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Thread: Terminology... Sub Maxillary VS. Sub Mandibular

  1. #1

    Terminology... Sub Maxillary VS. Sub Mandibular

    Having a discussion with a vet the other day and they pulled me up when discussing the Sub Maxillaries.. They asked me if i meant the Retropharyngeal.. I said no, we discussed their locations and then i was told that the Sub Maxillary (as we know them) are actually Sub Mandibular when referring to deer/bovine/equine type animals?


    Any takers?

  2. #2
    Submandibular is the correct term. I have pointed this out to people including AWs for years. A well known person in the stalking field refers to the clavicle when sticking a knife in between the first ribs towards the heart to facilitate bleeding and actually teaches this on his DVD.Only primates have clavicles and cats have a rudimentary remnant one as vet students find to their cost when looking at X-rays under exam conditions.

  3. #3
    I'd say they are both right, they both mean jawbone and sub meaning below (as in submarine) - one is probably derived from the Latin (max) and the Mandible (google says) late middle English. I seem to remember in my studies (over 25 years ago) both were used in the text books.

    For positioning (Retropharyngeal) I felt it helps to remember Retro means behind (as in 'Retro' flared trousers) and thus behind the pharanx.

    I didn't get beyond A-Level Biology mind so a vet might put me right on here!

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by morena View Post
    Submandibular is the correct term. I have pointed this out to people including AWs for years. A well known person in the stalking field refers to the clavicle when sticking a knife in between the first ribs towards the heart to facilitate bleeding and actually teaches this on his DVD.Only primates have clavicles and cats have a rudimentary remnant one as vet students find to their cost when looking at X-rays under exam conditions.
    Thanks for that - I find sub-maxillary very hard to relate to, whereas sub-mandibular is clear as day. But then a degree in zoology probably means I'm just a bit thick!
    I never make the same mistake twice.

    I make it five or six times.

    Just to be sure.


  5. #5
    Sorry but during anatomy lectures all students are taught submandibular.The top jaw is the maxilla.Thank god we only had to listen to our lecturers.Incidently the submandibular glands are the ones that swell in mumps infections

  6. #6

  7. #7
    yep i think the term submaxillary is a load of rubbish unless someone can prove me wrong
    it means under the maxilla which is the palate and their aint no lymph nodes there

  8. #8

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by morena View Post
    Sorry but during anatomy lectures all students are taught submandibular.The top jaw is the maxilla.Thank god we only had to listen to our lecturers.Incidently the submandibular glands are the ones that swell in mumps infections
    I stand corrected sorry, my memory didn't serve me well.

  10. #10
    Well we are not training to be Vets or Zoologists,
    suffice to know if we skin away the lower jaw
    bone we should locate two neat glands (hopefully)
    underneath (sub) the jaw bone( mandible)

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