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Thread: Range finding Reticles - smaller Targets

  1. #1

    Range finding Reticles - smaller Targets

    Hi lads

    Ive been looking at the Meopta Scopes and really like the scopes quality and those rangefinding reticles like the 4A and 4B seem to be very handy, Now this will come across as been a silly question to the Pro's here but im only learning about mags of scopes etc so bare with me.So the thing is can these type of range finding reticles be used for smaller targets like fox and rabbits or are they measured just for a Deer. If so is there other Reticles regardless of Brand that Have these quick range Reticles for smaller Targets (fox - rabbits) .

    Thanks in Advance

  2. #2
    If you're only just getting into it I don't think you'll find range-finding on a scope easy. If you know how big the target is (not easy for starters) then you can 'measure' the size in your scope. This can then be cross referenced to determine the range.... Except it only works at specific magnification setting, or where the scope design is such that the reticle is in the first focal plane. Another way of saying it gets bigger as you zoom in. Much better to use a range finder if that can work for the shooting you're going to do.

  3. #3
    Depends on the reticle.
    A simple duplex crosshair reticle (thick to thin in the centre) may be set up to range on one deer species and is useless for all else.
    A mildot/radian reticle in a 1st focal plane will range at all zoom settings.
    A 2nd focal plane scope will only range at one setting (my Zeiss 6.5-20 ranges at 12x exactly).
    For these milradian ranging scopes you MUST know the average dimensions of the target.
    For example, the average kangaroo is 200mm from the tip of it's ears to the line of its jaw. So if 100mm is covered by 1 milradian at 100m a roo whose ToE to LoJ is delineated by 2 millines or mildots it is 100m away. If it is 1 mildot to mildot it is 200m away and then all the variations thereof.
    The formula isClick image for larger version. 

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    • D = distance to target in meters
    • S = actual size of target in millimeters
    • mil = the observed angle of view of target measured in Mil-dots

  4. #4
    Now here is an alternative: Get a sample of what you shoot at. Set it up at exactly 100m or 100yds which ever you feel comfortable with. Then look through the scope and see what the target or selected part of the target is transected by.
    Use this to estimate how far the target is away in the field.
    I use this with the company rifle that has to be used by shooters not trained in range estimation and who only have access to a duplex scope.
    The head of the average roo is transected by half the fine crosshairs at 100m there fore if the head fits twice between them it is 200m away etc....
    Rough but it works.
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	62570Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by hybridfiat; 26-10-2015 at 04:49.

  5. #5
    To make life easy, buy a rangefinder and get a scope that has a good ballistic drop compensation reticle.
    The Zeiss has both as I use it to range at 12x and the BDC underneath is correct for my .223 loads at 13.5x.
    A ranging device is only good if you have time to use it.
    Most hunters don't so my deer rifle is sighted using the 'Mid range trajectory' method.
    I know that a deer has a killing area of around 200mm when hit by my .35 Whelen. So the scope is set so the maximum rise is 75mm above the centre of aim and at approximately 240m it has fallen 75mm below the centre of aim. So from the muzzle to 240m (which is a very long way to shoot a deer in NZ bush) I just aim dead centre of the target area. Notice that this is a 150mm range, however given that I wobble a bit and my rifle is not benchrest accurate I allow 25mm above and below for error.

  6. #6
    The Meopta range finding reticle works on the basis of the target being 50cm from top to bottom. i.e. a roe buck from top of its head to base of chest, but then a sitting fox is probably also 50cm, where as a rabbit is probably 20 to 30 cm.

    All duplex type scope are ranging finding - you just need to compare the reticle against a known size at a known distance.



  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Night Bandit View Post
    Hi lads

    Ive been looking at the Meopta Scopes and really like the scopes quality and those rangefinding reticles like the 4A and 4B seem to be very handy, Now this will come across as been a silly question to the Pro's here but im only learning about mags of scopes etc so bare with me.So the thing is can these type of range finding reticles be used for smaller targets like fox and rabbits or are they measured just for a Deer. If so is there other Reticles regardless of Brand that Have these quick range Reticles for smaller Targets (fox - rabbits) .

    Thanks in Advance
    Range finding reticles are only the answer when an electronic range finder is not available. For live quarry use the best technology available - either a standalone range finder or binocs with range finder built in. Leica make some excellent kit.

    Regards

    JCS

  8. #8
    I had a squizz through a Bushnell Yardage Pro scope a while back but when compared side by side with a similarly priced Vortex Viper; the clarity was very poor.
    I have not compared the Nikon version.

  9. #9
    A scope with mil radian dots on the horizontal, or half-mil hashes even better, will let you range squirrels, rabbits, crows and foxes very easily.

    Couple that with a BDC reticle on the lower vertical stadia or ballistics turrets for your cartridge, like the Burris MTAC, and you have rangefinding, bullet drop and windage offsets in a neat package.

    Just get a cheap Mil Dot scope like a Hawke or Tasco World Class, put it on your .22 and try it out. At 9x, one mil = 4 inches / 4cm at 100 meters. You can use it for holdover, too - just shoot at a variety of ranges and record the range for each dot with your ammo of choice.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by jcampbellsmith View Post
    Range finding reticles are only the answer when an electronic range finder is not available. For live quarry use the best technology available - either a standalone range finder or binocs with range finder built in. Leica make some excellent kit.

    Regards

    JCS
    ^^^^This.

    The newer Bushnell ARC 1 Mile LRF binos work fairly well IME. You'll need more than a .5 mil has mark to accurately range something small like a hare or rabbit at any significant distance...there are some reticles out today that do have .1 mil hash marks (usually on the far sides or bottom) for more accurate milling at longer ranges, but they come with a cost. As JCS says, just use a LRF...

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