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Thread: Should I shoot vixens at this time of year?

  1. #1

    Should I shoot vixens at this time of year?

    Hi there,

    I'm not much of a foxer, but I do shoot the odd one to keep the numbers down on my main permission. Normally when I'm out for deer and I see one I'll shoot it, if I feel like it.

    I shot a vixen this evening at last light and am wondering whether I should actually not be shooting vixen at this time of year in case they have cubs below ground that are dependant? I do find it hard to tell a dog from a vixen through a high mag scope in poor light. What is the state of fox young at this time of year and what is your policy on vixens? In this particular case she was fairly small and didn't appear to be breast feeding.

    Thanks, any information appreciated.

  2. #2
    YES.... and if the cubs are there ....them too. No ifs buts etc...... SHOOT THEM.

    David.

  3. #3
    Its really what your land owner wants if he's not bothered by foxes then why risk cubs starving if he wants them dead then you stuck. I don't really agree with the shoot on site theory they have as much right to respect as a deer and most people wouldn't shoot a doe and ignore the followers. I don't see how you could be sure what sex a fox is under a lamp or poor light

  4. #4
    If you want foxes to continue hoovering up lapwing chicks and any other ground nesting bird they can get hold of, then leave them alone. If, however, you realise that they are vermin, then shoot the damned things.

  5. #5
    Foxes can have cubs at any time between Xmas and July, so if you don't shoot when there might be young about, you're going to miss six months of the year. Also, most fox groups consist of a dominant male and female as well as two or three 'helper' vixens which are usually the sisters or daughters of the alpha female - on top of this, few mother vixens will leave their cubs until after they've been weaned. In other words, if you do shoot a milky vixen - I shot one tonight, then there's every chance the cubs will still be fed by the other adults - unless you've shot them too. Right now, I'm run off my feet by farmers who want me to try and stop the foxes from killing their lambs; if I didn't do it, you can be damn sure they'd get someone else in to do the job.

  6. #6
    As Paddy said............... "Right now, I'm run off my feet by farmers who want me to try and stop the foxes from killing their lambs; if I didn't do it, you can be damn sure they'd get someone else in to do the job" If you have a conscience about doing it, leave it to someone else who will .

    David

  7. #7
    I understand that point of view. It really does vary on the permission. Eg I have about 400 acres of arable farm land I shoot where the farmer doesn't want the foxes shot because they cause him no harm. It's interesting that there are actually low rabbit numbers and loads of foxes about which I leave alone of course. My main permission that I talked about has sheep and lambs but they've never had problem with foxes attacking lambs. They occasionally have chickens killed by foxes but acknowledge that their fences are crap so haven't got any particular desire to see the fox population wiped out. Hence I can do what I want really. Sure if they came to me and said we want the foxes wiping out I'd do it bit I don't see the need to be honest.

  8. #8
    Hi, if you are rearing lambs, piglets or game birds you simply can't afford to leave foxes alone,they are opportunist and will cause untold mayhem if left alone.They need to be controlled all year around.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by swifturn View Post
    Hi, if you are rearing lambs, piglets or game birds you simply can't afford to leave foxes alone,they are opportunist and will cause untold mayhem if left alone.They need to be controlled all year around.
    Yup. We don't seem to have much of a problem round here with foxes and lambs ... until this spring. Maybe it's because of the horrible wet winter, but they've been a major issue.
    As such, currently, if a fox is sighted, then it dies. If we find earths with cubs then they die.

  10. #10
    the way ive found it over the years j111 is that you are actually hard pushed to orphan cubs, as already said in this thread vixens will stay bellow ground for the main part until her cubs have been weaned off milk and are on to solids and she will be feed by the dog fox and any "helpers", so basicaly you will have to shot the dog and the other "helpers" before she needs to come above ground and hunt for herslef and this is where it gets even trickyier for yourself, as ive always noticed that vixens will change there behaviour when they have cubs about, they will be much more twitchy and more switched on and will take no chances making them a lot harder to shot so unless your putting some serious time into fox shooting or your sat on the earths your really going to find it hard to take all the adult foxes away from a litter of cubs before they get big enough to fend for themselves

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