Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 62

Thread: .375 h&h

  1. #1

    .375 h&h

    In Western and Northern Canada, my favourite cartridge for moose and bear is the long established .375 H&H. In a slim and proper bolt action (Mag. 98 or derivative) w/22-24" tube, folding leaf sights, receiver mounted peep and QD variable coming in at around 9-10 lbs., I couldn't think of a better rifle a person could own for this purpose. Ammunition is abundant and it is also a easy cartridge to reload for.

    Some people argue that the .375 H&H is "overkill" for deer and that a .300 WM or .338 WM are better options. Incidentally I have taken game species with all three cartridges and I can say from experience that the .375 H&H created a larger permanent wound channel without the bloodshot and bruised peripheral effects of the higher velocity cartridges. What more, the H&H is one of the slickest feeding bolts I have ever owned. On a M98 or derivative platform it is absolutely reliable, operates at lower pressures and, if need be, can fire lighter weight projectiles and outclass the .300 and .338 WMs.

    However, my rifle is typically zeroed for 275gr or 300gr projectiles. I primarily carry it in grizzly country. In hunting camp, reliability is paramount. Shots are never beyond 300 yards.

    It's too bad many people overlook this cartridge on the mistaken belief that it is "too much" gun, yet they consider the various .30 mags and/or .338 mags as being perfect. If a 225 gr .338 bullet traveling at 2800 fps is considered "ideal" by some people for elk, why would a 275 gr. .375 bullet traveling at 2650 fps be "too much"? Illogical and irrational poppycock from people with little understanding or experience, me thinks.

    I'm not claiming that it is the best one gun solution for everybody. Far cry. My 7x57mm gets much more ground time for antelope, deer and elk. I've taken moose with my 6.5x55, .30-30 and 7x57mm without incident. Not saying the 375 is necessary, just that it is an excellent cartridge for its purpose and is very versatile.

    In a 9-10 lbs rifle w/straight stock and limbsaver, recoil is very manageable, and really no worse than shooting .300 WM. Perceived recoil, I find, is worse in a stoutly loaded .338 WM. In hunting scenarios, its irrelevant.

    Many people argue that the .30-06 is a one gun solution to Canada. I agree to some extent. With 180 gr premium you could hunt anything in NA. Load up 200-220 gr and the bears are fair game. However, If you see the merits in running an intermediate 6.5mm or 7mm, the .375 is the perfect marriage for the largest of game species, and will not be "too much" gun for smaller deer if you have two tags.

    One of the criticisms of the .375 H&H is that it requires a magnum action, which is slightly heavier. I think within the context of the cartridge and its use this is not a problem. Anybody who has shot any medium bore cartridge in a "lightweight" rifle will know what I am talking about.

    There really is no perfect answer when it comes to "which cartridge?". Naturally, this will depend on the individual, their location, hunting style, budget, etc. and they will have to go through a process of elimination to find that ideal. If forced to choose only two cartridges to hunt with for the rest of my life they would be the .275 Rigby/7x57mm and the .375 H&H. And never discount emotional factors. When I am in a chilly fall camp in the heart of grizzly country resting in the wall tent with the wood stove ablaze, nothing gives me a more warm and fuzzy feeling then seeing my pre-64 M70 in 375 H&H perched up against my rucksack.

    Any .375 H&H owners/users here? Share you experiences!

  2. #2
    I have a Model 70 I bought from an estate sale in Africa. I have it for elk but seldom use it though I love the round.~Muir

  3. #3
    I love the .375 H&H. It has to be one of the most inherently accurate rifles ever designed, the easiest to find or work up accurate loads. It is not a short range rifle. It has the trajectory of a .308 Winchester.

    I have owned several along the way, like Goldilocks, trying to find one that is "just right". I hope I have now, in a Sako L61R, first year production. I am almost finished shaping another walnut stock for it, but I love the original one.

    I have owned several pre-64 Winchesters. They were slick, but either the stock did not fit me or the barrel was too long for my tastes. The last one, an Express in gorgeous wood that I bought for a lion hunt, was the best. It was a 2005 production, with NECG sights, 9.25 lbs. I put a Tasco Titan 1.25-4x26 scope in Leupold QRW rings and bases on it and it shot every factory load into small ( for a bullet hole that large) group. It was perfect with a scope, but the stock too straight for the wonderful iron sights. i sold it to a surgeon in New York City for his safari.

    I looked for years for an L61R, bought one, now found another like new. Doesn't that figure?

    The nicest one I ever owned was a square bridge Mauser, built by Kreighoff and scoped by Griffin & Howe. I bought it from an heir who wanted a synthetic stainless rifle and a handgun, and did not know what the Safari Club medallions in the the stock of his grandfather's rifle meant.

    I like the 260 to 270 grain bullets, Accubond, Hornady RN, and Swift. I wish I could find some more 235-gr bullets to load up some milder rounds at about 2,650 fps for practice and for deer.

  4. #4
    Did you put the NECG sites on it? I have a standard M-70 I'd like to dress up with NECG express sight but never got around to checking the hole spacing.~Muir

  5. #5
    No, my Winchester M70 Express, came with the iron sights. It was built in South Carolina, during the transition, form USRAC and GIAT to FN Herstal, so who knows. It came in a shipment along with a Model 70 Fwt .30-06 that had an AAA piece of walnut on it.

    If you want some of these sights, PM, me, as Winchester now uses the Williams sights from the 1964 era. I bought some of the left over sights for the 7x64 I built, for a fraction of what they cost from Recknaler ( the actual manufacturer). A friend built a .375 carbine and put these on it. As my daughter would have said in the 10th grade, "It's da bomb!".

  6. #6
    Hi chaps. Recently picked up a rather nice CZ 550 , I think that it's the safari magnum as it has 200 & 300 yd fold up sights. But I'm happy to stand corrected on this? Yet to hunt with it yet till a few more practice shots with open sights, but on the look out for a red dot sight. Are Tru Glo any good? Will be using Winchester 300g silvertips as I've managed to source them at 30 /20. All advice welcome on this calibre

  7. #7
    For 99% of the time the 9.3x62 is better. It fits in a standard action, requires less powder, less recoil and has great SD bullets. Sure I've shot the 375H&H and the 458 and above, but what is the point. Out to 300 yards the 9.3x62 for most of the game anybody on this forum is likely to hunt its more than adequate. You want to lug a 9lb rifle around these hills for 10 hours, that will get tired quick smart. Better off having a sub 7lb rifle in 9.3.

    Germans got it right about 100 years ago.
    Blaser K95 Stutzen - the ultimate deer stalking rifle

  8. #8
    I'm sorry? I believe we're discussing the .375 h&h. Go and start your own thread!

  9. #9
    Is there any calibre that isn't mentioned in the OP except the 9.3 which I the closest practical equivalent?
    Blaser K95 Stutzen - the ultimate deer stalking rifle

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by mchughcb View Post
    For 99% of the time the 9.3x62 is better. It fits in a standard action, requires less powder, less recoil and has great SD bullets. Sure I've shot the 375H&H and the 458 and above, but what is the point. Out to 300 yards the 9.3x62 for most of the game anybody on this forum is likely to hunt its more than adequate. You want to lug a 9lb rifle around these hills for 10 hours, that will get tired quick smart. Better off having a sub 7lb rifle in 9.3.

    Germans got it right about 100 years ago.
    Your premise is flawed and your data arbitrary--kind of like comparing the .308 to the .30-06.The 9.3x62mm is a beautifully balanced cartridge and does have a lot going for it. However, like Danny stated above this is a thread about the 375 H&H. I would rather discuss the merits of each cartridge on their own terms instead of making this thread into cartridge war. It depends on the application of said cartridge, which depends on the location, terrain, game, laws, etc. Lastly, the .375 HH and .458 WM are very different cartridges.

Similar Threads

  1. Wanted .375 h&h
    By Danny rem mag in forum Firearms
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 19-02-2015, 21:53
  2. *SOLD* one book one caliber 300 & .375 H&H Magnums
    By greenshoots in forum Reloading
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 17-05-2014, 13:40
  3. Wanted .375 h&h
    By deerstalker.308 in forum Firearms
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 16-10-2012, 13:26
  4. 375 h&h
    By N.F.W.M in forum Wild Boar
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 10-11-2011, 17:50
  5. .375 H&H
    By Sam in forum Rifles & Calibres
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 05-09-2008, 08:59

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •