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Thread: Chicken wire

  1. #1

    Chicken wire

    My landlord has given me the OK to fence off a bit of my garden for some chickens (happy days).

    because the garden is already fenced all round with a nice high close board fence I only need about 6m of chicken wire and to keep the height I'd like to use 1.8m wire. The problem is I can only find rolls that come in 25m for about 40. The lower heights, such as 900mm come in 10m rolls and are a lot cheaper but would obviously involve more work joining two together.

    Does anyone know of where I can buy the 1.8m rolls but in a 10m length? Or is there anyone in East Sussex who has a decent off cut they be willing to sell?

    thanks

  2. #2

  3. #3
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    Hello. If you cut the feathers on one wing they won't be able to get that high. Bantams might however! It isn't really necessary to bury the fence as deep as for a pheasant pen (six to eight inches deep will do) but...and here's why I've posted...if you do that two, or three, rows of wire make sense.

    The one part buried will rot first. So will need replacing first. But the top layesr being above ground won't. So when the time comes you don't have to replace all the whole height of the fence just the decayed bottom half.

    So making a benefit out of a feature I'd stick with you 90cm width rolls and joining them together. In the long term it will be cheaper and as long as it is well wired together (say every six inches) will be no less secure than a 1.8 metre width. Hope it helps. One last thing...if you haven't already got rats you will...

    Three 10 metre rolls of 90 cm will also be easier to transport, easier to handle and you'll have 2 metres left over to make a door that height and 90 cm wide. Good luck! Will you do a three year rotation on the birds with red, white, blue leg bands?

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by JTO View Post
    I may be being a bit dim but I can't find any on their site that's 1.8m high!

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by nun_hunter View Post
    I may be being a bit dim but I can't find any on their site that's 1.8m high!

    You said it, not me.

  6. #6
    Good call regarding the buried part rotting first as I hadn't really thought of that but as its rented accommodation I had hoped we'd be moving and buying somewhere within 5 years so would have to take it all down anyway!

    whilst I agree they won't be likely to get up that high with their wings clipped (plus the run will only be 6m x2m so they won't have much room for any kind of flight) I have a dog and all the gardens surrounding mine have dogs too so if one did get out it wouldn't last long I fear.

    I think it may be worth the extra effort to join two shorter sections to get the height I want for the pay off for cheaper wire and easier transport costs etc.

    Also I hadn't got as far as the rotation thinking (or much beyond the "ooh I'm finally getting chickens" part) so if you could elaborate then I'd be much obliged.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by JTO View Post
    You said it, not me.
    Stupid iPad and using the "app setting" rather than the desktop view. I can clearly see the drop down menu regarding heights now!

  8. #8
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    The rotation is that chickens are most productive in their first three years of life. If you buy POL (point of lay) birds.

    So you use three bands. Red, white, blue. Or three different at least. First year's birds red leg rings. Second year's birds white leg rings, third year's birds blue leg rings.

    In the fourth year kill all with red leg rings, buy new replacement birds put the red leg rings on them. Fifth year kill the white leg ring birds, buy new replacement birds put the white rings on them and so on.

    That way, well in theory, you won't be feeding birds that are no longer fully productive. They'll still lay, that's sure. But the return won't be as good. Also a three year bird is still just about edible as a boiling fowl.

    Or...just get different colour birds each year! Suffolks, Rhode Island Reds, and etc.

  9. #9
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    With the wire, if you forsee a dog problem, then like a pheasant pen go deep. Maybe one foot above ground and two feet under the ground. But you bury the bottom bit partly vertical but mostly flat. So that a digging dog or fox can't dig under as it is trying to dig down vertically through horizontally laid wire. Like a "L" shape as it were with the bottom of the "L" being buried. Dogs and foxes dig down right next to the fence. The flat bit of the "L" thwarts them wickedly!
    Last edited by enfieldspares; 03-12-2015 at 23:00.

  10. #10
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    6m x 2m is really eight chickens at the most. Or ten at a real stretch. But they'll scratch and want some area that they'll dig out as a dust bath.

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