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Thread: Annealing, do you do it?

  1. #1

    Annealing, do you do it?

    Toying with buying or building an annealer. Anyone here anneal their brass or just buy new after a few reloads?

    Trying to gain some opinions as to the benefits of annealing as I only reload .223 brass at the moment.

  2. #2
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    I built my own machine and it was ok but I use case prep n here and he does a,cracking job,

    i would love to have the funds to do it at home but I don't have the time or the money,

    very happy with with the service from case prep.

    bob.
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Caesium View Post
    Toying with buying or building an annealer. Anyone here anneal their brass or just buy new after a few reloads?

    Trying to gain some opinions as to the benefits of annealing as I only reload .223 brass at the moment.
    Currently thinking about it. I load 308 Win and 20 Tactical. For the 308 I can reload and shoot a case 3 or 4 times and then toss it, I'm happy with this. Brass for the 20 Tac is more difficult to source. From what I've seen so far there are big, semi-commercial machines for annealing cartridge cases which are several hundred pounds; not keen on the idea. Alternatively, the Shooting Shed can supply an annealing cup which I'm guessing holds the case and acts like a heat sink that fits into the chuck of a cordless drill of screwdriver so you can rotate the case and heat the neck evenly with a blowtorch. They're £15 each. I might give it a go.
    CH

  4. #4
    Yup, I anneal my cases every 3-4 firings. Helps them last a much longer time. I don't shoot too many rounds. so just either hold the case in my fingers while heating the necks, when they're hot enough place on a damp cloth. Larger cases don't really need to be quenched, that's usually done to stop the heat transferring down the case body.
    It's an easy peasy process if you don't have to do too many at a time.
    I do 20 at a go.
    If you want. you can use a lazy susan to rotate cases that stand in a dish of water. Not expensive and you just knock them over when the neck is at the right temp. Doddle & cheap as chips!
    Blaser K95 Luxus Kipplaufbüchse .25-06Rem. Zeiss 8x56, 110gn Nosler Accubond = Game Over!

  5. #5
    Lapua brass for .30-06 is not cheap so it pays to anneal the cases after 4 firings. A blow torch and some water to dip the cases in and you are ready to go.

  6. #6
    The benefits of annealing case necks & shoulders are - extended case life ( & save money) & to get more predictable neck tension.
    I anneal all my brass after 3 firings maximum.
    There is no need to quench cases in water after annealing. It does nothing to the metal except cool the cases & make them wet. The annealing is done by heating the metal to the correct temperature & holding it there for a controlled period of time. (Too high temperature and / or too long time at heat can over anneal the brass) -- Not by quenching.
    Case manufacturers don't quench cases.
    I run the cases through the annealer I've made & catch them on a metal baking tray. I don't let them drop far to avoid dinging the mouth area. I do cool the cases by setting a fan over them just to speed up the process when I have a few hundred cases to do. Just to have them ready to put into the boxes sooner & stop me from burning my impatient fingers.

    Ian

  7. #7
    Do you chaps use Tempilaq to figure out how long they need to be heated for? If so, what temperature Tempilaq do you chaps use and which method do you find best? Tempilaq down the length of the case and wait for colour change, or a little on the inside of the neck and wait for it to melt?

    I've always found the Shooting Shed products to be excellent, I might give their annealing cups a try. I like the idea of the added heat sink protection.

  8. #8
    Yes, I anneal after four cycles - Here's my machine in action:


  9. #9
    I use Tempilaq 750 degree F (399 C) to indicate temperature. I paint it on the inside of the case neck of the setup case as the gas flame affects the Tempilaq before it heats the brass if on the case outside.
    You can put the Tempilaq down the outside of the case wall to proove that you aren't heating the head end of the case too much.

    My annealer is very much like the Mk1 version one shown above by 1066 in his video. Works a treat!

    Ian

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by 1066 View Post
    Yes, I anneal after four cycles - Here's my machine in action:
    Do you sell these 1066?

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