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Thread: Where do your MEPs stand on changes to the Firearms Directive?

  1. #1

    Where do your MEPs stand on changes to the Firearms Directive?

    use the link below to send an e-mail to your MEP's over 4200 people already have

    http://e-activist.com/ea-action/acti...paign.id=47315

  2. #2
    I did well before christmas and all my regional UKIP MEPs were strongly against the proposals the labour MEP was basically in favour and did not get a reply from the tory guy, my Westminster MP replied "Thankyou for voicing your concerns about the Refugee crisis" WTF!!! Just goes to show how well some MPs or their oppos actually read your personal emails.

    Ian.

  3. #3
    Good evening,
    Thank you for taking the time to contact me concerning the proposal to strengthen the current EU Firearms Directive. The proposal was launched on November 18 and is in line with the declaration by Home Affairs Ministers on 29 August 2015, repeating the call for the revision of the Firearms Directive and for a common approach on the deactivation of firearms.
    Labour MEPs have always supported tough firearms laws both at home and abroad and our support will continue as these proposals make their way through the legislative process which is hoped to be concluded swiftly.
    On the 7th December the proposal was brought to the Parliament's lead committee on single market issues, the Internal Market and Consumer Protection Committee (IMCO). The Parliament will now start to review and amend the proposal in January 2016, as soon as the MEP who will be responsible for the report from the Parliament's side, the Rapporteur, is announced.
    The key changes to the existing rules in order to improve and toughen the current EU firearms law cover eight keys areas: stricter rules on on-line sales; a ban on certain automatic weapons; the inclusion in the scope of the directive of blank firing weapons which have the potential to be transformed into a firearm; greater restrictions on the use and circulation of deactivated firearms; creation of national registers of deactivated firearms; collectors and brokers will now be brought into the scope of the directive; better traceability of firearms which means an improved marking system and an enhanced information exchange on firearms between Member States.
    Under the 2008 Firearms Directive firearms are not required to be on any register once deactivated. Evidence gathered by Commission studies showed this is a serious weakness in the EU legislation in terms of security. In fact, Slovakian media reported in February that the terrorists attacking Charlie Hebdo in January bought their Kalashnikovs legally in Slovakia, where they were sold as decommissioned weapons to be used as film props, but then found an expert in Belgium who was able to reactivate them.
    The new proposal will introduce stringent minimum common guidelines regarding the deactivation of firearms and will in turn render reactivation much more difficult. As a consequence, for the most dangerous firearms (category A) stricter rules have been introduced – even if they are deactivated. This now means that deactivated firearms from Category A (fully automatic weapons and military weapons) will not be allowed to be owned or traded by private persons (except for museums). A new provision establishes the requirement for record keeping of deactivated firearms in national registries and any transfer (ie change of owner) of deactivated firearms will now also be registered.
    For the sake of clarification, I would like to emphasise that hunters will not be affected by the proposed changes. It is true that collectors and brokers will now fall under the scope of the Directive. Collectors have been identified as a possible source of traffic of firearms by the evaluation carried out by the Commission. Therefore, in the new proposal the collectors will still have the possibility to acquire firearms but this will be subject to authorisation/declaration. Since brokers provide services similar to those of dealers, they will also be covered by this Directive.
    On all of these areas of improvement Labour MEPs support reform in order to tackle criminality and terrorism across the EU more effectively. I received several e-mails stating that in any case terrorists do not acquire firearms from legal sources and the new proposal is not the right solution. However, perhaps less striking to the public eye, but not less significant – not least in quantitative terms – are the numbers of people in Europe killed by firearms in the context of gun-related crime or in domestic shootings. It is estimated that between 2000 and 2010, over 10,000 victims of murder or manslaughter were killed by firearms in the 28 EU Member States. Every year, over 4000 suicides by firearm are registered in the EU.
    Terrorists aside these numbers are simply not acceptable and are a call for action, and we as Labour MEPs believe the Commission's proposal takes the right approach. The proposal only sets stringent minimum firearms laws for EU Member States and Member States may enforce stricter firearms laws in their home country should they choose to do so.
    Kind regards,
    Theresa

    [IMG]mailbox:///C:/Users/Steve%20Latham/AppData/Roaming/Thunderbird/Profiles/t24mmidh.default/Mail/pop3.talktalk.net/Inbox?number=11357165&part=1.2&filename=im age001.jpg[/IMG] Theresa Griffin
    MEP for the North West of England
    ASP 13 G 310
    European Parliament
    Rue Wiertz 60
    B-1047 Brussels

    Phone +32 228 45 271
    Fax +32 228 49 271
    LOW 7 T 67
    European Parliament
    1 av. du Président Robert Schuman
    F-67000 Strasbourg

    Phone +33 3881 75 271
    Fax +33 3881 79 271
    Email theresa.griffin@ep.europa.eu


    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by finnbear270 View Post
    Good evening,
    Thank you for taking the time to contact me concerning the proposal to strengthen the current EU Firearms Directive. The proposal was launched on November 18 and is in line with the declaration by Home Affairs Ministers on 29 August 2015, repeating the call for the revision of the Firearms Directive and for a common approach on the deactivation of firearms.
    Labour MEPs have always supported tough firearms laws both at home and abroad and our support will continue as these proposals make their way through the legislative process which is hoped to be concluded swiftly.
    On the 7th December the proposal was brought to the Parliament's lead committee on single market issues, the Internal Market and Consumer Protection Committee (IMCO). The Parliament will now start to review and amend the proposal in January 2016, as soon as the MEP who will be responsible for the report from the Parliament's side, the Rapporteur, is announced.
    The key changes to the existing rules in order to improve and toughen the current EU firearms law cover eight keys areas: stricter rules on on-line sales; a ban on certain automatic weapons; the inclusion in the scope of the directive of blank firing weapons which have the potential to be transformed into a firearm; greater restrictions on the use and circulation of deactivated firearms; creation of national registers of deactivated firearms; collectors and brokers will now be brought into the scope of the directive; better traceability of firearms which means an improved marking system and an enhanced information exchange on firearms between Member States.
    Under the 2008 Firearms Directive firearms are not required to be on any register once deactivated. Evidence gathered by Commission studies showed this is a serious weakness in the EU legislation in terms of security. In fact, Slovakian media reported in February that the terrorists attacking Charlie Hebdo in January bought their Kalashnikovs legally in Slovakia, where they were sold as decommissioned weapons to be used as film props, but then found an expert in Belgium who was able to reactivate them.
    The new proposal will introduce stringent minimum common guidelines regarding the deactivation of firearms and will in turn render reactivation much more difficult. As a consequence, for the most dangerous firearms (category A) stricter rules have been introduced – even if they are deactivated. This now means that deactivated firearms from Category A (fully automatic weapons and military weapons) will not be allowed to be owned or traded by private persons (except for museums). A new provision establishes the requirement for record keeping of deactivated firearms in national registries and any transfer (ie change of owner) of deactivated firearms will now also be registered.
    For the sake of clarification, I would like to emphasise that hunters will not be affected by the proposed changes. It is true that collectors and brokers will now fall under the scope of the Directive. Collectors have been identified as a possible source of traffic of firearms by the evaluation carried out by the Commission. Therefore, in the new proposal the collectors will still have the possibility to acquire firearms but this will be subject to authorisation/declaration. Since brokers provide services similar to those of dealers, they will also be covered by this Directive.
    On all of these areas of improvement Labour MEPs support reform in order to tackle criminality and terrorism across the EU more effectively. I received several e-mails stating that in any case terrorists do not acquire firearms from legal sources and the new proposal is not the right solution. However, perhaps less striking to the public eye, but not less significant – not least in quantitative terms – are the numbers of people in Europe killed by firearms in the context of gun-related crime or in domestic shootings. It is estimated that between 2000 and 2010, over 10,000 victims of murder or manslaughter were killed by firearms in the 28 EU Member States. Every year, over 4000 suicides by firearm are registered in the EU.
    Terrorists aside these numbers are simply not acceptable and are a call for action, and we as Labour MEPs believe the Commission's proposal takes the right approach. The proposal only sets stringent minimum firearms laws for EU Member States and Member States may enforce stricter firearms laws in their home country should they choose to do so.
    Kind regards,
    Theresa

    [IMG]mailbox:///C:/Users/Steve%20Latham/AppData/Roaming/Thunderbird/Profiles/t24mmidh.default/Mail/pop3.talktalk.net/Inbox?number=11357165&part=1.2&filename=im age001.jpg[/IMG] Theresa Griffin
    MEP for the North West of England
    ASP 13 G 310
    European Parliament
    Rue Wiertz 60
    B-1047 Brussels

    Phone +32 228 45 271
    Fax +32 228 49 271
    LOW 7 T 67
    European Parliament
    1 av. du Président Robert Schuman
    F-67000 Strasbourg

    Phone +33 3881 75 271
    Fax +33 3881 79 271
    Email theresa.griffin@ep.europa.eu


    So that equates (on average) to 50 deaths per year per country. If you compare that to knife related homicides in the UK, which hovers around the 200 per year ("In 2011/12 there were 200 homicides using a sharp instrument including knives and broken bottles the lowest number since 1996, accounting for 39% of all homicides." from House of Common's stats) , you have to wonder their reasoning......

  5. #5
    Reasoning?
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  6. #6
    Only one of our MP's replied ....here it is

    Dear Constituent,

    Thank you for getting in touch with me about your concerns over the European Commission's strengthening of firearms control across the EU.

    I understand your concern as terrorist attacks have, in the past, been used as an excuse to pass through hasty, ill-advised, authoritarian legislation such as the 2011 Patriot Act only one month after 9/11. However, this is not one of these occasions.

    The plans presented were first proposed in the European Security Agenda, adopted in 2015. The Commission itself accepts that, in light of the recent horrific attacks on Paris, the implementation of the plan has been significantly accelerated. This is not to say that the attacks are the reason for the measures.

    One of the new provisions proposed by the Commission is to modify the classification regarding a specific category of semi-automatic firearms. These specific weapons ("semi-automatic firearms which resemble weapons with automatic mechanisms"), classified under the existing Directive in category B7 as legal weapons subject to an authorisation, would be classified as prohibited weapons. My group is going to assess very carefully all the possible implications of this proposed change. We generally share the Commission's view that at least some semi-automatic firearms pose a threat to security because they can easily be converted to automatic firearms or have the capacity to cause considerable damage due to the high number of rounds. We believe, in any case, that there is a need to clarify and harmonise at EU level the rules defining which weapons are particularly dangerous and should therefore be banned for civil use.

    I understand the concerns expressed by many hunters and sport shooters who feel the risk of an amalgam between their activities and terrorism, or fear the addition of useless restrictions to the legal exercise of their activities. This was not the purpose of the 2008 Directive and it should not become an effect of the upcoming revision.

    I am convinced that the European Parliament and the Member States in the Council (as co-legislators) will find suitable solutions during the legislative process which will allow for the combination of the peaceful pursuit of activities of hunters and sport shooters and the measures needed to reinforce the security of all citizens.

    My group in Parliament is determined to support or propose measures which bring real and concrete improvements to the security of citizens, rather than provisions which would merely serve a purpose of window dressing.

    In addition to this issue of semi-automatic firearms, there are many other measures proposed by the Commission and/or proposals that my group wants to put forward in the framework of this revision. The existing legislation contains a series of loopholes, for instance in terms of deactivation, registration and marking of firearms, their parts, components and ammunition, of online acquisition of such products, as well as in terms of information exchange between authorities in charge of controls. We will be attentive to propose the most appropriate measures in order to efficiently protect the security of all citizens.

    Given your interest in the work of the office, I will, if I may, add you to our email list. Your email is of course kept strictly confidential, we are registered under the Data Protection Act and you can unsubscribe at any time.

    Yours aye,

    Alyn

  7. #7
    Our Conservative MEP ( Moray ) gave a frankly ' Yes Minister' reply; trotting gl;ib lines and failing to acknowledge any of the points raised ( Its Andy - so from my past posts you can imagine the points I put! ). I responded politely and took him comstructively to task on specifics such as they were in his reply. He kindly took time to repond further, referring to the stance of he and his colleagues - but frankly fudging.

    So I politely replied, drawing his attention to the variance between his reply and that given to BASC by one of his said colleagues.

    No response....

    So when a week or so later I received a mailshot from the same guy - effectively enquiring how I proposed to vote in any Euro referendum I simply attached my correspondence to the left blank form and posted it back at their expense.

    Its when you encounter something on which you know a bit about that it hits home just how feeble so many of our 'elected leaders' actually are and causes serious pause to the quite probable rank injustice, ignorance and gravy train mentality which is brought to bear on a whole range of matters. Frightening.
    Stalking, Courses, Gear - Moray Outfiiting Website here - Welcome
    BASC Approved Trainer & Assessor. Cairngorm National Park Authority Approved Supplier. Supported by Sauer Arms
    See you at the Stalking Fair, Scone & Moy 2017




  8. #8
    UKIP MEP's - Against
    Labour MEP's - For, as they want to prevent any further deaths, I asked how many drink related deaths there were in Europe and how they intended to address that problem and got no reply.
    MP - No reply

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by finnbear270 View Post
    Reasoning?
    As in the reason for bringing in the legislation when there are far more deaths caused by other means that are easier to combat, like knife crime or car accidents as Akeld says below.

  10. #10
    I've written to all 4 of my MEPs, only labour responded so far. You may get s sense of deja-vu if you have read the the rest of this thread. It's a stock response:

    Thank you for taking the time to contact me concerning the proposal to strengthen the current EU Firearms Directive. Labour MEPs have always supported firm but fair firearms laws both at home and abroad and our support will continue as these proposals make their way through the legislative process which is hoped to be concluded swiftly. I am firmly in favour of these directives, and would like to take a moment to outline why.

    The key changes to the existing rules in order to improve and toughen the current EU firearms law cover eight keys areas: stricter rules on on-line sales; a ban on certain automatic weapons; the inclusion in the scope of the directive of blank firing weapons which have the potential to be transformed into a firearm; greater restrictions on the use and circulation of deactivated firearms; creation of national registers of deactivated firearms; collectors and brokers will now be brought into the scope of the directive; better traceability of firearms which means an improved marking system and an enhanced information exchange on firearms between Member States.

    Under the 2008 Firearms Directive firearms are not required to be on any register once deactivated. Evidence gathered by Commission studies showed this is a serious weakness in the EU legislation in terms of security. In fact, Slovakian media reported in February that the terrorists attacking Charlie Hebdo in January bought their Kalashnikovs legally in Slovakia, where they were sold as decommissioned weapons to be used as film props, but then found an expert in Belgium who was able to reactivate them.

    The new proposal will introduce stringent minimum common guidelines regarding the deactivation of firearms and will in turn render reactivation much more difficult. As a consequence, for the most dangerous firearms (category A) stricter rules have been introduced - even if they are deactivated. This now means that deactivated firearms from Category A (fully automatic weapons and military weapons) will not be allowed to be owned or traded by private persons (except for museums). A new provision establishes the requirement for record keeping of deactivated firearms in national registries and any transfer (i.e. change of owner) of deactivated firearms will now also be registered.

    For the sake of clarification, I would like to emphasise that hunters will not be affected by the proposed changes. It is true that collectors and brokers will now fall under the scope of the Directive. Collectors have been identified as a possible source of traffic of firearms by the evaluation carried out by the Commission. Therefore, in the new proposal the collectors will still have the possibility to acquire firearms but this will be subject to authorisation/declaration. Since brokers provide services similar to those of dealers, they will also be covered by this Directive.

    On all of these areas of improvement Labour MEPs support reform in order to tackle criminality and terrorism across the EU more effectively. However, these proposals also strike at a problem less striking to the public eye, but not less significant - not least in quantitative terms - the numbers of people in Europe killed by firearms in the context of gun-related crime or in domestic shootings. It is estimated that between 2000 and 2010, over 10,000 victims of murder or manslaughter were killed by firearms in the 28 EU Member States. Every year, over 4000 suicides by firearm are registered in the EU.

    Terrorists aside these numbers are simply not acceptable and are a call for action, and we as Labour MEPs believe the Commission's proposal takes the right approach.

    Kind regards,
    Derek Vaughan MEP

    4th Floor, Transport House
    1 Cathedral Road
    Cardiff
    CF11 9SD
    Tel: 02920 227660
    Email: contact@derekvaughanmep.org.uk

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