Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 53

Thread: Tikka/Sako or other?

  1. #1

    Tikka/Sako or other?

    I know that both come under the Beretta ownership umbrella, but is there really a lot of difference between the two brands at say entry-level these days?

    I may have another slot coming up in .308 which will be used for stalking and target (I know..Jack of all trades!) and was going to look at a used Sako (75 Varmint or similar) but had a look at an A7 Roughtec at my local RFDs. For a heavy rifle, it was also very nicely balanced and even with a mod and low profile scope wouldn't overly top the scales as a stalking rifle, perhaps coming out at 11 to 11.5 lbs all in (not what you'd want hill stalking but ok for woodland stalking). Heavy barrel (I prefer heavier barrelled rifles), bedded Ali-chassis stock, nice action, good trigger. Around the 1100 mark. Looked at a new T3, and I know they're popular but it didn't do a lot for me as it didn't feel as nicely balanced, it felt cheaper finished plus the extra expense of optilocs would raise the price to almost A7 levels anyway in the varmint model.

    I would prefer to buy used European but one model from over the pond also piqued interest. Savage have brought out a "UK spec" model 16 "varmint" which looks ok and is on the radar but for that price, a really good used European model might be the better bet.

    Has anyone any experience of ownership and use of the Roughtec or Savage model 16? I have plenty of feedback on the Tikka which by all accounts is a decent enough rifle albeit one where there are rough edges associated with budget. They're the sort of thing that would niggle with me after a while though and as mentioned, I didn't like the balance.

  2. #2
    It sounds as though you've already decided against the Tikka,so you've already narrowed it down,although the number of T3s sold,speaks for itself
    . I've never used either of the other 2 mentioned,but Sako seem are very well thought of,I have a hankering for a 75 myself,so that would be my advice,especially if you've already handled one and like the feel of it. Also,I would be wary of buying a Savage,I don't know about this model,but some also have the reputation of being a little rough around the edges and possibly need some work on the trigger,something that is rarely.if ever ,said about the Sako.
    Good luck with whichever you choose.

  3. #3
    Stay well away from the A7, nothing but grief, sent mine back in the end as the mounting screws kept working loose.no matter what. And this is not an isolated case. If you search the forum on the A7 the discussion is well documented. In the end I went for a Tikka in 308 as a stop gap until something "better" came along, in terms of accuracy can't fault it.


    bryn

  4. #4
    Tikkas are rough? Not likely. I have 4 of them and they are better finished them most Savages or Remingtons. Tikka and SAKO use the same barrel. According to SAKO there is no difference in barrel blanks used and fit to their respective actions. I'd say get a Tikka and put the extra money into good glass, reloading gear, etc.

    Next month i'm going to be winter hunting in some rugged mountain territory, far from any pavement. I'll have my infallible Tikka 7-08 on my shoulder.~Muir

  5. #5
    Wouldn't have a savage
    Seen 2 that had the holes for bases in top of action drilled & tapped out of line to an extent that to zero a scope it was right at the end of its clicks in one direction and still 3/4" off zero

    Heard of others same too.... Now for a company that size to have that QC is not on

  6. #6
    Thanks for the feedback guys, appreciated.

    Well that's the Savage crossed off the list. The model 16 Varmint had piqued my interest but a little digging and it isn't hard to start finding "issues" reported from owners. I have spoken to a few owners of the Browning X-bolt and they unreservedly love them, so as I want to buy once, and buy wisely, I will look into those as well.

    After speaking with a few owners, having the opportunity to handle a few more, and receiving LOTs of feedback about teething issues with the Roughtecs, the Tikka T3 seems to get the most praise and I can overlook the plastic bits and bobs and concentrate on what it seems to do best does best, which is shoot well, so wont discount it at all. Far from it in fact. The feedback on the A7 is that some have had issues with rounds not ejecting properly, mounting screws coming lose, and in some cases, loctiting them not solving the issue, chocolate mounts (alloy) so need binning and decent steel ones fitted, plus a few other gripes. It may be entry level, but it sure isn't cheap financially! It's off the list.

    One thing that appeals about the T3 is its popularity means plenty of after-market bits and bobs, including quality KRG stocks which are lightweight (stalking) and make for a cracking target stock too. A good used Sako model 75, if one comes up, would be worth a look at too.

    Thanks again to those who've responded. I'll update when I make a decision but have been biding my time for a few months now, and just want to look and handle as many as I can. One thing I've learnt, is that it's much easier with a larger budget but at around the 1000 mark, new, it is more of an ask, but there are more happier T3 owners out there it seems than just about anything else at the budget. There's a reason for that.

  7. #7
    Hi,

    i have both tikka varmint and Sako varmint rifles.

    which would I choose... the Sako hands down, better quality by far. Which shoots better... neither they are both ragged hole shooters. Is the Sako worth the extra, most definitely.

    The main let down on the tikka for me is the action and stock, the stock has a very mass produced hollow feel to it, far inferior to my cheap CZ hmr synthetic stock. The action is sloppy, and one size so big on smaller shells, as a tool it's spot on.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by foxyrich View Post
    Hi,

    i have both tikka varmint and Sako varmint rifles.

    which would I choose... the Sako hands down, better quality by far. Which shoots better... neither they are both ragged hole shooters. Is the Sako worth the extra, most definitely.

    The main let down on the tikka for me is the action and stock, the stock has a very mass produced hollow feel to it, far inferior to my cheap CZ hmr synthetic stock. The action is sloppy, and one size so big on smaller shells, as a tool it's spot on.
    Sloppy? Sloppy?? Like.... Ruger sloppy? Or Remington sloppy? Mauser 98 (CZ, BRNO, BSA, Parker Hale) sloppy???
    I don't think you've been all the way around the shooting block if you think a Tikka is "sloppy".~Muir

  9. #9
    In response to post #7 I'll be visiting RFDs stocking both so will have a very close look, but T3s can be re-stocked easily enough if the stock isn't to personal liking. Whilst I prefer a classic wooden stock, practicality and use for my purposes means synthetic or laminated of some variety might be more practical.

    It's funny but for every one opinion on the A7 which denigrates it, there's another which praises it (assuming foxyrich you have the A7 or was it the 85 varmint?). My experience is limited with those rifles as I haven't shot one so I only have the experience of owners to guide me, that and handling the things. My first choice of rifle is way outside my price range, and in this case, I want to buy new, not used, as it'll get as much target use as stalking (probably more in truth), so I'm sort of limited to the usual suspects. I think, personally, that Remy's and Howas are a bit over priced, and that Tikka and Sako (new) at around a grand are obviously compromised, but have better actions and barrels than the other contenders. If it was stalking only, I'd probably buy a Bergara B14, but it isn't so that really only leaves me with limited choice of Tikka, Sako and maybe one or two others (Steyr perhaps).

    Maybe the way to look at it is to ask what needs to be done to remedy the A7 and T3 budget cutting issues (the ones that matter most), and if the answer is that it's something easily remedied in both cases, then the choice is down to handling as they both ought to shoot well.

  10. #10
    The Tikka stock is lightweight because it is thin and hollow, being molded of a stronger, stiffer copolymer than most solid nylon stocks. If the hollow sound on the butt stock is a problem, stuffing in a piece of foam rubber will solve that. If the recoil pad is too hard for you, a pre-fit Limbsaver will reduce felt recoil in half - and you have still not spent much. The biggest problem with the Tikka in the UK is that the price is twice that in the USA.

    Steyr Prohunters right now are on sale for about $700 in the USA. They are a heavier rifle, and a lot of it is in the action and stock, but the barrels and triggers are very good, and they shoot very well.

Similar Threads

  1. Swap sako for tikka
    By bobjs in forum Optics
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-02-2014, 23:28
  2. *SOLD* sako for tikka
    By bobjs in forum Optics
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-02-2014, 14:46
  3. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-01-2014, 18:04
  4. tikka v sako
    By bongo in forum Rifles & Calibres
    Replies: 38
    Last Post: 09-11-2012, 18:47
  5. Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11-07-2012, 10:54

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •