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Thread: 7x57 / .275 rigby thoughts and experiences.

  1. #1

    7x57 / .275 rigby thoughts and experiences.

    Hi all, I've just picked up a my latest purchase. A 1915 Alex Henry .275 rigby built on an oberndorf built Mauser 98 action. If I'm honest I only bought it as I love the gun and wanted that action in my collection. First impressions are its a lovely round to shoot. I can't wait to get it out hunting this season. After reading up on karamojo bell and Jim Corbett I'm quite taken by this little round.
    Mid also like suggestions on which little scope to fit eventually.
    Tha js guys!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails image.jpg  

  2. #2
    That's really sweet. Hornady do a 275 Rigby load with brass marked 275 Rigby. William Evans stock them.

    in terms of a scope, a 6x42 s&b, Swarovski or zeiss but of an older generation, not the latest crinkle finish. As to mounts either a traditional side mount - recknagel do make them, or adding bases onto the top of the action. Big question is whether it is drilled and tapped for mounts and whether you want to drill the action.

    If if its not drilled I would seriously consider using it with open sights. Nowt wrong with them!

  3. #3
    Shame they drilled and tapped the action but it is done now! Those are bases that I can see on the top of the action are they not?

    Now if it were mine I would be fitting a sleek 4x or possibly a 6x scope. Am thinking that a Pecar Champion as they have the centered crosshairs. Try looking at this site: ..

    http://www.emmacustomrifles.co.uk/opticsused.htm

    I am not suggesting that the prices are good but there is a nice selection of the type of slim scope that would look good and perform well on your classic rifle.

    Of course Zeiss, Khales, Swaroski, Karl Kaps and Meopta probably all made suitable scopes then there are the American scopes that would suit from Redfield, Weaver and of course Lyman though they will have finer crosshairs than the European offerings. There were also some good Japanese scopes from the 1960's and 70's that would also suit. Kassnar, Nikko Stirling and Hakko come to mind. No doubt others will be able to offer more suggestions.

  4. #4
    Thanks guys, I've had a play with it on targets with iron sights, bloody good fun but and just able to shoot out to 100 yards at a 8 inch target. But for hunting with modern ammo it needs a scope I think. It's a shame that I can't seem to find out what the old express sights are regulated with, then I could have loaded up a similar round and she could stay naked and lovely��

  5. #5
    I have one which is on loan to a mate. 6x42 scope, conetrol mounts and aftermarket safety which means the scope cane be mounted a lot lower. Ballistic studies throw up some interesting data about loads.

  6. #6
    The 275 Rigby used a semi spitzer bullet of 173 grains and chances are that is what you rifle is regulated for. Have been digging on the web to see if i could find the information about as to why Rigby adopted this but have failed so far.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Conure View Post
    The 275 Rigby used a semi spitzer bullet of 173 grains and chances are that is what you rifle is regulated for. Have been digging on the web to see if i could find the information about as to why Rigby adopted this but have failed so far.
    The original 7x57 Mauser was chambered in an 1892 Mauser, then saw extensive service in the 1893 and 1894 Mausers, firing a 173-gr bullet at 2,200 fps.

    When the 1896 Mauser was developed, powders had improved, so the 7x57 / 173-gr load could now move at 2,290 FPS with the same peak chamber pressures as before.

    In 1907, John Rigby started building sporting rifles on the very strong 1898 Mauser action, and around a 140-gr bullet at 2,800 FPS. The sights on most British rifles will be set up for that. This was stunning departure from the slow big bore rifles of the 19th century. The 173-gr load in the 98 Mauser now was 2,540 FPS.

    Karamojo Bell's 7x57 gets used again on big game
    American Rifleman | s .275 Rigby
    Click image for larger version. 

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  8. #8
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    Hello Southern, I think that this is always the dilemna with "vintage" or "classic" rifles that have not got as from original a 'scope or mounts.

    The finding of a contemporary 'scope, per se, isn't a problem. It's always....with British rifles...the mounts.

    All I can suggest is look through old Gavin Gardiner and Holt's archives and see the few such rifles that were 'scoped from new and have something made up.

    Certainly that's what I'd do. With continental rifles the process is easier as the "answer" is usually some sort of Suhler mount!

    Last, as you know, the rifle will be British Proved with the service load so, it should, say 140 grns or 173 grns for the bullet weight.

    Bell used 173 grns I think? Rigby's "A" or "No 1" was it? The 140 grn being "B" or "No2"? Or some such?

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Conure View Post
    The 275 Rigby used a semi spitzer bullet of 173 grains and chances are that is what you rifle is regulated for. Have been digging on the web to see if i could find the information about as to why Rigby adopted this but have failed so far.
    Correct. I had an old WR .275 for a few years, it was great fun but quite difficult to load for and factory ammo was very hard to find. I shot it with the iron sights and an old Pecar 6x scope. Biggest problem was cases, huge variation in dimensions.

  10. #10
    I working up loads to match the regulation of my 7x57R to the 173-gr bullet at 2,340 FPS, I have worked up a 140-gr load at 2,650 which shoots to the same sights, out to 100 yards.

    Also, many of these old rifles have two leaves, one for 100 yards and the second for a lighter and higher velocity bullet set for 300 yards.

    I would not fret about scoping it. I have vintage Mausers in 6.5x55, 8x57, 8x60S and .270 which all can shoot the bright center out of a clay pigeon at 200 yards, from a rest. Even if they were only 1.5 MOA rifles, I would not scope them and mess up the balance.

    I recommend buying some mild loads from the USA, like Federal 140-gr, shoot those, then just neck size the brass, and reload to the same velocity. I bet the groups shrink.
    Last edited by Southern; 26-03-2016 at 15:20.

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