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Thread: Tackling deer - legalities?

  1. #1

    Tackling deer - legalities?

    Afternoon

    The other posts has got me wondering - if you use a tracking dog and then unleash the dog to pull the deer down does this contravene the Hunting Act here in England?

  2. #2
    I would hazard the guess that "to bring down " a deer would be at the very least emotive, never mind illegal. I am not qualified to make any further comment on the real legal status, but would err on the side of caution & use a scenting / trailing dog to do just that.
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  3. #3
    Use a rifle, it is more humane and quicker than a dog !

    Brianm

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by BenB View Post
    Afternoon

    The other posts has got me wondering - if you use a tracking dog and then unleash the dog to pull the deer down does this contravene the Hunting Act here in England?
    I think you need 2 or more dogs for that act?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by BenB View Post
    Afternoon

    The other posts has got me wondering - if you use a tracking dog and then unleash the dog to pull the deer down does this contravene the Hunting Act here in England?
    Yes.

    As far as Im aware hunting a wild mammal with a dog is illegal (there are some exceptions) including foxes, hares, deer ect but you are allowed to flush them from cover, how you define the difference between the two is anybody's guess.

    Hunting Act 2004...

    http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2004..._20040037_en_1
    Last edited by Dan Gliballs; 22-05-2010 at 15:25.
    There is a place on this planet for all of God's creatures, right next to my tatties and gravy!!!

  6. #6
    I wouldn't bet the house on this as there are no test cases I know of, but......

    I believe its legal prior to shooting a deer but I presume you mean once it is shot, you have wounded the deer and it needs following up. Yes it is legal under the hunting act. If your stalking for.....

    preventing or reducing serious damage which the wild mammal would otherwise cause—
    to livestock,
    to game birds or wild birds (within the meaning of section 27 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (c. 69)),
    to food for livestock,
    to crops (including vegetables and fruit),
    to growing timber,
    to fisheries,
    to other property, or
    to the biological diversity of an area (within the meaning of the United Nations Environmental Programme Convention on Biological Diversity of 1992),
    obtaining meat to be used for human or animal consumption, or
    participation in a field trial.

    You must use only 1 or 2 dogs and be on the land legally. There are other conditions, but thats the jist of it

    However if you have a wounded deer and it needs dispatching, say the the road side after an RTA or other justified reason. If using a .22lr or a knife is the best way, your justified under various laws/act etc that also applies to using a dog, if you think its the best way, even if you have just shot it.

  7. #7
    I think the definitive phrase was to "Pull down"........................................... nuff said!
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  8. #8
    I seam to remember when the law came out that once an animal was wounded you could use any number of dogs to bring it to book. so yes you can use a dog to bring down a wounded animal shooting is the better option but not always going to be possible or preacticable.

    Dave

  9. #9
    Of course if you track a wounded dear with a dog on a long lead, often you can finish the deer with a shot. But if the deer has a jaw or leg wound they may be off before you can shoot, thats when you want a dog that will pull down or bay the animal.
    Only wounded roe or small fallow should have a loosed dog on them.



    www.prokennel.se

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Brianm View Post
    Use a rifle, it is more humane and quicker than a dog !

    Brianm
    While shooting the animal again is always the best option, the trouble is a wounded deer’s natural instinct is to head for cover, the thicker the better, or make down hill to water, but don’t bet on this as the buck I tracked last weekend went up hill away from water, but into thick cover.

    It is quite impractical to try and shoot a animal again while you are crawling on your knees though thicket stage plantation, you will never no matter how quick a runner you are kept up with a deer on 3 legs or jaw shot one so forget about keeping your dog on a line, if you want to put the deer out of its misery.

    An experienced medium dog sized dog will dispatch a roe very quickly, the reality is that once your dog catches up with the deer you will be out of the equation, it will tackle the deer its self, or bay the deer and wait for the rest of the pack, “you” to get there and assist. You will not have much input on the situation.

    In Scotland do want ever is necessary to stop the deer’s suffering, you are covered under section 25 of deer act of Scotland.



    ATB

    Tahr

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