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Thread: "Zeroing" high

  1. #1

    "Zeroing" high

    Firstly apologies to the poster, whose comment on another thread prompted this question - I am genuinely intrigued by this concept and didn't want to hi-jack his thread.

    The post talks about having his rifle "zeroed" to shoot 1" high at 100m. Surely "Zeroing" high is not Zeroing at all? If a set up is Zeroed it means that the bullet hits dead on the aim point at the chosen distance.

    May be the way my brain works but I see no point in "zeroing high" at say 100m and then having to aim off at 100m!! Why not Zero bang on at your choosen range and then aim off is your target is substantially closer or further away?

  2. #2
    You are spot on! (No pun intended)

    Zero at 100 yds and known ballistics for me.
    Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not using it in a fruit salad.

    Amateurs practice until they get it right. Professionals practice until they never get it wrong.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by slider View Post
    Firstly apologies to the poster, whose comment on another thread prompted this question - I am genuinely intrigued by this concept and didn't want to hi-jack his thread.

    The post talks about having his rifle "zeroed" to shoot 1" high at 100 yards. Surely "Zeroing" high is not Zeroing at all? If a set up is Zeroed it means that the bullet hits dead on the aim point at the chosen distance.

    May be the way my brain works but I see no point in "zeroing high" at say 100m and then having to aim off at 100m!! Why not Zero bang on at your choosen range and then aim off is your target is substantially closer or further away?
    You've clearly not been paying attention so far and missed a number of important points.


    1. MPBR.
    2. Shoot the deer, don't think about aiming off.
    3. We are not target shooting.
    4. Don't mix metric and imperial measurements.


    to name but four. I was given this 'zeroing' instruction in the late 1960's and it's worked very well since then.

    Regards

    JCS
    Last edited by jcampbellsmith; 26-10-2015 at 21:40. Reason: 4 added.

  4. #4
    I think 100yds (or possibly metres) is a good easily accessible distance to use as a benchmark for 'zeroing' high or dead on etc.

    I prefer the concept of a maximum point blank range for a certain target size, so would rather zero my rifle at about 200m (1" high at 100m) and know that I can aim dead on right out to 250m and know that I should be able to hit a 4" target (not taking into account my shooting or the accuracy of rifle).

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by takbok View Post
    I think 100yds (or possibly metres) is a good easily accessible distance to use as a benchmark for 'zeroing' high or dead on etc.

    I prefer the concept of a maximum point blank range for a certain target size, so would rather zero my rifle at about 200m (1" high at 100m) and know that I can aim dead on right out to 250m and know that I should be able to hit a 4" target (not taking into account my shooting or the accuracy of rifle).
    This +1
    Nooooooooooooobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!! Our main weapon is.........

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by takbok View Post
    I think 100yds (or possibly metres) is a good easily accessible distance to use as a benchmark for 'zeroing' high or dead on etc.

    I prefer the concept of a maximum point blank range for a certain target size, so would rather zero my rifle at about 200m (1" high at 100m) and know that I can aim dead on right out to 250m and know that I should be able to hit a 4" target (not taking into account my shooting or the accuracy of rifle).
    i totally understand this rationale (and the wider range it gives you where you dont have to think about adjustment) but i dont adopt it personally.

    Genuine question - what calibre/round do you use that gives you a 1inch differential between 100 and 200 yards?

    I zero all my rifles at 100 yards but know i have a 2 to 3 inch drop at 200 and a negligable drop (about 1 inch) up to 150.

    cheers W.

  7. #7
    Its a 270 Win. 110gr @ 3450fps. POI verified at 100 & 200m. Yet to shoot at 300m but expect 4-5" drop with 200m zero?

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by slider View Post
    The post talks about having his rifle "zeroed" to shoot 1" high at 100m. Surely "Zeroing" high is not Zeroing at all? If a set up is Zeroed it means that the bullet hits dead on the aim point at the chosen distance.
    It depends what you think 'zeroing' means. It might be a idea to ask your FLD, as they use the term on FAC - but on the whole my view is that zeroing means setting your sights to 'zero'. You can do this with some 'scopes, I think. I have two on which I can set the turrets to zero, and they're both set to zero with the POI 1" above the POA at 100yds.

    Quote Originally Posted by slider View Post
    May be the way my brain works but I see no point in "zeroing high" at say 100m and then having to aim off at 100m!! Why not Zero bang on at your choosen range and then aim off is your target is substantially closer or further away?
    My zero with those two rifles (.223 and .22-250) is 1" high at 100yds. I don't have to aim off at 100yds, because on nothing that I'm going to shoot with them would an impact 1" above POA be problematic. Likewise, a POI 1-2" low is unlikely to be a problem either. Therefore it's point'n'shoot to 200yds - which for me is a good maximum lamping range. If the target is substantially closer than 200yds I can still hold on. If it is substantially further away than 200yds I don't shoot.

    Same idea with stalking rifles, although I usually set the sights (or 'zero') those so that the POI is 2" above POA at 100yds. Bigger target, you see.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by slider View Post
    Firstly apologies to the poster, whose comment on another thread prompted this question - I am genuinely intrigued by this concept and didn't want to hi-jack his thread.

    The post talks about having his rifle "zeroed" to shoot 1" high at 100m. Surely "Zeroing" high is not Zeroing at all? If a set up is Zeroed it means that the bullet hits dead on the aim point at the chosen distance.

    May be the way my brain works but I see no point in "zeroing high" at say 100m and then having to aim off at 100m!! Why not Zero bang on at your choosen range and then aim off is your target is substantially closer or further away?
    Replace the word zero with set and it will make more sense..the term zero is an industry standard word meaning starting point.. That's all...

    if if you can zero or set your scope to shoot 1" high at 100 yds it will enable you to point and shoot at your quarry out to a pre known max range, depending on the ballistic performance of your cartridge, without having to think about anything or adjust anything...

    zero is just a word

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by slider View Post
    Firstly apologies to the poster, whose comment on another thread prompted this question - I am genuinely intrigued by this concept and didn't want to hi-jack his thread.

    The post talks about having his rifle "zeroed" to shoot 1" high at 100m. Surely "Zeroing" high is not Zeroing at all? If a set up is Zeroed it means that the bullet hits dead on the aim point at the chosen distance.

    May be the way my brain works but I see no point in "zeroing high" at say 100m and then having to aim off at 100m!! Why not Zero bang on at your choosen range and then aim off is your target is substantially closer or further away?
    The idea is that you are trying to find the best combination of bullet trajectory and line of sight to give you the maximum point blank range.

    You are actually zeroing at 165-200m depending on your particular cartridge/bullet trajectory.

    So that is "bang on at your chosen range".

    The trajectory of the most stalking rifles means that with a zero of between 165 - 200m the bullet will pass 100m at about 1" high.

    Most commercial ranges are 100m and so setting to 1" high is easier than building a 165 - 200m range.

    The 1" high at 100m means that the bullet is 1" or less away from the line of sight from 25m out to 200m -ish for most stalking rifle trajectories.

    If you zero at 100m the bullet trajectory is almost always below the line of sight and your maximum point blank range is reduced dramatically.

    Alan

    p.s. Just realised that you may have been thinking in terms of target shooting at fixed and known ranges…my post was based on the assumption that you were stalking, and likely to come upon deer at random ranges. Alan
    Last edited by Alantoo; 27-10-2015 at 09:12.

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