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Thread: Are old school cartridges coming back in vogue?

  1. #1

    Are old school cartridges coming back in vogue?

    I am intrigued that so many people have recently been asking about, .22 hornet, .222, 7x57, 7x64, .257's etc

    Have the sporting fraternity got bored of 20Tac, 1:* twist .223's, 6/6.5x47 and 7mm wildcats?

  2. #2
    Hope so. Passed the test of time should still mean something.

    David.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by bewsher500 View Post
    I am intrigued that so many people have recently been asking about, .22 hornet, .222, 7x57, 7x64, .257's etc

    Have the sporting fraternity got bored of 20Tac, 1:* twist .223's, 6/6.5x47 and 7mm wildcats?
    Did they ever really go away? Swede is pretty old school, as is the 30-'06. Even .308 and .223 Rem aren't that "new school" anymore...
    "He who drags the deer has the last laugh (mainly because he has to get his breath back)"

  4. #4
    I have always had a .303 in the cabinet for stalking.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by buck732 View Post
    I have always had a .303 in the cabinet for stalking.
    Me too , and a 45/70 and a 9.3X57 .

    AB

  6. #6
    I've always had a 30-40 Krag, 30-30 and 303.~Muir

  7. #7
    Well I've just received my first centrefires in 7x57 and the mighty .243 (covering all the bases).
    I never make the same mistake twice.

    I make it five or six times.

    Just to be sure.


  8. #8
    They've never gone out of vogue for secure people who have the capacity to think critically and for themselves...

    Incidentally, I don't own a cartridge that is not over 90 years old.

    I've pared down quite a bit over the last few years and now I have a working battery that consists of the least number of guns which put up a first class performance under all condition in North America and Europe. It just so happens that the so-called old school cartridges are the perfect balance of ballistics, recoil and platform for my style and aesthetic of hunting/stalking.

    The old cartridges are no different than the new ones except that they are often not loaded to modern pressures.. For example, in the same [modern] rifle, loaded to the same pressures, the 7x57mm outperforms the 7mm-08 every time. This becomes even more apparent when you move to bullets 140+ grain. Same goes for .308 vs .30-06, .260 vs 6.5x55, 358 WCF vs .35 Whelen, etc.

    That doesn't make more modern cartridge bad, per se, it is just that many are not necessary and others even have drawbacks compared to some of the older ones they try and duplicate or surpass.

  9. #9
    Yes, the 7x57, 8x57, 6.5x55 Swede, .and .30-06 are about perfect in powder capacity, case geometry and bore. As bullets and powders improved, they just got better and better. And look how many other cartridges are based off the .30-06. The .50 BMG is basically a ..30-06 scaled up by John Browning. The .223 Remington is like a scaled down 8x57. I will give the 7x64 Brenneke its own slot, since it was developed a decade before the .270 Winchester, almost in parallel with the .30-06.

    And most of the other magnums are based off the .375 H&H, another perfect cartridge. It not, they are off the .404 Jeffery. And the short magnums were done by Charles Newton back in the 1920s.

    The main thing you learn from the Old Faithfuls is that you don't need to hot rod them with new powders and wonder bullets. They work splendidly with the bullets that move out of them at about 2,700 to 2,800 fps.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Southern View Post
    Yes, the 7x57, 8x57, 6.5x55 Swede, .and .30-06 are about perfect in powder capacity, case geometry and bore. As bullets and powders improved, they just got better and better. And look how many other cartridges are based off the .30-06. The .50 BMG is basically a ..30-06 scaled up by John Browning. The .223 Remington is like a scaled down 8x57. I will give the 7x64 Brenneke its own slot, since it was developed a decade before the .270 Winchester, almost in parallel with the .30-06.

    And most of the other magnums are based off the .375 H&H, another perfect cartridge. It not, they are off the .404 Jeffery. And the short magnums were done by Charles Newton back in the 1920s.

    The main thing you learn from the Old Faithfuls is that you don't need to hot rod them with new powders and wonder bullets. They work splendidly with the bullets that move out of them at about 2,700 to 2,800 fps.
    Not to mention that they give up nothing to the ultra high velocity rounds at sensible hunting ranges.

    I always laugh when I hear a gun writer tout that the .300 Win Mag is better than a .30-06 because it shoots so much flatter....

    Comparing the two firing identical bullets (180 grain Accubond) full house loads, with a 200 yard zero, at 400 yards, which is my absolute maximum shooting distance on live game and only under the most pressured conditions, the .300 WM is down 19.4" and the .30-06 is down 22.8" for a difference of a whopping 3.4"!!!!! Trajectory is otherwise IDENTICAL.

    If you can hold over 19.4" i'm sure you can gauge the extra 3.4" high.

    At ranges where most shots are taken, bullet selection matters hugely and you can guarantee that you will have excessive meat damage with the high velocity cartridges. They are a compromise IMO, a neither fish nor fowl type tool--many people love them though.
    Last edited by Canadian1; 14-04-2015 at 04:45.

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