the house run up a Youngman’s board filling large skips all day long then proceed to have the barrow fill by a concrete mixer and fill the footing back up....

Also having witnessed a large number of different work parties (fishing club is a good example) also people turning up a different places of work over the years with the best will in the world most never had the core strength or balance to push a full barrow over a bit of rough ground...

I cant see it being any different with a large Fallow or Red....

Tim.243
 

Alantoo

Well-Known Member
#16
As the son of a builder I have dug out scores of footings, filled the barrow then pushed it around the house run up a Youngman’s board filling large skips all day long then proceed to have the barrow fill by a concrete mixer and fill the footing back up....

Also having witnessed a large number of different work parties (fishing club is a good example) also people turning up a different places of work over the years with the best will in the world most never had the core strength or balance to push a full barrow over a bit of rough ground...

I cant see it being any different with a large Fallow or Red....

Tim.243
I have limited, but actual, experience of shifting carcasses using a wheelbarrow.

As a blacksmith I have handled and shifted heavy weights as a matter of course, but have never thought of myself as being particularly strong.

The biggest carcass I have shifted on wheelbarrow was a mature fallow buck and that was across a tufty paddock...luckily the majority was slightly downhill. The other instances where I could use a wheelbarrow were large and medium fallow does, and they were both uphill out of the wood and across a field and paddock and along a snicket.

Much easier and less effort using a barrow than dragging them though.

And also I found it much easier than pushing a barrow with a Belle-mixer-load of concrete up a scaffold plank when pouring a floor...which I spent a couple of days doing earlier this year.

As I said earlier, traversing rough ground and uphill stuff can be made much easier by someone towing a rope tied in front of the wheel, one person providing the forward movement the other the steering and balance...although I shifted those three carcasses single handed okay.

A two wheel cart would mean you didn't need to balance the load in both directions , but would increase the resistance on rough ground, reducing your chances of picking a smoother route for one wheel, and take up more transport space.

The two wheel dolly mentioned earlier has enabled me single-handed to shift 12metre RSJs and 300kg-ish 6.1metre lengths of 80x80 black solid down a hard stoned surfaced lane on a number of occasions. Quicker and easier on a 4 metre wide lane to go length wise on the dolly than struggle to manoeuvre with the fork lift! I did make a drop on extension frame to the dolly with a raised handle to save bending down when shifting multiple lengths of lighter bars which were too floppy @ 6.1 metres to support themselves clear of the ground at either end. Hence my suggestion that a raised handle might make it easier to mange on rough ground with a carcass.

Alan
 

Tim.243

Well-Known Member
#17
I have limited, but actual, experience of shifting carcasses using a wheelbarrow.

As a blacksmith I have handled and shifted heavy weights as a matter of course, but have never thought of myself as being particularly strong.

The biggest carcass I have shifted on wheelbarrow was a mature fallow buck and that was across a tufty paddock...luckily the majority was slightly downhill. The other instances where I could use a wheelbarrow were large and medium fallow does, and they were both uphill out of the wood and across a field and paddock and along a snicket.

Much easier and less effort using a barrow than dragging them though.

And also I found it much easier than pushing a barrow with a Belle-mixer-load of concrete up a scaffold plank when pouring a floor...which I spent a couple of days doing earlier this year.

As I said earlier, traversing rough ground and uphill stuff can be made much easier by someone towing a rope tied in front of the wheel, one person providing the forward movement the other the steering and balance...although I shifted those three carcasses single handed okay.

A two wheel cart would mean you didn't need to balance the load in both directions , but would increase the resistance on rough ground, reducing your chances of picking a smoother route for one wheel, and take up more transport space.

The two wheel dolly mentioned earlier has enabled me single-handed to shift 12metre RSJs and 300kg-ish 6.1metre lengths of 80x80 black solid down a hard stoned surfaced lane on a number of occasions. Quicker and easier on a 4 metre wide lane to go length wise on the dolly than struggle to manoeuvre with the fork lift! I did make a drop on extension frame to the dolly with a raised handle to save bending down when shifting multiple lengths of lighter bars which were too floppy @ 6.1 metres to support themselves clear of the ground at either end. Hence my suggestion that a raised handle might make it easier to mange on rough ground with a carcass.

Alan
Quite aggree Alan, you like myself will be fine with it....however there would be a > % will be putting it back in the cart more than one time lol


Tim.243
 

Freeforester

Well-Known Member
#18
I was thinking it was a useful concept to build from...the flexible sheet and folding frame to take up less transport space...not necessarily modifying an original.

Built with larger diameter wheel to reduce rolling resistance and a support in front of the wheel to better distribute the carcass weight for instance...

Alan
Agreed, it would be a useful concept, but I got the impression the op was looking for a ready to purchase solution rather than a build your own, which, if time, labour and materials are considered, may make the equally useful carpet dolly type barrow (or better still a "pre-loved" example!) a more cost effective and possibly realistic choice of route for adaptation/modification, it being clearly up to the job of tackling a greater weight . I suppose it will boil down to how much use one hopes or intends it's being used, with the balance being struck between robust build (or at least fitness for initial purpose intended) and outright cost, but if you're time rich (i.e. Rich!) and handy with the pencil, fag packet and welder, then anything is possible - after all, that's how the guys who sell them must start off some way back down the line. It would be interesting to gauge how much demand there is for such a device this side if the pond, though many if not most will already deal with this situation via use of a handy quad, either owned, borrowed from a friendly type or even hired.

I fully agree that not everyone who can muster the strength to squeeze a trigger are quite as able to deal with the consequences!:D
 
#19
I fully agree that not everyone who can muster the strength to squeeze a trigger are quite as able to deal with the consequences!:D
OK, this is so true, but I have taken stags out of area's that even a quad couldn't get to, case in fact when we had the last lot of snow, it took me over 3 hours, but I got it out, on my own, and I'm 58 next month.
Whilst the cart has been a life saver, removing all the guess work from some posters it doesn't sink into the ground, however it can tip over on steep ground which is a PITA.
However, getting one from Cabelas now could be an issue.

Cheers

Richard
 
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Freeforester

Well-Known Member
#20
Quite so Richard, try taking them (left there by another) uphill with only a length of rope to get them to the quad when downhill isn't an option; I was meaning that the quad can get to within a 'reasonable proximity' (a variable concept, I know) of the slain beast, and that there may be some time spent and effort required to be expended between scene of demise and larder hoist!
 

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