Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Roe Buck

  1. #1

    Roe Buck

    I was out for a stalk on Saturday night with a mate. He shot this big boy, easy score medal. Watched him mount Doe three times prior. Nice to see that a buck I shot two year ago (scored Bronze) on the same piece of ground had similar head, so I would like to say great grandson. Hopefully the genes go on



    Buck from Saturday Night


    Buck from two year ago
    Last edited by Von; 04-08-2015 at 09:40.

  2. #2
    Well done very nice looking roe

  3. #3

  4. #4

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Von View Post
    Hopefully the genes go on
    Well if you had let him live another couple of weeks I'm sure that they would have done. As it is, you may have just killed that very gene pool that you're so keen to keep going

  6. #6
    SD Regular willie_gunn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Oxfordshire, Wiltshire, Berkshire....and Sutherland
    Posts
    7,000
    View my Gallery (19)View my Gallery (19)
    Quote Originally Posted by baguio View Post
    Well if you had let him live another couple of weeks I'm sure that they would have done. As it is, you may have just killed that very gene pool that you're so keen to keep going
    I somehow doubt it - this chap has obviously been around for a few years, so doubtless his progeny are already active in the gene pool.

    I also think that nutrition has a lot more to do with antler development than genetics, but that's obviously a personal perspective on things.

    The truth is that none of us know for sure....
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us to see oursels as ithers see us!

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by willie_gunn View Post
    I somehow doubt it ....
    I doubt it too willie but you know what I'm saying. If you want to preserve genes (which this trophy hunter obviously does) then you don't cull your best bucks until after the rut!

  8. #8
    SD Regular willie_gunn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Oxfordshire, Wiltshire, Berkshire....and Sutherland
    Posts
    7,000
    View my Gallery (19)View my Gallery (19)
    Quote Originally Posted by baguio View Post
    I doubt it too willie but you know what I'm saying. If you want to preserve genes (which this trophy hunter obviously does) then you don't cull your best bucks until after the rut!
    I agree that leaving the best bucks until after the rut will maximise their chance of breeding success, but I also happen to be one of those stalkers who feels that nutrition is more important than genetics when it comes to antler formation and development. Roe deer are polygamous, so even if we leave a "master" buck in the hope that it will pass on its genes, there's always a chance that some scrawny yearling will grab an opportunity to have his wicked way in the meantime.

    The evidence seems vague on the exact role genetics play, and much of the theory seems based more on tradition, accepted practice and hearsay rather than scientific fact. I'd be happy to be proven wrong if someone can point me towards peer-reviewed evidence to the contrary?

    I sometimes feel we treat our deer as though they were captive thoroughbreds, believing that we can carefully manipulate the population to maximise their trophy potential. I think a lot of the time we are simply kidding ourselves, as we have no idea what's going on for the 99.99% of the time we are not on the ground.

    That said, I admire those stalkers who do show restraint until after the rut. Personally I think the rut is the most exciting time of the year when it comes to roe stalking, giving us a two or three week opportunity to catch up with the sly old bucks who normally hide themselves in the deepest, darkest, corners of the country. If we take advantage of that opportunity we have no idea whether the buck in our sights has passed on his genes or not, so the decision to squeeze the trigger rests with the individual stalker, but there's a good chance we may not get the opportunity again.

    Hoffman pyramids and age-based cull plans aside, our policy is to shoot a set number of bucks each season. Basically if there are bucks left to cull, any that walk in front of the rifle match those criteria. By ignoring any grand plan based on culling yearlings, middle aged bucks, or those that are in their prime, the ground seems to keep producing some notable heads each season. Maybe we are just lucky, or maybe our tinkering with genetic manipulation has little relevance to wild deer population and trophy production. So long as stalkers are actively managing the deer on their ground - rather than just shooting any and all deer that they see - I can't see that it makes a lot of difference what culling policy they pursue.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us to see oursels as ithers see us!

  9. #9
    So long as stalkers are actively managing the deer on their ground - rather than just shooting any and all deer that they see - I can't see that it makes a lot of difference what culling policy they pursue.[/QUOTE]

    Baguio this part of Willie Gunns last reply really does it for me, then again I'm nothing but a trophy hunter.

  10. #10
    A would say the area the deer are from has more to do with head size rather than there gene pull . Look at the amount of medal heads that come from the Kingdom of fife and surrounding areas compared to the likes of the Scottish Borders ?

Similar Threads

  1. Tips on Roe Buck calling (Nordik Roe)
    By DeerStalker Brent in forum Videos
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 22-09-2015, 16:24
  2. Another cull buck, and I thought my Roe Buck season was over
    By sikamalc in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-09-2014, 20:30
  3. Swap Roe buck for munty buck
    By russ91 in forum Deer Stalking Opportunities
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-06-2013, 18:20
  4. Swap Munty buck for Roe Buck Hampshire
    By 243Sako in forum Deer Stalking Opportunities
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 29-05-2012, 18:24
  5. Roe Buck or Fallow Buck
    By dieseldan in forum Deer Stalking Opportunities
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-07-2009, 12:16

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •