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Thread: How long to age wild boar in chiller and what cuts etc do you recommend.

  1. #1

    How long to age wild boar in chiller and what cuts etc do you recommend.

    Sorry to be asking so many questions. I am getting this boar butchered by a local chap who did a sterling job last time on a a younger animal last year. We hung that one for a week. He suggests hanging it for 2 weeks this time as the last one was a tad tough .. Is this OK seems a bit long for pig? How long do you guys reccomend. He has no particular experience with wild boar but recons the meat will be more tender.
    I think this one is 3+ year old male 85kg (though I haven't had the chance to check the teeth). What cuts do you recommend I ask for, he made great bacon last time so plenty of that including back bacon, as it is an older animal shall I just get the rest sausageified or is it worth doing something with the haunches? He is offering gammon steaks.

    Cheers George

  2. #2
    Meat toughness and quality is a function of:

    1) Age of the animal, what it has fed on, where it has lived and general condition at time of slaughter. A young animal that's had an easy life and lots of food will be tender, an old animal that has run up and down a mountain all day and every day will tough.

    2) Slaughter stress, in particular adrenalin. Adrenalin in pigs at time of slaughter does bad things and causes "watery pork". The less stress the better. An undisturbed animal at time of shot will be very good eating. The same animal shot whilst it is running hard trying to escape will be tough - probably why driven pheasants often have the consistency of old shoe leather!

    3) Post slaughter handling - in particular getting the meat down to 4 degrees.

    4) Hanging in a chiller and humidity of the chiller

    5) Cooking.

    Can't comment on wild boar specifically. Hugh Fearnley Whitting whatever has a very good book on Meat with good chapters on rearing, slaughter, butchery which includes sections on pigs as well as game. Get hold of a copy if I were you.

  3. #3
    another point on boar is whether it was running around with sows on heat at the time... this might cause higher levels of certain hormones/pheromones that cause what is known as boar taint. These first appear when the (male) boar reaches sexual maturity and are stored in the animals fat reserves.
    Some people are not affected by this while other people are. Those that are will not eat it as it causes an intense pungent 'smell' sensation when you are eating it. Its a genetic thing.

    Personally I dont know if chilling for long periods will influence this in any positive way. I know some people used chilled ice water to help remove it. so maybe.
    What I do know is that if aged/cured/smoked as either prosciutto or salami, the 'taint' goes away.

    as for my favourite cuts- all of it? I enjoy barbequed rack/ribs/belly over hot coals with just a pinch of salt. Loins i use like with normal pork. All the rest I cook up as stew. If its young enough then slow roasted over a pit, whole.
    Last edited by ileso; 18-02-2016 at 17:44.

  4. #4
    Meat will age after it comes out of the freezer just like it does before it in frozen. If it's tough, take the next joint out and keep it in the fridge for a week before you cook it.

  5. #5
    Clemson University and Penn State University have schools of food science which do a lot of research on the processing and cooking of wild game, not just farm and ranch raised livestock. And because of their rural locations, they include a lot on deer and wild boar. Here is one article put out by the Extension Service, which is a service to farmers and rural dwellers in every possible subject.

    Safe Handling of Wild Game Meats
    http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgi.../hgic3516.html

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Heym SR20 View Post
    Meat toughness and quality is a function of:

    1) Age of the animal, what it has fed on, where it has lived and general condition at time of slaughter. A young animal that's had an easy life and lots of food will be tender, an old animal that has run up and down a mountain all day and every day will tough.

    2) Slaughter stress, in particular adrenalin. Adrenalin in pigs at time of slaughter does bad things and causes "watery pork". The less stress the better. An undisturbed animal at time of shot will be very good eating. The same animal shot whilst it is running hard trying to escape will be tough - probably why driven pheasants often have the consistency of old shoe leather!

    3) Post slaughter handling - in particular getting the meat down to 4 degrees.

    4) Hanging in a chiller and humidity of the chiller

    5) Cooking.

    Can't comment on wild boar specifically. Hugh Fearnley Whitting whatever has a very good book on Meat with good chapters on rearing, slaughter, butchery which includes sections on pigs as well as game. Get hold of a copy if I were you.
    I wasn't aware that watery pork can be found in wild boar, back in the 1980's when I kept pigs the PSE gene was closely associated to well muscled Belgian breeds and related cross breeds. The Tamworths that I had did not suffer from that problem

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by liongeorge View Post
    Sorry to be asking so many questions. I am getting this boar butchered by a local chap who did a sterling job last time on a a younger animal last year. We hung that one for a week. He suggests hanging it for 2 weeks this time as the last one was a tad tough .. Is this OK seems a bit long for pig? How long do you guys reccomend. He has no particular experience with wild boar but recons the meat will be more tender.
    I think this one is 3+ year old male 85kg (though I haven't had the chance to check the teeth). What cuts do you recommend I ask for, he made great bacon last time so plenty of that including back bacon, as it is an older animal shall I just get the rest sausageified or is it worth doing something with the haunches? He is offering gammon steaks.

    Cheers George
    The boar would have dried out. The maximum a butcher hangs pork is a week. There probably won't be a lot of fat on it and it being old the muscles would be starting to go backwards. .

    If you need any more advice feel free to pm me

    Atb......scott

  8. #8
    Very good article. Southern boys can cook game and fine job at that. I used to live in Spartanburg, SC.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by shark1 View Post
    Very good article. Southern boys can cook game and fine job at that. I used to live in Spartanburg, SC.
    Spartanburg! You could just go to The Beacon for your barbeque. And fried onion rings. Ymmm.

  10. #10
    Thanks guys , the pig is now skinned and at the butchers as we had to move it from mates chiller as an inspector came and had a hissy fit on numerous points none of them valid. The long and short being I don't think he'd seen one before this being Hampshire and didn't have a clue and that if it were to stay it would need full inspection costing 80. As my mate has no experience with them he allowed himself to be bamboozled. The idiot said he would have to drive as sample 80 miles to get it tested etc. I imagine he was talking about the trichinela test which I had popped in the post first thing Monday morning and had an email back by Tuesday afternoon all for free.
    God I hate some of the red tape and beurocrats in this country, I am sure there would no problem if I lived in Portugal or Greece.

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