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Thread: Pitting on brand new DPT moderator

  1. #1

    Pitting on brand new DPT moderator

    Earlier this week a friend helped me zero a brand new Tikka T3x in .308 Win. On the end of the barrel was a new DPT moderator. I fired 57 shots. I took the mod off, followed the manufacturer's instructions and cleaned it in warm soapy water. There is some slight pitting on each of the sections of the moderator. Is this something that I should worry about?

    Apologies for the slightly blurred image but it's been very difficult to get it pin sharp.


  2. #2
    I should mention that:
    - I used a selection of factory ammo
    - I stopped shooting with ammo from one box of factory ammo (Remington Corelokt PSP) as it seemed to be leaving unignited powder in the barrel.

  3. #3
    Hi Nico, Can't offer an opinion on the pitting but I would be very interested to hear other opinions because I am just about to buy a DPT over barrel in .308. If you get any expert opinion from the place you purchased it or feedback from the manufacturer I would appreciate a PM.
    Cheers Jerry

  4. #4
    Nico

    I reckon it was the 2 rounds of dodgy Remington ammo... Mine has only had the 27 rounds through it on the bench next to you on Weds, and is showing no signs of anything at all.

    All - These 2 rounds of Remington had a completely different sound, and left what looked like sludge in the bottom of the barrel. Upon pushing a mop up, there was unburnt powder on the paper that we'd positioned under the end of the barrel. I've never seen anything like this so just a heads-up.

    Nico - Can you post the specifics of the ammo, inc. batch number and where you bought it from please.
    Sako 75 Syn/St 6.5x55mm - Swarovski Z6i 3-18x50. Beretta 690 III Field 12b.
    "You have enemies? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life."
    Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill (1874-1965)

  5. #5
    This is normal on all mods, ( most you do not see it as they don,t come apart ) contact the boys at DPT and all will be explained. Or look on NZHS forum In "DPT baffle corrosion " in the firearms, optics and accessories section, page 3. Hope this helps.

  6. #6
    I'm more interested in how it took 57 shots to zero, with help?
    Gas cutting is normal on alu mods, it's the tradeoff.
    Most have a limited lifetime guarantee, basically you get a discount on new baffles.

  7. #7
    I have one of the first prototype Roedale ultra light alu mods on my 308. I don't know but good 6 years. Shot couple competitions with it and use it for target practice as well as all my stalking. I have never taken it apart and it still seems to be as good as on the first day although I am sure she is well pitted inside. Especially alu mods start pitting with the first shot. One customer of ours had an alu mod on a 223 which was in a very bad condition after a bit over 1000 rounds.
    My suggestion.... don't take it apart, just shoot, maybe wash it out every now and then and spray with oil/wd40.
    edi

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Milligan View Post
    I'm more interested in how it took 57 shots to zero, with help?
    Gas cutting is normal on alu mods, it's the tradeoff.
    Most have a limited lifetime guarantee, basically you get a discount on new baffles.
    My initial thought also. I take it that there was a fair bit of shooting practise involved too and not 75 shots just to zero the rifle.

    Shooting that many rounds could generate a tremendous amount of extremely hot gasses causing more than usual pitting if the moderator isn't allowed to cool between strings. That's why many moderators have stainless steel baffles or at least the first baffle is stainless anyway. If I had a lightweight all aluminium moderator I would definitely be limiting the number of shots that I took before allowing the moderator to cool down to 3 shots. Which is what I would normally do anyway when zeroing or checking a load, and some of the baffles in my moderator are stainless steel.

    Nico is it possible for you to rotate the baffles around in your moderator (front to back and move one forward each time it is stripped) so as to even out the wear that they get?
    Last edited by 8x57; 01-05-2016 at 06:44.
    It's the calibre of the shooter that counts not the calibre of the rifle.

  9. #9
    I'd just put it back together, tape up the outside with cammo tape, and go shooting (and sleep at night). Modeartors are made this way because production is cheaper. They are not meant to be cleaned. The manufacturers use the cleaning ability as a selling point over non stripable units.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by 8x57 View Post
    My initial thought also. I take it that there was a fair bit of shooting practise involved too and not 75 shots just to zero the rifle.

    Shooting that many rounds could generate a tremendous amount of extremely hot gasses causing more than usual pitting if the moderator isn't allowed to cool between strings. That's why many moderators have stainless steel baffles or at least the first baffle is stainless anyway. If I had a lightweight all aluminium moderator I would definitely be limiting the number of shots that I took before allowing the moderator to cool down to 3 shots. Which is what I would normally do anyway when zeroing or checking a load, and some of the baffles in my moderator are stainless steel.

    Nico is it possible for you to rotate the baffles around in your moderator (front to back and move one forward each time it is stripped) so as to even out the wear that they get?
    You can fit a stainless baffle into a DPT , as recommended for magnum rounds

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