Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Polygon/Polygonal Barrels

  1. #1

    Polygon/Polygonal Barrels

    Following the topic on cut button rifle barrels. I always read that polygon barrels ( similar to the 5R barrel ???? ) are better than the traditional barrel. In the real world you hardly see them. Hardly any rifle company is offering hunting/stalking rifles with polygon barrels. Looking at Walthers website they only are available in a very limited range of calibres. Why are they used so little?

  2. #2
    Please excuse my ignorance, but is Polygonal rifling similar to the "Whitworth" rifling used in Black powder match rifles back in the 18th century?

    silverfox.

  3. #3
    The Whitworth muzzle loading rifle was a nominal .451 bore. Its rifling had a hexagonal shaped cross section - there were no lands & grooves as such. It shot a close fitting, hexagonal shaped bullet (& very accurately too!). Its close fit of the bullet in the bore required very little upsetting on firing & it sealed the propelling gasses extremely well. It was discontinued because both rifling & bullet manufacture were expensive when compared to conventional land & cut groove barrels.
    Polygonal rifling is more like conventional rifling but with shallower slopes from the grooves up to the bore. It doesn't foul as quickly as common rifling because there are less tight corners for the crud to collect in.
    If you google rifling profiles images you will see plenty of explanatory pictures.

    Ian

  4. #4
    I have an idea how the profile looks like. The 5R profile seems very similar and gets very good writing. Walther make 223/308/30-06 Polygon barrels. Clearly calibres with a match background. Still they do not seem to be very common in use.

  5. #5
    Polygonal rifling is more like conventional rifling but with shallower slopes from the grooves up to the bore.


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	polyrifling01.jpg 
Views:	82 
Size:	18.5 KB 
ID:	57594
    A young man who isn't a socialist hasn't got a heart; an old man who is a socialist hasn't got a head.
    I have summat for sale; here's the M̶i̶d̶w̶a̶y̶ Brownells UK price... effin jokers.
    "The .30-'06 is unstable at close range" - Ahahahahhahh!


  6. #6
    Polygon Barrels are (when cleaned) shiny inside, no rifling to be seen. They can be very accurate however I think the main reason or use for polygon was longer useable life in machine guns. A friend of mine has a 308 with a Lothar Walther Polygon barrel and is very happy even out to longer ranges.
    edi

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Silverfoxfintry View Post
    Please excuse my ignorance, but is Polygonal rifling similar to the "Whitworth" rifling used in Black powder match rifles back in the 18th century?

    silverfox.
    I think you are a century out. Whitworth rifle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Regards JCS

  8. #8
    I have an HK-91 which I bought new in 1979 and came with polygonal rifling. It is a heavier and longer barrel. I did not order it that way. I bought two at the time, the other an A3 with the sliding buttstock, which has conventional rifling. They both are hammer forged, of course. They came with test targets, both sub-MOA, all holes overlapping, and they are, indeed, very accurate.

  9. #9
    I mentioned in the rifling method thread that I use Schneider .308 Match barrels in my TR rifle. I currently have 5 x 5P ( P=Polygon ) Schneider barrels and one conventional 6 groove Schneider barrel. I was unaware that Walther offered polygon barrels and to date the only person I knew that did them was Gary Schneider.
    I can attest to the accuracy of Schneider polygon barrels, otherwise I would not use them! Some years back Schneider barrels were selected by the USMC for use on their day time sniper rifles and David Tubb of American High Power Fame almost exclusively used Schneider polygon barrels in his High Power rifles.
    I have the end off a polygon barrel which I will try and photograph and post. Incidentally, Schneider barrels usually have a small groove machined an inch or so back from where the barrel will be machined off. This groove signifies where the gunsmith should part the muzzle off and machine the crown thereby removing any incidence of introduced muzzle enlargement as the rifling button is withdrawn. All Schneider barrels are button drawn not button pushed.

    I have no affiliation with Schneider Barrels other than I have 6 of them chambered and ready to go and have shot out a further 2 so it is fair to say .... I like Schneider barrels.

    regards
    Mike.

  10. #10
    SD Regular Greener Jim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Yorkshireman in Darkest Cornwall
    Posts
    2,569
    Hopefully their website will be up and running soon. Would love t see what they offer
    Any Questions Feel Free to PM me

Similar Threads

  1. cut or button rifle barrels versus hammer forged barrels
    By swarovski in forum Rifles & Calibres
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 29-11-2016, 22:37
  2. barrels
    By charlie-hunter in forum Cleaning, Gunsmithing and Equipment Care
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 05-07-2013, 10:38
  3. Barrels
    By remmy243 in forum Cleaning, Gunsmithing and Equipment Care
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 14-03-2013, 16:03
  4. For Sale barrels
    By borden in forum Firearms
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 26-06-2012, 22:27
  5. Bi-Pods used with free floated barrels & bedded barrels
    By Brithunter in forum Rifles & Calibres
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 23-03-2010, 22:49

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •