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Thread: Sizing Roe Buck Heads

  1. #1

    Sizing Roe Buck Heads

    Hi has anyone got any tips for sizing medal Roe Buck heads prior to the shot

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by charlie111 View Post
    hi has anyone got any tips for sizing medal roe buck heads prior to the shot
    i think my man , you had better formaly introduce your self in the introduction page , like every body else then the other members including myself might be able to help you !

    Lee

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  3. #3
    Sorry Lee I have now formaly intrduced myself I appologise for my ignorance

  4. #4
    SD Regular willie_gunn's Avatar
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    Charlie

    Richard Prior, in his book Roe Deer: Management and Stalking, suggests the following:

    Skull weight (uncut, less lower jaw): 455g, Possible medal level: Bronze

    Skull weight (uncut, less lower jaw): 510g, Possible medal level: Silver

    Skull weight (uncut, less lower jaw): 540g, Possible medal level: Gold

    To measure the volume you have to suspend the head from a spring balance and measure the weight in grams.

    If the skull has already been cut, the respective weights are; 365g, 420g and 450g

    Hope this helps, and please post some pictures of the heads you're measuring.

    willie_gunn
    Last edited by willie_gunn; 19-04-2010 at 21:07.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by willie_gunn View Post
    Charlie

    Richard Prior, in his book Roe Deer: Management and Stalking, suggests the following:

    Skull weight (uncut, less lower jaw): 455g, Possible medal level: Bronze

    Skull weight (uncut, less lower jaw): 510g, Possible medal level: Silver

    Skull weight (uncut, less lower jaw): 540g, Possible medal level: Gold

    To measure the volume you have to suspend the head from a spring balance and measure the weight in grams.

    If the skull has already been cut, the respective weights are; 365g, 420g and 450g

    Hope this helps, and please post some pictures of the heads you're measuring.

    willie_gunn
    Willie your figures are correct, but that is after the drying out period, I find that an uncut and newly cleaned head needs to be around 500 grams to make bronze, drying out will loose 10%+ sometimes considerably more, then 90 grams deducted for uncut head, there are exceptions of course as volume is more important than overall weight.

    However I tend to use the 500 grams figure as to whether I would measure a head or not, unless there was something exceptional about the head.

    As to Charlie 111 question about assessing a medal head prior to the shot, I couldn't young from old yes! good head from bad head yes! but medal status no sorry.

  6. #6
    SD Regular willie_gunn's Avatar
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    bogtrotter

    You're quite right of course - apologies if there was any misunderstanding.

    Although I did attend one the courses with Richard Prior and Dominic Griffith I'm no great judge of medal heads. For a rough and ready guide I tend to compare them to heads of known quantity, but I've only got roe and muntjac.

    The only yardstick I tend to use on a roe buck before it's shot is to try to compare antler length to ear length. Everything looks bigger when in velvet, but once out anything more than double the ear length is likely to be a good buck - note, good, not necessarily medal. I've not found antler length to be infallible when it comes to judging age, however, body conformation (at least IMHO) being a better indicator.

    willie_gunn

  7. #7

  8. #8
    If the reason that you need to assess whether they have antlers that will score high enough to gain a medal is for commercial purposes then my only advice is to try and gear your pricing structure in such a way as to make this less important. There is nothing worse or more distasteful than having a whispered discussion about how much a buck is going to cost whilst the guest has the rifle up. I can tell you this from plenty of experience. Several times I have deliberately, but discretely, spoilt an opportunity in order to get out of this situation. If the guest does not want to shoot a medal buck then this should be made clear before the stalk begins. If he does want to shoot a medal buck then thats fine. JC

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by JC275 View Post
    If the reason that you need to assess whether they have antlers that will score high enough to gain a medal is for commercial purposes then my only advice is to try and gear your pricing structure in such a way as to make this less important. There is nothing worse or more distasteful than having a whispered discussion about how much a buck is going to cost whilst the guest has the rifle up. I can tell you this from plenty of experience. Several times I have deliberately, but discretely, spoilt an opportunity in order to get out of this situation. If the guest does not want to shoot a medal buck then this should be made clear before the stalk begins. If he does want to shoot a medal buck then thats fine. JC
    I would agree with that.

  10. #10
    I would just like to say to start off with, i do not shoot alot of medal class deer.
    I think it's incredibly hard to assess bucks ' on the hoof ' unless you can get a good close up look, and how many medal class bucks stand about and let you do that....!
    I saw this buck in January his head was, i estimated fully grown at this point and as he ran off i saw him from the back and could see that he looked thick, but they always do in velvet but none the less a good buck.
    I then saw him again clean a couple of weeks ago from 200m, he looked a nice mature looking six pointer, but thats as much as i could say, he had been fraying willows and had a lot of bark stuck in his head, and was with a yearling buck and doe, so body wise he looked big as well.I didn't shoot him as he was on the opposite side of sheep netting fence and didn't want to risk a richochet.
    On the night i shot him it was just on last light and he was 150m at first i didn't think it was the same buck as his head didn't look that good but didn't believe he would have allowed a smaller clean buck in his territory,but as he was in the company again of the yearling buck and doe assumed it must have been him.
    My point being i saw him three different times and assessed his head differently each time and at no time would i have said he was definately a medal.
    Thankfully my first impressions of him in velvet were good as his head cleaned off weighed 660g after boiling and is now sitting at 570g after a week, a hopeful gold.

    Moose
    Last edited by moose; 20-04-2010 at 15:35.

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