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Thread: Human equivalent of Nexgard or similar - wouldn't that be useful?

  1. #1

    Human equivalent of Nexgard or similar - wouldn't that be useful?

    ...idle thought whilst I try and re-engage my brain in proper work stuff.....

    I'm currently treating my 2 dogs with Nexgard; given the potential impact of Lyme Disease, increasing awareness of tick presence and (possibly? Discuss...) an increasing tick burden due to changes to both climate and farming practises, wouldn't a human equivalent of the 'once a month tablet' be a surefire winner? Stalkers would clear the shelves I'm sure....and I'm not just thinking this 'cos the chewy beefy chunk that is Nexgard looks appetising....

    Serious question though; obviously dogs aren't humans, and humans aren't dogs - I'll open that door up for the obvious cheap gags about Friday nights in the town of your choice .....but does anyone know if any work is being done on a human 'preventative' measure, rather than the reactive scan/remove regime? Not that one would or should replace the other, but just thinking aloud about another layer of protection and assurance....(perhaps I should just get on with what I'm supposed to be doing......)

    Any boffins fancy getting themselves on Dragons Den? We can discuss my royalties for a wizard idea in due course....

    (And just so there is no confusion: I'm not suggesting, recommending or advocating that anyone eats Nexgard in the name of 'finding out if it works on humans'.... )
    Nothing is worse than having an itch you can never scratch

    "...Nicely just doesn't cut the cheese....." A new twist on management-speak courtesy of a colleague.

  2. #2
    I very rarely picked up any ticks on me when I was regularly treating sheep with spot-on or the equivalent. I also know of a few stalkers and farmers who say the same thing. I am not entirely sure that the side affects of spot-on are any better for you than lymes disease but you can make your own mind up on that one.
    Offer to help your local sheep farmer with dipping this year and find out for yourself!

  3. #3
    One of the drenches I frequently use on deer is a "pour on" containing moxidectin, I usually end up with it all over everything, the crush, tag guns, any tools, my clothes, my hands & arms & have never noticed any negative side effects, I also have considered it a bit of a benefit rather than a problem. We just refer to it as a "self drench" & have a laugh about it.

    Sharkey
    "Men Who Stare at Deer."

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by sharkey View Post
    One of the drenches I frequently use on deer is a "pour on" containing moxidectin, I usually end up with it all over everything, the crush, tag guns, any tools, my clothes, my hands & arms & have never noticed any negative side effects, I also have considered it a bit of a benefit rather than a problem. We just refer to it as a "self drench" & have a laugh about it.

    Sharkey
    Looks like the WHO is ahead of you on that one - Study Comparing Moxidectin And Ivermectin In Subjects With Onchocerca Volvulus Infection - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

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