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Thread: steyr ultra light 222 rem

  1. #1

    steyr ultra light 222 rem

    Hi folks! I'm after a little advise regarding a steyr ultra light I have came across in a local dealers. It's had little use and isn't screw cut. That I could get done.the thing that bothers me is that it seems to have a 1:9 twist rate. Reading elsewhere it seems 12/14 is the norm for this calibre. It's my first step into centre fire and wondering will this limit what bullets I could use.I intend to use it for fox and rabbits mostly and maybe a little target out to 250 max.has anyone out there got the above rifle or who could give me their opinion on it or the twist ratio? It's wooden stock so stock flex should not be a problem.many thanks

  2. #2
    my honest advice to you is forget it and keep looking .222 is a lovley caliber but by having it in a 1-9 twist barrel is going to only cause you problems. A 1-9 twist barrel in .222 is done to help stabilise heaveir weight bullets over 50grains which is the norm for .222, and this is where i think your problems are going to start. what you will find is that 99% of factory loaded bullets for the .222 will be mainly 50gr and some will be 40gr which you are going to get problems with trying to stabilise them in a 1-9 twist barrel so basicaly there not going to be acurate so you will find yourself having to reload so with this being as you say your 1st steps into centre fires not only are you going to have to learn a whole new way of shooting with a new rifle but also having to learn how to reload and every thing what goes with it and trust me learning to reload well isnt a half hour job and all its going to do twist your head and put you off. Many people will tell you that there 1-9 twist barrel will shot 50-55grain heads but trust me and i do talk from experience of having fast twist barrels not all of them will and you will end up with a .222 shooting heavy bullets giving you a loopy trajectory which i think isnt what you want from a 1st rifle, dont ditch the .222 its a very good and very accurate caliber but do yourself a favour and stick with a standard twist barrel

  3. #3
    Hi verminshooter29, if you want to know if your bullet will be fine then have a look at a stability calculator, there are quite a few on the net but heres one to try, just put in the variables and it will let you know the facts. Twist Rate Stability Calculator | Berger Bullets
    I have personally found a faster twist will still be fine for the lighter bullets but the rifle may be throated out a little further to accommodate a longer bullet which means it may have a bigger jump before its fired. I still think it will be a deer moa rifle and nothing to worry about if you really like the rifle.
    Atb

  4. #4
    I'm scared of buying a head scratcher. I'd probably prefer a lighter bullet for flatter shooting.too big a gamble if it's not going to be an all rounder. You'd wonder why steyr use a different twist to others?

  5. #5
    its a good guide in theory but it doesn't tie in with real world experience

    I have stabilised bullet weights in twist the guide says were impossible (60gr in 1:14")

    As for a 1:9 twist you should have no problem shooting 40-50gr which is most common in factory loads
    what you also have is a rifle designed for heavier 60gr which IMO is a devastating small deer load

    Tight TurnsGuns Magazine.com | Guns Magazine.com

  6. #6
    Can you ask the dealer to show you a group shot with factory 50 or 55 grain ammo ? If they want a sale I'm sure they will ?

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by verminshooter29 View Post
    I'm scared of buying a head scratcher. I'd probably prefer a lighter bullet for flatter shooting.too big a gamble if it's not going to be an all rounder. You'd wonder why steyr use a different twist to others?

    I've noticed this move in the 'Classic' and 'UltraLite' models which now have 1:9" for both .222 & .223. It's driven by other makers (CZ, Tikka, etc.) switching to faster twists for the .223 which is now the major seller. This makes economic sense as the .222 is now being quietly dropped from the line by most rifle makers. I don't think it'll be on offer at all 5 years from now.

    If you're using flat-based SP bullets from 40 - 63gr then the standard 1:14" twist is fine, and it makes no difference whether it's a .222 or a .22-250. If you're wanting to use long pointy 65gr polymer tips or 69gr-plus MatchKings in these then it won't do, but you've got a different problem to the target-shooters.

    I have no experience of 40-55gr bullets in a faster twist, but obviously their rotational speeds are going to be much higher. The advice you need is what the users of Tikka .223 1: 9" twist think on this score, and after a few years there's now a bigger evidence-base out there. I haven't read any adverse reports, but tbh haven't really been looking. It may be that it's not the problem we perceive it to be, and you end up with the best of both worlds.
    If I'm going to be accused of it then it's just as well I did it.

  8. #8
    Dumpy little 35gr vmax shoot great in my 1-6.5" 223, just about the fastest twist 22 cal barrel you get, with just about the lightest bullets too.

    So, crack on and buy it, it'll be fine
    Sako TRG-42 folder .338LM🔫 Sako TRG-22 .308/.260🔫 Tikka 595 .222(NV'd up) 🔫 AR15 .223/300BLK 🔫Franchi 12g 520 9shot🔫Baikal .410 stealth🔫Ruger #1.243

    Home | Varminting UK

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Sinistral View Post
    I've noticed this move in the 'Classic' and 'UltraLite' models which now have 1:9" for both .222 & .223. It's driven by other makers (CZ, Tikka, etc.) switching to faster twists for the .223 which is now the major seller. This makes economic sense as the .222 is now being quietly dropped from the line by most rifle makers. I don't think it'll be on offer at all 5 years from now.

    If you're using flat-based SP bullets from 40 - 63gr then the standard 1:14" twist is fine, and it makes no difference whether it's a .222 or a .22-250. If you're wanting to use long pointy 65gr polymer tips or 69gr-plus MatchKings in these then it won't do, but you've got a different problem to the target-shooters.

    I have no experience of 40-55gr bullets in a faster twist, but obviously their rotational speeds are going to be much higher. The advice you need is what the users of Tikka .223 1: 9" twist think on this score, and after a few years there's now a bigger evidence-base out there. I haven't read any adverse reports, but tbh haven't really been looking. It may be that it's not the problem we perceive it to be, and you end up with the best of both worlds.
    Of course it'll still be made for a long time yet, .222 is the euro equivalent of .223 in countries where.223/5.56 isn't legal. Rifle manufacturers won't drop the .222 as it's very common outside the UK
    Sako TRG-42 folder .338LM🔫 Sako TRG-22 .308/.260🔫 Tikka 595 .222(NV'd up) 🔫 AR15 .223/300BLK 🔫Franchi 12g 520 9shot🔫Baikal .410 stealth🔫Ruger #1.243

    Home | Varminting UK

  10. #10
    My .223 bolt action is 1:12, and my AR-15s are 1:9. Just to find out, I have shot my bolt action loads in one of the AR-15s, of 50-gr Sierra, and some 45 and even 36-gr factory loads. They shot sub MOA. Now the 55-gr and 62 to 69-gr bullets shoot better in the AR-15, but the light ones are plenty good.

    You can surely find lots of owners of Tikka T3s and Steyrs with 1:9 barrels posting their experiences online, with all kinds of bullets.

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