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Thread: Level 1 Shooting Test

  1. #1

    Level 1 Shooting Test

    Evening gents,

    Iím after a bit of advice regarding sitting my DSC Level 1.

    Now, as far as the theory section goes, I am getting on well.
    For the last 6 weeks Iíve been putting in the hours daily with the BDS manual, scouring this site & others for help with the deer identification test, battering through the Deerquest CD every 2nd day & doing all the available questions etc, so my knowledge & confidence is gaining a bit .

    Iím probably doing things arse for elbow by trying to get my DSC1 first, then applying for the FAC, but thatís the route I want to take - Get the basic theory/DSC1 - apply for the FAC - and if successful get the rifle - then get to know the rifle on a range way before I go after my first deer.

    However, due to the nature of my job (working overseas for weeks at a time), getting the time suitable for both my mentor and I to meet up for some basic range practice is a nightmare and with his workload at the monet It's not going to happen any time soon.

    So, having limited exposure to centre fire rifles (I only use shotguns) Iím thinking Iíll have to delay taking the Level 1 until I have as much rifle practice as possible.

    Another addition to the equation is that I will have to use the ďestate rifleĒ option for the shooting section too.

    So, realistically, and considering my limited exposure, have I really a snowballs chance in hell trying to do the shooting element of the test with a) an unfamiliar estate rifle, & b) little shooting practice?

    Maybe I should explain this to the course leader and possibly get some range time in before taking the course??

    I know in an ideal world I should just wait until whenever I get enough shooting under my belt, but I just wanted to put it to you guys to see what you think?

    (I've probably answered my own question here haven't I !! )

    I know people have taken the DSC1 with almost no previous experience and passed using the ďestateĒ rifle but I donít think Iím neither that good nor lucky.

    Anyway, Iíd appreciate your thoughts

    Cheers

    Rb

  2. #2
    I can tell you now that using the estate or instructors rifle is no disadvantage whatsoever, in fact it can be a positive advantage. The senior instructor or RCO wants you to pass, his rifle will be zeroed correctly, he will have enough ammo, you are unlikely to be allowed to fanny aroung taking bipods on and off etc. A bit of range time to practice would be good but not essential. My top tips for the DSC1 shooting test are as follows:

    As soon as you are ready, step forward, get it over with before the next ten firers make an arse of it and you are still stood waiting in line.

    Sort your admin out, what I mean by this is have your ear defenders ready, if its wet or dewy put your waterproofs on, you don't need your binos so don't have them round your neck, turn your phone off ect.

    If you have a choice, take an end lane, 50% less chance of cross lane fireing.

    Do not worry about what everyone else is doing, listen to the RCO's intructions and comply with them quickly and confidently.

    Don't worry about the grouping or the prone shots at the buck, if the rifle is correctly zeroed, these are money in the bank.

    Sitting (forget kneeling) is where most people cock it up, practise your position at home, even with a brush or shotgun. In this position, the weapon must point naturally at the target, if it doesn't, shuffle round until it does, try to get both elbows supported, don't over aim - if the reticule is hovering around on the target area, release the shot. Take the same point of aim as for prone, forget the difference in range. Use sticks for additional support.

    Standing, use double or triple sticks. Definetly don't over aim - if the reticule is hovering around on the target area, release the shot. Take the same point of aim as for prone, forget the difference in range.

    Lastly, enjoy the experience.

    By the way, are you sure that the DeerQuest CD that you are using is up to date? Any query on this contact DMQ. www.dmq.org.uk

    Best wishes, JC

  3. #3
    As someone who has been involved in B.D.S assesments I would say yes you could pass with an unfamiliar rifle, but no if you have never shot a rifle before.
    You could gain experience of the positional shooting and shooting from sticks by using an air rifle. Getting used to recoil would not come too hard to someone who already shoots shotgun.
    If you are a member and can get along to a range day there will almost certainly be someone who would help a novice especially if you cover the cost of ammo'. If you let the person arranging the day know in advance then it could almost be guaranteed.
    Failing that, find a local gun club and become a probationary member and you will get plenty of help and advice.
    I find the logic of the way you are doing things to be without fault and hope you achieve your results with plenty of fun along the way. Shooting mates are always the best ones. Good luck.

  4. #4
    Rigboot - good advice already given. Don't panic and just soak up the 'informal instruction' you will be given on the grouping/zeroing stage of the test.

    Have you got a date/venue booked? Maybe someone from here will be in attendance and can walk you through it?

  5. #5
    firstly,
    JC LLD have hit the nail on the head well done.
    secondly,
    dont be scared or nervous.
    I done my only last year and to be honest the rco team i had where exceptionally professional (Dave Goffin and team).
    your team will also be professional. they will lead you through the course stage by stage. they will brief you on what to do. they will not allow you to make an error or balls it up. the estate rifle will be zeroed for you to pass. enjoy your day, have your kit ready as Jc says you will be sorted.... dont delay. take deep breaths.

    once there, you will see the pros with all the (good kit), massive scopes bipods home loads etc etc balls it up anyway
    ha ha so i wish you luck.
    a person with some lack in confidence on the range listens better takes more time and normally is a better student and gets good results. that's from 4 years been on ranges.. you will be ok

    let us know how it goes

    f.

    good luck.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by JC275 View Post
    I can tell you now that using the estate or instructors rifle is no disadvantage whatsoever, in fact it can be a positive advantage. The senior instructor or RCO wants you to pass, his rifle will be zeroed correctly, he will have enough ammo, you are unlikely to be allowed to fanny aroung taking bipods on and off etc. A bit of range time to practice would be good but not essential. My top tips for the DSC1 shooting test are as follows:

    As soon as you are ready, step forward, get it over with before the next ten firers make an arse of it and you are still stood waiting in line.

    Sort your admin out, what I mean by this is have your ear defenders ready, if its wet or dewy put your waterproofs on, you don't need your binos so don't have them round your neck, turn your phone off ect.

    If you have a choice, take an end lane, 50% less chance of cross lane fireing.

    Do not worry about what everyone else is doing, listen to the RCO's intructions and comply with them quickly and confidently.

    Don't worry about the grouping or the prone shots at the buck, if the rifle is correctly zeroed, these are money in the bank.

    Sitting (forget kneeling) is where most people cock it up, practise your position at home, even with a brush or shotgun. In this position, the weapon must point naturally at the target, if it doesn't, shuffle round until it does, try to get both elbows supported, don't over aim - if the reticule is hovering around on the target area, release the shot. Take the same point of aim as for prone, forget the difference in range. Use sticks for additional support.

    Standing, use double or triple sticks. Definetly don't over aim - if the reticule is hovering around on the target area, release the shot. Take the same point of aim as for prone, forget the difference in range.

    Lastly, enjoy the experience.

    By the way, are you sure that the DeerQuest CD that you are using is up to date? Any query on this contact DMQ. www.dmq.org.uk

    Best wishes, JC
    Jc,

    Many thanks for the reply.

    Great positive advice here which I’ll heed in preparation for the test.

    With regards to the “estate rifle I mentioned, I was more concerned with not knowing the rifle at all rather than the zeroing issue. However, you have put forward a very valid point re: correctly zeroed and maybe it’s not outwith my capability after a bit of “fannying around” getting used to the rifle after all.

    I’ll get in touch with the course instructor and find out a bit more info before I go but I’m sure he said he can do my course on a 1-1 midweek basis so the pressure of a queue behind me on the range may not be there. Maybe not!

    The Deerquest CD I have just now is a bit out of date but I have cross referenced every question with my BDS Stalkers 2010 manual to make sure I don’t make a boo boo with any change in regulation etc

    I will also practice the stances with the shotgun or old air rifle just to try and get a comfortable and relaxed position, good tip thanks.

    I'll let you know how I get on, good or bad ...!!



    Thanks again for your input

    Rb

  7. #7
    I didn't notice the other replies there gents, too busy doing big one fingered typing in reply to JC but thank you all above for the positive advice.

    I feel in a better position to go ahead and book the course for a few weeks after I get back home.

    I fully intend to enjoy the course and take as much from it as possible, but it's like any "test" I suppose, there's always a bit of apprehension (not always a bad thign I suppose)

    Once again, thanks for your input

    Rb

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by centralbeltstalker View Post
    once there, you will see the pros with all the (good kit), massive scopes bipods home loads etc etc balls it up anyway ha ha
    Bloody cheek - I resemble that remark!

  9. #9
    If you have not booked yet try Paul at Auchterarder. Small group course and he will give you range instruction before hand. When I sat mine I had not fired a rifle for 28 years. On the Saturday evening we went up to the range and shot (his rifle) a test round of the disciplines. On Sunday it was a breeze. He will take the time to instruct you prior to the test. Possibly he would take you out for just shooting a rifle if you asked him even if you did the L1 elsewhere. Please note I was a very experienced shot prior to the 28 year gap.
    Jim

  10. #10
    Confidence kills deer.

    By the sound of it the biggest hurdle you have is your own head, dont let it worry you, if you can shoot you will pass, in my opinion range time will be of little help.

    When I sat mine (along with 8 others) none of us stepped forward to be first, once the first candidate had been and done his bit it was a walk in the park.

    Very basic.
    There is a place on this planet for all of God's creatures, right next to my tatties and gravy!!!

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