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Thread: Fox behaviour

  1. #1

    Fox behaviour

    watching foxs with a thermal has been quite an eye opener (as well as a dimmer as its not good for your night vision).

    We think as foxs as solitary creatures and the concept of pairs in territories but in our case with a large free range chicken unit this does not seem to apply. Over the last months we have observed up to 4 foxs in 20-30 acres, and they get up to all sorts of things, they chase each other about but seems in a playfull manner, they often sit upright and watch and listen for ages.

    For example there was a pair together and then a fox some 100 yds away comes running up and seems to play and then goes away, often a pair gets seperated and one will quickly run up to the other. Their senses are remarkable and they are clearly aware of whats going on around them even on the darkests on nights.

    Its also surprising how a fox can just vanish on what you think is a flat field, they often clamp down in the slightest of hollows.

    Last night it took us probably 1 hour to get a small dog fox after a very protracted game of hide and seek, he was unlucky that I clocked him arround some buildings but he just vanished, we did a circuit and i spotted him again, we ended trailing him down a field between horses until he made a mistke and sat down and looked at us, possibly distracted by the two horses that crossed between us prior to the shot.

    Game over but slightly sad to curtail the life of such a clever animal.

    D

  2. #2
    Agreed - for several months I've been given the run-around by a large dog fox that's been killing chickens on a seemingly industrial scale. Last night, however, I finally outwitted him - I secreted myself behind some plastic-wrapped bales and ran the caller on a series of sounds that he would never have heard before. I started with antelope fawn distress, on the basis that it sounded similar to, but slightly different from all the lambs that were bleating nearby. After that, I tried about five minutes of sage rat growling. Giving it a minute or so of silence, I then ran the kitten distress - at this, the fox appeared out of an adjacent ditch with a look of 'What the hell's that?' about it. As he turned sideways, he took a bullet in the engine room and it was game over. I was delighted to have finally nailed him, but saddened at the same time.

  3. #3
    Quite good to read rather than " the only good fox is dead fox " . Before I get pounced on , I shoot a lot of foxes.

  4. #4
    Foxes have a fairly complex family set up and it's quite common for them to be seen in the company of others from the same family group. It gets a bit touchy at mating time but soon settles down. shooting of course breaks up what is quite a well ordered set up.

  5. #5
    I agree they are a pest and god knows how much damage they are doing on our free range chicken unit we have been shooting approx 2 a week for 3 months, thats a lot of hens going awol. However they are very clever quarry and it can be very challenging even using the best of kit. Two weeks ago we nailed a heavily pregnant vixen which we thought was quite unussual we would normally expect them to be with cubs. We think we have a couple more to get but its an on going battle to keep on top of them.

    D

  6. #6
    Out the other night and heard a horrible commotion coming out of the adjacent wood, the likes of which I've never heard before. Thirty seconds later a full grown badger came running out, closely followed by a fox, who trailed it for about fifty yards, and then had a right go at it. The sound i heard was from the badger. This went on for a minute or two till the badger made cover and the fox went on its way. The badger did not seem to be injured making it any easy target for the fox.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by neil the plumber View Post
    Out the other night and heard a horrible commotion coming out of the adjacent wood, the likes of which I've never heard before. Thirty seconds later a full grown badger came running out, closely followed by a fox, who trailed it for about fifty yards, and then had a right go at it. The sound i heard was from the badger. This went on for a minute or two till the badger made cover and the fox went on its way. The badger did not seem to be injured making it any easy target for the fox.
    That is unusual - normally, the fox would be running from the badger. I can only assume Mr Brock got too close to the cubs and took a hiding for it. We had a fox run in to the caller last night - closely shadowed by a badger (which ran when the fox was shot). Again, I can only assume that Mr Brock had got into the habit of following foxes and stealing their meals - I've not seen it happen before.

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