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Thread: Injured deer - To shoot or not to shoot?

  1. #1

    Injured deer - To shoot or not to shoot?

    Throughout my recent daily visits to my "Deer Permission" (which I have to visit every day to check some Fenn Traps) I have noticed a roe doe (About 2 years old) which looks to have some relatively fresh injuries. There is a smallish wound (About 2 inches in diameter) on one of her front legs and another (About 4 or 5 inches in diameter) on the top of her back running along her spine. These wounds do not seem to be showing any signs of bleeding or infection and she appears to be moving without any real difficulties. It looks to me (And it is purely guess work) that she might have been either "clipped" by a car or "got at" by a dog (And in saying this I am not putting any blame on lurchers or long dogs, if it has been run by a dog it could have been any type of dog and possibly purely accidental).
    I had her in my crosshairs at about 150 yards a couple of days ago but for some reason I chose not to take the shot - I can't really explain why I didn't take the shot, it was quite windy but the shot would have been a fairly easy one to take, all I can say is that it just didn't seem right at the time and I always stand by my belief of "if there is ever any doubt don' release the safety catch".
    I saw her again yesterday and this time she looked to be was moving a little "stifly" - However this time she was over 200 yards away with a very strong side wind so I didn't even bring the rifle (My .270) up to my shoulder.
    In these circumstances I would like to ask the question to any of you with more experience than me - With a deer that looks like it has a couple of wounds from either an RTA or (possibly) a dog attack but the deer does not seem to be in any real "trouble" from it's injuries would you leave it and just "keep a close eye on it to make sure that it's condition does not deteriorate" or "take it out" at the first reasonable and safe opportunity you get? (Keeping in mind that this is a youngish doe that is not within any cull plan)



  2. #2
    If a deer looks injured then it is generally very injured as they carry pain much better than we ever could!
    I would always take an injured deer out as nature would also intend this with predation, and certainly before culling any healthy ones!
    Why would a young Roe Doe not fit into anyone's cull plan, especially one that is clearly injured?
    I'd go back and shoot it. You may well be quite surprised by the extent of its injuries up close.
    MS

  3. #3
    If I could I would have taken the shot, I shot a yearling buck about 3 weeks ago that had an injury to it's front leg, it was limping as it walked, on skinning it it had a broken leg.

  4. #4
    Injured deer go to the top of the cull list
    Ray

  5. #5
    I would be saying a bit of both. Deer do have a remarkable ability to recover. We had one buck that got caught up in a fence and its hind leg got pretty mangled. It got released the girls who keep horses on part of the ground. We kept an eye on him, and whilst for ever after he had a poor hind leg, he was perfectly and indeed became very tame. He was around for a few years but suspect he was then taken by poachers.

    If if a beast looks generally healthy, bright eyed glossy coat etc and she is feeding and not loosing condition then leave her. If you have a full plan and needing to reduce numbers heavily then I would take her.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Monkey Spanker View Post
    If a deer looks injured then it is generally very injured as they carry pain much better than we ever could!
    I would always take an injured deer out as nature would also intend this with predation, and certainly before culling any healthy ones!
    Why would a young Roe Doe not fit into anyone's cull plan, especially one that is clearly injured?
    I'd go back and shoot it. You may well be quite surprised by the extent of its injuries up close.
    MS
    +1 Animals should not be left to be in any pain, if it can be stopped. IMHO

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Ray7756 View Post
    Injured deer go to the top of the cull list
    Ray
    +1. Go back and shoot it

  8. #8
    I chose to take out a doe in buck season reason being after watching her for a while when she turned one of her front legs was completly gone healed up as if there had,nt been one there inside and out after gralloching,,,,but in my opinion i dont think she would have made it through any snow/ice cover at all,but you never know natures a funny thing but to stop any suffering at all its better to step in,,,,ps i later found out the lad next door had shot a doe and lost it,,,,so it might have been that one,,,atb doug,
    DONT START

  9. #9
    Aye ANNIE DO ROO..... that old chestnut eh??

  10. #10
    The welfare of the animal is paramount, shoot it at the next available opportunity!

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