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Thread: De-burring after trimming

  1. #1
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    De-burring after trimming

    Hey folks. I recently put my case trimmer into use for the first time. It's a Hornady model - trimming by hand.

    I successfully trimmed each case to the required length but I was unhappy with the exterior burr. I proceeded to remove the burr with my RCBS tool but I don't think it's doing a great job - the angle on the deburr removal tool is too acute in my opinion. It made me think that maybe I put too much excessive forward pressure on the handle whilst trimming?

    When I trimmed I did a final back turn on the trimmer thinking that would de-burr.

    What have you found when trimming? I'm also wondering whether I should be looking at the Forster trimmer and the 3-in-1 mouth case cutter?

    Thanks, in advance.

    Mark

  2. #2
    get a wilson deburing tool. from reloading solutions. thats what i have

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jay 22 View Post
    get a wilson deburing tool. from reloading solutions. thats what i have
    Not sure what happened to my original post that was started yesterday but thanks to all those who already sent me useful ideas.

    In the end I think the 'Giraud' model is the one I'll go for. Yes it's calibre specific (ie) 222, 22-250, 223 can all be done on the same but .243 win would be another tool. The advantage of the Giraud model is I won't have to buy an additional trimmer. Just get a cordless drill and then sit outside on a fine day and do all those nasty 223's that are waiting to be done.

    I just never though that the burr would be so much after using the trimmer and/or I thought my RCBS hand deburr tool would do the job of a tidy up. Clearly the way to go is a 3-in-1 tool - it's already a painful time consuming operation without making it harder.

    Someone mentioned that it was a good idea to trim every time and that's a fine idea until you're having to do hundreds of rounds fired from a semi-automatic.

    Cheers folks

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by tramblygoat View Post

    Someone mentioned that it was a good idea to trim every time and that's a fine idea until you're having to do hundreds of rounds fired from a semi-automatic.

    Cheers folks
    What are you shooting? I load for AR15 .223 and AR10 308 and trim every loading. It's a pain, and I wish the cases all stayed the came length, but the results justify it. I crimp and can't abide crimping on unequal case lengths. There is just no point to it. But, since i don't shoot these weapons every day, I can take an evening to trim and deburr without hurting my schedule.~Muir

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muir View Post
    What are you shooting? I load for AR15 .223 and AR10 308 and trim every loading. It's a pain, and I wish the cases all stayed the came length, but the results justify it. I crimp and can't abide crimping on unequal case lengths. There is just no point to it. But, since i don't shoot these weapons every day, I can take an evening to trim and deburr without hurting my schedule.~Muir
    Hello Muir, For my 223 I'm shooting a Stag 3TM. AR10 .308 versions are interesting but I couldn't finance the cost of an afternoon at the range with one of them. I don't shoot mine that often but I will fire a couple of hundred when I do go.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by tramblygoat View Post
    Hello Muir, For my 223 I'm shooting a Stag 3TM. AR10 .308 versions are interesting but I couldn't finance the cost of an afternoon at the range with one of them. I don't shoot mine that often but I will fire a couple of hundred when I do go.
    I generally shoot 50 of the AR-10 when I take it out, but then, I do the same with my bolt gun when I practice, too. Likewise the .223's -auto loaders and bolt guns. I use a Forster trimmer. The deburing process is made easier by trimming to the shortest case at each loading. I timed myself measuring 50 cases last night: it took about 6 and a half minute to sort the shortest one to use as a set up case for the trimmer. I end up taking, at most, about .005" and usually it's .002". Don't be afraid to hone an edge on the RCBS tool. All you should be removing it the burr and nothing else. Good luck with combo unit. I bought the Lee and like it but for what I consider an over-chamfer on the inside of the case. Since i flare all my case mouths before seating, this only eats brass unnecessarily.~Muir

  7. #7
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    That's interesting that you flare the mouth for those rounds - I only do that for my 9mm.

    I tend to help the bullet feed in to the bullet seater but sometimes it sits fine on its own. My thing was I had only starting trimming away for the first time and being a bit na´ve I thought the trimmer would leave a clean edge. Now I know this is normal I will have a plan of attack for the next time. I don't mind the time it takes but since I have a lot of other things I should be getting on I must be careful not to drift away into the reloading escape and forget my other chores.

    If I knew what I do now then I would imagine the Forster or the Wilson would be on my reloading table and not the Hornady. I bought the the Hornady single stage press and then the Hornady progressive press - as a direct result of having to do 9mm and 223's

    Appreciate your thoughts though and clearly doing them either time is the best practise.

    Regards, Mark

  8. #8
    I flare the case mouths to ease seating. I like this better than chamfering a deep bevel on the case mouth. I caught on to flaring (for jacketed bullets: I always flare cast bullets ) with 22 Hornet. I noticed that no matter how careful I was the bullet would bulge out the side of the case neck in one spot or another. When i flared the case mouths the bullet seated absolutely straight. At least straight enough to eliminate that bulge. Accuracy was instantly improved. I use the Lee flaring die which imparts a very gentle flare on the case -and I crimp so the flare is removed. I now flare everything.

    In fairness, and in the interest of full disclosure, I was quite proud of finding out this little trick -even thought it was an original thought- until i read a book on reloading for hunting from the 60's where the author stated that for 'finest accuracy' case mouths should be lightly flared before seating the bullet.
    So much for re-inventing the wheel! ~Muir

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