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Thread: legality of shots taken at permission boundary

  1. #1

    legality of shots taken at permission boundary

    Given most shots on deer would be expected to exit the animal, is any shot taken on a deer right at the boundary of your permission a bit dubious. I'd expect it's almost certain the round would exit, cross the boundary and land on the neighbouring ground. I'm assuming here that the shot is otherwise safe, i.e. there is a suitable backstop, but thinking of the proverbial situation where the animal is just on the 'right' side of the fence. So, the deer is in the right place but the backstop isn't!

    Cheers,

    Andy

  2. #2
    As you say you expect the round to go through and across the boundary, so you would deliberately firing across you boundary, therefore it would be illegal
    apart from that i have heart shot deer that ran for 100 yards before it realised it was dead, so chances are the deer would cross the boundary and becomes the property of that landowner, so not a shot i would take

  3. #3
    No back stop, no shot

    This DSC1 manual is great you know

    ATB

    Chasey

  4. #4
    Agree with the above post - shots over boundary illegal + deer just a few paces out of your permission cannot be retrieved (let alone a runner.....) - just not worth it but I hear of all sorts happening - I know if it were me though I'd end up right in the proverbial.....
    Dont know about you but I have the contacts of all the landowners and their keepers that bound all my permissions - just in case

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by andyf View Post
    Given most shots on deer would be expected to exit the animal, is any shot taken on a deer right at the boundary of your permission a bit dubious. I'd expect it's almost certain the round would exit, cross the boundary and land on the neighbouring ground. I'm assuming here that the shot is otherwise safe, i.e. there is a suitable backstop, but thinking of the proverbial situation where the animal is just on the 'right' side of the fence. So, the deer is in the right place but the backstop isn't!

    Cheers,

    Andy
    What some people type on here actually worries me some times -: If the bullet is leaving your permission that is not a safe back stop is it? so why would you entertain the shot in the first place? What worries me more is people have to ask these questions, surely it is basic knowledge?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by redlab View Post
    What some people type on here actually worries me some times -: If the bullet is leaving your permission that is not a safe back stop is it? so why would you entertain the shot in the first place? What worries me more is people have to ask these questions, surely it is basic knowledge?
    But I'm not entertaining the shot, am I? I'm asking a question on a forum where (most!) folk gladly offer the benefit of their experience which is almost certainly going to be greater than mine.

    Sorry if I disappointed you with my question but I've just found out it it's going to take 6 months to get my friggin FAC (see above re. experience) so need to fill my time somehow!

    Cheers!

    Andy

  7. #7
    This is a common problem in the urban fringe Andy and I am sure that the deer of many a stalker has made it across boundary or two. If I was to take the opinion of the deer might run a few yards then most of the deer I shoot in the toon would still be causing chaos on the road,s.
    First off a clear back stop on your own ground is needed normally I use the at least a full deer above the deer you shoot.If the deer run on to other ground then you can always ask that person if you can go get it.If you do not know the person then remove the deer and tell the police what has happened offer the deer as a found item should any one fone to claim they own it.Place in your chill for three days after that eat it.

  8. #8
    A number of interesting points in this thread.

    The one that seems clear is that of the deer runs over the boundary whether wounded or 'dead on its feet', you've essentially lost it.

    The less-clear thing is the lawfulness or otherwise of allowing your bullet to leave your ground. My view was hitherto that it is not criminally-unlawful to allow projectiles to leave your ground, unless the projectile is fired from an airgun:
    that it might constitute trespass, for which a civil case could be prosecuted - but is not a criminal offence.

    Could we perhaps see a circumstance where one might take a shot at a deer standing well on one's own ground, but the perfectly-safe backstop to which was on the neighbour's ground?

  9. #9
    Not thinking about the deer running Davie, more the exiting round. Appreciate the risk/likelihood of a runner crossing a boundary in many a situation. But, roads excepted, that's not a safety/legal issue provided you do as you suggest in speaking to owner and/or police before recovering.

    Might well have been a stupid question (although I thought it was fairly obvious I was 90% sure of the answer, so not entirely brain dead I hope...) but there was some background. I was out driving to Carmunnock earlier and started daydreaming about some distant day in the future when I acquire a rifle and some benevolent farmer kindly offered me the right to shoot on his land. I imagined one of the first things to do would be walk the ground and survey what was 'shootable' ground. Struck me that given a round is going to travel a considerable distance on exiting the animal then all the margins of the ground, and to a considerable depth (how far might an exiting round travel? another genuine question, hopefully less stupid!) become a no-shot area unless there is a backstop before the boundary or you use a highseat.

    Actually now I read that back it sounds like I'm not such a risk to public safety after all. I will take off the sack cloth and stop the self-flagellation. Well..... I'll take off the sack cloth at least.

    Cheers,

    Andy

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Dalua View Post
    Could we perhaps see a circumstance where one might take a shot at a deer standing well on one's own ground, but the perfectly-safe backstop to which was on the neighbour's ground?
    That was the real question I cunningly concealed within the stupid question! My instinct said the answer would be no because I thought you'd be falling foul of shooting across/into ground on which you didn't have permission but wasn't entirely sure if that would be the interpretation given it was a round exiting an animal legally shot on your own ground.

    Cheers,

    Andy

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