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Thread: Measure or weigh?

  1. #1

    Measure or weigh?

    Just wondering what the majority of guys do when reloading? I loaded my first batch of .270 the other day & found the H4831 was a bit tricky to accurately measure in the Lee thrower (I've subsequently found out it's a well-known effect of the longer grain sizes) I ended up using the thrower, but then fine-tuning the charge using a trickler onto my digital scales as I found the Lee balance scale took an age to settle. Wouldn't matter f I had ten rounds to reload, but I was doing about a hundred.

    What do you guys prefer to do?
    A Man should be wise, but never too wise. He who does not know his fate in advance is free of care

  2. #2
    I prefer to not load more than 30 at a time, that way I can maintain 100% concentration and not be rushed. I know that was not your question - so in answer to it I would say that for those that reload with dipper and those that weigh neither method it wrong. For my part I use a powder thrower (RCBS) just under my intended weight then trickle the odd tenths onto electronic scales.

    I have heard that the Lee scales can cause issues.

  3. #3
    Apparently they can be susceptible to draughts, but otherwise they're totally reliable?

    That's exactly what I was doing, Peter. I don't think I was off my more than 0.02 grain in any of my loads, and that was purely down to the individual grain sizes. I'm pretty certain 0.02 grains is negligible for my purposes though
    A Man should be wise, but never too wise. He who does not know his fate in advance is free of care

  4. #4
    I hesitate to ask, but what was the variance?~Muir

  5. #5
    Sorry Muir, how do you mean? In the thrower?

    I found the charges could be almost half a grain out. I had it set to 3.49cc to give me the volume for 54 grains. I've read the long grain powders can be a bit tricky for the thrower. Maybe the 4831SC would be a better bet? although, I've also read that shorter grains can change the burn rate, so how the SC and the standard can be said to be exactly the same confuses me a little
    Last edited by Woodsmoke; 10-06-2015 at 09:19.
    A Man should be wise, but never too wise. He who does not know his fate in advance is free of care

  6. #6
    I have only just started reloading. The friend (BillH on here) that was instructing me has some very positive scales Lyman or RCBS I think. I have the Lee scales and found that every time I hooked the dish on it was impossible not too knock the balance beam out of line. Providing I put the magnet damping plate back to be central in its slot they worked accurately when checked against my Oertling Lab. balance scales. In the end I gave up and just used the Lee thrower and trickled to the required charge on the Lab. scales.

    Alan

  7. #7
    I use this to measure each and every load. The beam if knocked does not lose it's zero.
    I zero before loading and check a load every 20 or so against an electronic scales that has 10x the accuracy. Then zero between calibers. It has never lost its accuracy in the 27 years I have had it.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by hybridfiat View Post
    I use this to measure each and every load. The beam if knocked does not lose it's zero.
    I zero before loading and check a load every 20 or so against an electronic scales that has 10x the accuracy. Then zero between calibers. It has never lost its accuracy in the 27 years I have had it.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I don't follow your approach at all. Why use a belt and braces? Why not sell one of the scales? Regards JCS

  9. #9
    The electronics are so slow as to make loading a day long task. My only reason to use them is to ensure I get exactly the right load each and every time. Just a fail safe check in case wear,dust or filings have mucked the scales up.
    If you only load 20 or 30 at a time it isn't an onerous task to weigh each load. I was taught that it was important to achieve a consistent load every time when I started reloading and haven't found any reason to stop.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Woodsmoke View Post
    Sorry Muir, how do you mean? In the thrower?

    I found the charges could be almost half a grain out. I had it set to 3.49cc to give me the volume for 54 grains. I've read the long grain powders can be a bit tricky for the thrower. Maybe the 4831SC would be a better bet? although, I've also read that shorter grains can change the burn rate, so how the SC and the standard can be said to be exactly the same confuses me a little
    Half a grain for 4831 is amply accurate. Tiny variances in neck tension, individual case volume, primers.etc will negate any benefits from weighing each charge in that case with that powder -this meaning for a factory rifle at hunting distances. Don't waste your time weighing out that half grain.... and if the Lee unit is tossing to half a grain, that's damned good. I have a $600 Jones Precision measure that tosses 4350, 4831 to .1 variance when there is any at all. But then, that's a $600 BR measure used by 1000 yards shooters.

    In the grander scheme of things, having powder weighed to an exactitude is of lesser importance than other details.~ Muir
    Last edited by Muir; 10-06-2015 at 12:05.

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