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Thread: Really basic reloading. Worth it?

  1. #1

    Really basic reloading. Worth it?

    Hi all,
    So it seems to me that reloading is one of the most popular spin off hobbies from stalking. Next to dog training, DIY accessories, and moaning about FLDs.
    For the common man like me who doesn't shoot very much, and hasn't the time, money or range access to test countless combinations is there any benefit to taking up this dark art? Are the gains in performance and accuracy really so marked, and how much development is involved in finding that perfect load? Why aren't factory loads as good?
    If I were to do it, it would have to quickly pay for itself vs the cost of factory ammo, so I'd be using the "hit it with a mallet" reloading tool and some kind of scoop measures, I guess. No fancy machines, expensive scales, etc. (what else would I need?)
    Whilst it would be interesting to have a go and see what I could do, I'd really have to justify to myself that I would gain something over buying factory stuff. If the truth is that I'd need a big cash outlay, easy range access, chronograph, tens of different powder/bullet combinations, etc, etc then that's fine, I'll forget it and keep buying factory. But if I can happily make up a few loads to try and be sure of at least equalling factory accuracy and being cheaper, then I'll get to it!
    I'll be sure to properly research reloading for my calibre if I do decide it's worth a go, of course, but first I need the input of you folks who have the knowledge. Basically - is it worth bothering?
    See my blog for - My kindly sponsored DSC1 course and chart my progress from deer virgin to stalking veteran
    AND my new puppy progress DIARY
    Blog

  2. #2
    You already made the first move!, You showed an interest..... slippery slope ahead!!!
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  3. #3
    One of the big issues with reloading is some make it out to be, as you say a "dark art" which quite simply isn't true if all you are looking for is a more consistant than factory accurate hunting rounds.

    Richard Lee's videos and books display this perfectly and most start with the statement that a round is simply a brass cartridge, primer, powder and bullet, simple as that.

    i agree the dark part can be as light or dark as you choose but a big decider for me was the fact that ammunition built with a 40 lee loader held a shooting frescoes for a long time so it must say something about its quality.

    i would advise anyone starting out to have a look at a lee loader, and read the instructions on it, super simple, and incredibly satisfying when you get a nice tight group.

    total cost will be te loader (40) the primers (5) some
    powder (35) and some bullets (30) and this will rattle out around 100 rounds and obviously that doesn't use all the powder up.


    regards,
    Gixer

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by finnbear270 View Post
    You already made the first move!, You showed an interest..... slippery slope ahead!!!
    It's ok, the wife prohibits me from becoming over enthusiastic about anything she thinks I might end up spending money on
    See my blog for - My kindly sponsored DSC1 course and chart my progress from deer virgin to stalking veteran
    AND my new puppy progress DIARY
    Blog

  5. #5
    I look forward to seeing the responses to this as I'm at the same place & considering pros & cons when I can already get sub 1 moa with factory rounds.

  6. #6
    I reload for both a 308 and a 22/250 using the whack it with mallet method only other thing I've bought was a sett of scales and a powder trickler both guns will shoot into a half inch I can't say if cost wise I'm saving but I do shoot quite a lot and as long as I've components there I'll always have rounds,got to say I also shoot privvi rounds in both guns I pay 15 for 20 and they shoot into less than an inch.if your thinking about it depending on calibre it may be worth checking the Lee loaders that bewsher had for sale that's the ones I use.gd luck Stuart.

  7. #7
    If you've already found a factory round you're happy with, don't shoot much, and your only interest in reloading is to save money:

    Don't start reloading, there's nothing in it for you.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by jthyttin View Post
    If you've already found a factory round you're happy with, don't shoot much, and your only interest in reloading is to save money:

    Don't start reloading, there's nothing in it for you.
    I disagree. If you load a round that supplants a given factory round, then you are never at the whim and will of a supplier. How often to you see posts asking if anyone has seen a box of a given ammo on a shelf? Happens all the time and more often as of late. The Lee Classic is perfect for the casual shooter. No looking for factory ammo: just load and shoot then put the stuff away til next time. With the Lee Classic I can load a round in 1min, 6 seconds when I hit my stride. That's less than a half hour for a box of ammo that is always an arms reach away VS a trip to the store for a box of ammo that may or may not be there when you arrive.~Muir

  9. #9
    As Muir says probably the only reason for you, in your exact circumstances, to reload is continuity of supply. If you have a reliable supply of ammo locally to you then you'd probably be better not to bother with the reloading. You also need to take into account the supply of reloading components - it may be that your favourite ammo is more readily available than the components to reload would be.

    I've found that I can buy factory ammo that will shoot as well as anything I can reload, however, I reload just to ensure that I always have some ammo.

    If you want to improve accuracy then your time and money is much, much better spent with a bit of practise.
    For self catering accommodation on the Isle of Lewis please visit:
    http://www.7south.co.uk/




  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by jthyttin View Post
    If you've already found a factory round you're happy with, don't shoot much, and your only interest in reloading is to save money:

    Don't start reloading, there's nothing in it for you.
    SS. It's a complex topic. In principle you can get away without reloading. If I consider 1984, I fired one shot in the entire year. However I now shoot a little more and practice a bit and compete. Where reloading becomes a necessity for me is if I want to shoot on a formal range or compete in a formal competition with my 260 Rem, or previously my 243 Win, then I need to load up some ammunition with match bullets.

    If I didn't shoot a lot and didn't want to reload, I would probably major on a .308 Win and buy soft points for deer and match ammunition for competitions.

    You may be wondering why I'm mentioning competing? Well, to me it's the only way to see how you measure up against other folk and it's certainly driven a small improvement in my rifle shooting over the last 10-12 years.

    In summary, analyse where you personally want to get to.

    Best regards

    JCS

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