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Thread: Thermal viewer - calibration. (Pulsar Quantum)

  1. #1

    Thermal viewer - calibration. (Pulsar Quantum)

    Please some advice from other users: I have recently acquired a Thermal Viewer (HD50S) and the manual is less than clear about the various calibration options, when to use which option, and what the advantages/disadvantages and recommended use of the different options are.
    Options: Manual, Semi-automatic or Automatic.
    While I manage to calibrate the unit in each case I am not clear about what gets the best results, assuming a countryside/woodland situation.
    Please may I ask for some practical examples on how people use these units and which calibration option works best for you?
    Thank you.

    For those who are interested: Yes, the unit detects heat-sources at some considerable distance, (The marketing-men claim a man-sized object at 1200 Yards) but obviously there is a relation between distance/size of the object/clarity of the sight picture. Judging distance/size of the object through the viewer is difficult and requires some experience. I look out on a woodland edge, and horses in the boundary field some 500 meters away are clearly picked up, foxes/badgers/small deer show up as a heat source but cannot necessarily be identified*, rabbits/hares/pheasants are just about noticeable. Using the viewer creates temporarily 'blindness' in the viewing eye, and even some disorientation and a slight dizziness. Also, having to deal with sticks, a rifle, bino's and viewer is clumsy, so 'stalking' on your own, using a thermal, is not really working. However I feel the unit will come in its own if you sit in a high seat and have both hands free, or when stalking as a team: One with the rifle/sticks/bino's, the other just using the viewer, taking on the role of a 'pointing dog'. And of course it is great for counts, surveys, tracking a fresh blood trail, finding a carcass or injured deer, or simply used for fun and to film wildlife (An extra piece of kit is required for filming).

    *However, closer in, the definition is quite brilliant, my back garden is some 200 Meters deep and rats/rabbits/foxes/chickens/birds can be clearly identified. An unexpected bonus is that my wife, who is a beekeeper and has some 10 hives in our garden, has found out she can use the thermal viewer to observe activity, size and location of the bee colonies inside the hive. Last night we were playing with the unit in the garden, and carefully homed in on an exiting and promising heat source in the hedge. Until we realised that that is where I had done a wee, 5 min. earlier!
    • Do not be seduced by the marketing-men....

  2. #2
    I use auto calibration all the time.

    I put the rifle on sling crossed over my back. Turn the unit down to its lowest setting to reduce night blindness. In my other hand i carry the primos tripod trigger stick. I have an external power supply in my bino pocket. Note if you pull the supply out the unit turns off.
    Blaser K95 Stutzen - the ultimate deer stalking rifle

  3. #3
    There were a few threads on the nv forum about this, may be worth a search on there ???

  4. #4
    I leave my 38S on full auto and let it get on with it......... when I hear the function click in I stop panning and wait the couple of seconds for it to re-set (helps prevent the momentary dizziness while your brain catches up with your hand).

    But there are others who have theirs on semi-auto and press the calibrate button as and when they feel it needs it.

    At this time of year I usually have mine on the forestry setting switching to the 'eye'dentify as it gets warmer.

    They're definitely a useful and impressive bit of kit, I've learned a lot more about animal behaviour after dark using this sitting waiting for foxes.... especially about foxes! Fascinating. Beats the NV spotters which generally stop at the edge of the wood through the IR reflecting off the trees.... the thermal will go as far as line of sight permits, I wouldn't go as far as the advertising claims cobblers stating they can see 'through' undergrowth, foliage, grass, bracken etc..... you need some sort of LOS to get a reading.

    I was watching a fox at over 350m in Scotland last year sitting behind a clump of wet sedge.... I knew it was there as I'd seen it walk in but I could 'just' about work out that it was sitting and which way it was facing. My mate on the rifle with a Zeiss 6-24x56 was only getting the occasional glint of an eye from the L/Force HID.

    Sitting in one local high seat I can see a clear, defined signature of aircraft going in and out of Luton and I know that's 6 miles to the flightpath (Can't tell if it's Easyjet or Monarch though ) .

    Also useful for tracking your CH pipes under the carpet, heat loss through the roof windows etc and, as you've found, hot spots... or even piles of poo n puddles of pee! My physio borrowed it and could see hot spots from inflamation.

    The more you use it the better it gets as you'll learn to identify what you're actually looking at by the way they move as well as the shape.

    Cheers

    Fizz
    Last edited by fizzbangwhallop; 22-02-2015 at 19:27.

  5. #5
    You could always lend it me for a couple of years, when I have it sussed I'll return it with full instructions.

    How's that for a deal

  6. #6
    Well I been spotting with a 38s for 14+ months, firstly use on auto, turn the brightness down dont use it continuously just sweep and put it down. Put it on a neck strap. Buddy now has it rigged to a portable dvd player, goood image but big drain on batteries so usefull when driving arround/ waiting out. Remarkable bit of kit and watching foxs is a major lesson. Often will sit bolt upright in a field for ages, ? listening. Wish we had one when my CH pipe developed a leak under the lounge floor would have easily spotted it.

    If its too bright, and you use it for too long then you will get a burn out, the vision in my eye takes on a brown hue, also an idea to use it from your non shooting eye. Also would benifit from a closing eye piece cup as the light coming out of the eyepiece is very visible, so carry it with your hand covering the eye piece. Sure foxs soon clock it should it be uncovered.

    Absolutely indispensible for doing roe counts at night easy 900 yds when you know what your looking at.

    D

  7. #7
    As to your comment on depth and distance perception being tricky I can agree with that. I thought I was watching some rabbits jumping frantically about 50-60 metres away but turned out to be a few mice about 6 metres away!

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyres View Post

    If its too bright, and you use it for too long then you will get a burn out, the vision in my eye takes on a brown hue, also an idea to use it from your non shooting eye. Also would benifit from a closing eye piece cup as the light coming out of the eyepiece is very visible, so carry it with your hand covering the eye piece. Sure foxs soon clock it should it be uncovered.

    D
    Just think of all the foxes that have come into a 150 watt lamp. The tiny bit that shows on your face is unlikely to worry them. In fact they are more likely to hear you putting the thermal down and lifting the rifle than heed the light coming from the back of it.
    I can speak in-depth and with great knowledge about most subjects until some bugger who actually knows what he is speaking about opens his gob .

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Cyres View Post
    Well I been spotting with a 38s for 14+ months, firstly use on auto, turn the brightness down dont use it continuously just sweep and put it down. Put it on a neck strap. Buddy now has it rigged to a portable dvd player, goood image but big drain on batteries so usefull when driving arround/ waiting out. Remarkable bit of kit and watching foxs is a major lesson. Often will sit bolt upright in a field for ages, ? listening. Wish we had one when my CH pipe developed a leak under the lounge floor would have easily spotted it.

    If its too bright, and you use it for too long then you will get a burn out, the vision in my eye takes on a brown hue, also an idea to use it from your non shooting eye. Also would benifit from a closing eye piece cup as the light coming out of the eyepiece is very visible, so carry it with your hand covering the eye piece. Sure foxs soon clock it should it be uncovered.

    Absolutely indispensible for doing roe counts at night easy 900 yds when you know what your looking at.

    D
    I just stuck a shuttered pvs14 eye-cup on mine job done.
    Last edited by camo304; 23-02-2015 at 19:52.

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