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Thread: Removeable Turret Press - Drill or Clamp or Freeze

  1. #1

    Removeable Turret Press - Drill or Clamp or Freeze

    Bumbling my way through starting reloading. Decided to get a well engineered turret press, mainly so all my dies are in one place.

    All cleaning, priming and trimming will be done in the comfort of my study. However having a bit of a dilemna over where to put the press (of unknown make as of yet, put an in the classifieds).

    I have three choices:

    1) drill my garage workbench and install a press there. No issues with damage, but no heating and will get very nippy when it is -10.

    2) drill my study desk and install a press there. Permanent damage to reclaimed wood expensive furniture. Not funny at all, but press will be secure and warm.

    3) Secure press to wooden boards and hold in place via carpenters clamps on study desk. No damage to desk but possibly more movement when full length resizing.

    What is the wisest option? Probably do a maximum of 200 rounds per year.

  2. #2
    No3, works for me.
    decent clamps like proper G clamps work a treat and if you are only making 200 a year you can tuck it out of the way for the 99% of the time that you don't need it.
    I screwed a piece square section timber on the front edge underside of the timber base to provide a nice solid contact point at the front edge of the desk/kitchen table and put clamp at rear of press. I put the press near the right hand edge of the desk so the clamp comes in from the side.

  3. #3
    As you are not loading a large number of rounds per annum, why go to the expense of a turret press?. A single stage press is much cheaper and, if you buy quality, more accurate. Changing dies is no big problem.
    However, to answer your post, I'd like to add to the options outlined above, so may I suggest that you consider bolting the press, of whatever flavour, to a suitable lump of wood and use one of those portable workbenches to clamp it. B&D Workmate springs to mind. The press plus its lump of wood can be kept somewhere dry and warm, to prevent rust, and the Workmate folded and kept in your garage. Easy-peasy.
    A few other points:
    The amount of effort required for resizing can sometimes be high and you might wish to consider whether your desk can withstand such forces.
    Not a good idea to have steel/cast iron equipment in unheated places, rust will soon set in. It is recommended that workshops housing precision and steel/cast iron equipment should be kept at about 13-15C in order to keep rust at bay. I would not recommend Option 1.
    You could buy a Wamadet, if you can find one. This is a single stage press on a flat wooden base and only needs a flat table, cramps are not needed. I've had mine since the early '70's and it's still going strong.
    Hope that this may be of interest
    Peter

  4. #4
    cant find an image of mine but I have a press mounted in a MDF box,,, bit like this


  5. #5
    not the best picture but gives you an idea
    sits under a worktop out the way
    means I can reload on any table or counter or workbench in any room or shed


  6. #6
    Thanks for tips Gents. Should explain my desks are large, maybe 1.8m long, 90cm deep and the timber is 70mm thick on top. Very heavy and stable, but means I could only clamp on the forward left or right corner. The rear edge of the board would always be unclamped, if you follow my drift.

    PeteL: You are right, a precision engineering instrument in a garage 10 miles from a ski centre is bad idea. Therefore option 1 is gone.
    I have just googled wadamet. It looks a feasible solution and a single action would be fine for me really, just wondering how it compares in terms of engineering and quality to the RCBS Summit?

    Druid: Could you recommend some decent C clamps? I assume don't use the proper cast iron ones due to marking?

    Bewsher: Do you get any movement in your MDF box when you give the lever a good pull? It is a good idea, just assumed that you would need to clamp down as well or have some form of lashing?

    I am glad there are 3 decent decisions that do not involve drilling my desk.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by lambic View Post
    I could only clamp on the forward left or right corner. The rear edge of the board would always be unclamped, if you follow my drift.
    This would not be good. When resizing, on downstroke the rear of the board would have a tendency to go up, it'd be best to clamp the rear part. On upstroke, the force is much less. Maybe you can make the board full 90+ cm and clamp in forward and rear part, would your desk allow this?

    Myself I'd be tempted to go for separate table/bench. It's funny how small and light the bench can be, if design is right. My friend has a bench like this and some years ago we used it a lot while processing a few thousand brass at a time (kind of serial work).

    Frankford Arsenal Portable Reloading Stand

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by lambic View Post

    Bewsher: Do you get any movement in your MDF box when you give the lever a good pull? It is a good idea, just assumed that you would need to clamp down as well or have some form of lashing?

    I am glad there are 3 decent decisions that do not involve drilling my desk.
    the front lower lip extends right out to the handle at full drop.
    means there is little or no lift.
    its heavy but I just hold the back edge or top of the press if I get a sticky case

  9. #9
    There is no comparison between a Wamadet and the usual presses. The Wamadet was invented and built by a top-class Engineer in the UK and is a quality piece of kit. The mere fact that I've had my Wamadet almost 40 years and loaded goodness knows how many rounds and it's still as precise as it was when new, demonstrates its quality.I dare say that there are presses from America, say, which may be as good but they cost a very great deal of money.
    The Summit press is over $200 in US so that will be, I guess, 250 in UK. How much a used Wamadet goes for these days, I have no idea.
    The point is, do you wish to lay out what is likely to be a large sum for a new precision press for just 200 rounds?.
    Peter

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by jthyttin View Post
    This would not be good. When resizing, on downstroke the rear of the board would have a tendency to go up, it'd be best to clamp the rear part. On upstroke, the force is much less. Maybe you can make the board full 90+ cm and clamp in forward and rear part, would your desk allow this?
    Very good point - board would need to be fully depth of desk.


    That Frankford Stand is interesting, is it stable ?
    Last edited by lambic; 17-09-2015 at 22:30.

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