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Thread: USA mpg... A true figure.

  1. #1

    USA mpg... A true figure.

    Hi guys, I have just been looking at the review of a 2016 model Volkswagen Tiguan on YouTube in the states. The first thing I noticed was the mpg figure on the window information sheet on the dealers forecourt. The car had the 200hp 2.0 litre turbo charged Diesel engine and so had plenty of performance. The sheet stated -

    City driving 21mpg
    Freeway driving 26mpg
    Average. 23mpg

    The sheet also went on to state how much extra money you could expect to spend on fuel over 5 years, compared to a car with average fuel consumption - $1750

    What a refreshingly honest statement of the true mpg figure you could expect to get, as compared to the hugely overinflated, fraudulent clap trap figures that we get in this country (along with the rest of Europe I assume)

    Presumably Volkswagen, along with the other car manufacturers in the states are forced to publish an accurate set of figures there, for fear of otherwise getting sued and massively fined.

    I pretty much guarantee that you won't see those figures published alongside the same model car for sale in the UK.
    Last edited by paultap; 04-02-2016 at 01:02.

  2. #2
    UK stats will probably say 40mpg or somesuch twaddle,and when you complain the old "under test conditions"excuse will be used .Test conditions meaning with no seats or doors and an empty body shell just an engine and steering wheel .
    she buys shoes i buy ,shooting,she stops buying shoes,il be amazed

  3. #3
    I think there is just as much "obfuscation" in the US.

    My wife's car is a hybrid sedan - with 42 mpg highway, 36 city. In real driving the car does indeed get great mileage, but we have never gotten the published rates. In Spring/Fall the car will do 39 on hwy. As soon as Summer comes, and the AC comes one, the number is 36. In the winter, with electric heat (because the hybrids have such small engines they don't create much waste heat) it drops to 32.

    Still a far sight better than my big old 'Merican 4WD Ford. However, with gas/petrol currently at $1.60 a gallon (roughly 60 pence a L) I could care less.

  4. #4
    The figures we get here are taken from tests that the manufacturers are allowed to perform on a rolling road ( not on actual roads ) and are legally open to a host of tricks which are used by the manufacturers to massively bump up the official figures, these figures have proved to be impossible to achieve under normal on road driving conditions.

    Some of the tricks used are -

    Tapeing up all door/ bonnet (hood) / boot (trunk) gaps around the car to improve aerodynamics
    Removing the passenger side wing mirror to improve aerodynamics
    Picking the lightest model car in the range and deleting any extras which would otherwise add weight.
    Using narrow tyres inflated to higher pressures to minimise wind and rolling resistance.
    using very low viscosity engine oil ( more like water) to reduce friction within the engine (only used for the test as it provides no long term engine protection)
    The alternators can be disconnected to produce less friction.
    They are also allowed a ridiculously long period of time to get up to speed and then to accelerate from one speed to another. Much slower than you would ever accelerate in the real world on the open road.


    Outrageously, all of the above is legally allowed to happen within the tests and the resultant figures produced are generally totally Unachievable in on road driving conditions.

    The tests are not carried out by independant bodies but by the manufactures themselves, with only some aspects of the tests being observed independently. Due to the importance of these figures, cars are designed to perform well aerodynamically in the straight ahead position as used in the test.

    There are no adverse weather conditions, wind, hills or traffic problems to contend with.

    As with the recent Volkswagen emissions scandal, complex electronics within the car can sense when the car is being tested and the engine performance/ fuelling is automatically adjusted to save fuel.

    The EU is currently looking at the inaccuracy of the figures produced from this sham of a test, but predictably is being lobbied by car manufacturers to be able to keep this form of test for as long as possible.

    The current test has been in operation in its current form since 1999 and a new test which provides far more accurate figures is long overdue. Opposition from manufactures includes the thinking that if the test was made more realistic and produced lower mpg figures, then the new cars would appear to have greater fuel consumption than the older models previously tested and that a fair comparison on fuel consumption could not therefore be made.......How very convenient for them!
    Last edited by paultap; 04-02-2016 at 13:53.

  5. #5
    USA mileage tests have traditionally been performed by private engineering firms, using off the show room cars on real roads or test tracks, but that may not be the case today, given the propensity of government agencies to feather their own nest.

    And the crash tests were performed by a forensics engineering firm, Sverdrup...probably still are.

  6. #6
    Here in NZ , when selling a car a has a star rating displayed , my vw says 7.00 ltrs/ 100km, surprisingly its averaging 7.1 ltr/100km air con on all the Time

  7. #7
    Remember that US gallons (3.785 litre) are different to UK gallons (4.546 litre). US mpg x 1.2 equals UK mpg.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Cootmeurer View Post
    Still a far sight better than my big old 'Merican 4WD Ford. However, with gas/petrol currently at $1.60 a gallon (roughly 60 pence a L) I could care less.
    $1.60 = ~1. 1 gallon = ~4l. Therefore, your $1.60/gallon is roughly 25p per litre. No wonder you're driving a big ol 'Merican Ford!

  9. #9
    For info my 2.0 DTI Zafira averages 10 miles/litre mostly sitting at 70 mph on the M5.

    D

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by paultap View Post
    The figures we get here are taken from tests that the manufacturers are allowed to perform on a rolling road.

    Some of the tricks used are -

    Tapeing up all door/ bonnet (hood) / boot (trunk) gaps around the car to improve aerodynamics
    Removing the passenger side wing mirror to improve aerodynamics
    Picking the lightest model car in the range and deleting any extras which would otherwise add weight.
    Using narrow tyres inflated to higher pressures to minimise wind and rolling resistance.
    using very low viscosity engine oil ( more like water) to reduce friction within the engine (only used for the test as it provides no long term engine protection)
    They are also allowed a ridiculously long period of time to get up to speed and then to accelerate from one speed to another. Much slower than you would ever accelerate in the real world on the open road.
    A mix of fact and fantasy here, most or even all of the tricks mentioned may be used at some point in a cars development, but not during MPG testing, think about it, why would they.

    1st. The MPG figures published are worked out from the vehicles emissions, not from fuel used.
    2nd. The test results are obtained on a rolling road, not a rolling road in a wind tunnel, so wind resistance is not a problem.

    Neil.

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