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Thread: 22-250 ingredients

  1. #1

    22-250 ingredients

    After the long wait my new sako 85 in 22-250 has arrived, I was also given a box of home loads to try and so am now in a position to go and buy my reloading ingredients, I have decided on 55 grain bullets but do not have any idea what make of brass or bullets and powder to get. My local shop stocks all the different powder and bullets but has only remington brass in stock, I am looking on a little advice on as to whether the remington brass would be OK and also what powder/ bullet combinations people are finding best, the rifle will hopefullt be accurate enough for some long range shooting?

  2. #2
    If the homeloads were developed for that rifle and work well, stick with that recipe. If they weren't then I wouldn't try them unless it was from a trusted source.

    I've always found Remington brass fine for reloads, as to the make/type of bullet, whats the intended use?

  3. #3
    Hi, they have come from a trusted friend but the 50 grain bullets once fired have split the end of the cases, I only fired a couple, as to the 55grain they seem fine and accurate but unsure of the powder brand although I do know that it was 36 grains and that they were Nosler BT. The rifles intended use will be longer range foxing and maybe the odd 400yard bunny?

  4. #4
    Buy some factory ammunition, 53g soft point from Norma. 25 a box. Awesome through my rifle. Sako 55g Gamehead pretty good too.

    You can always keep the brass from them if you want to reload.

    cjs

  5. #5
    I wouldn't buy new brass, too expensive given the lack of powder primer and bullet.

    Buy 100 rounds of good factory ammo in 55gr - Norma, RWS, Sako - something European. Shoot that until you have a 100 empty cases.

    Then get a tub of Benchmark (or your powder of choice), large rifle primers and some 55gr bullets - Nosler BT's, Hornady V Max or whatever.

    Then go and find someone to introduce you the joys of load development and reloading.

    If you are going to shoot less than 200 rounds per year, I would just buy factory ammo unless you really want to reload...
    Brian.

    Just because you are paranoid, doesn't mean they aren't out to get you......

  6. #6
    52gr AMax + CFE 223 worked up. BC helps a lot out past 300yds and the Amax is about as good as it gets in bullets that will stabilise in a 1-14 twist which I assume yours is? Hodgdonreloading.com will give you the starting load and max loads. Get a friend well versed in reloading to show you the ropes.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Wylyetom View Post
    Hi, they have come from a trusted friend but the 50 grain bullets once fired have split the end of the cases, I only fired a couple, as to the 55grain they seem fine and accurate but unsure of the powder brand although I do know that it was 36 grains and that they were Nosler BT. The rifles intended use will be longer range foxing and maybe the odd 400yard bunny?
    If they are splitting necks, avoid them, any quality 55gn bullet should do what you want, as you mention longer range also look at the ones that will work in your twist rate and have higher BC. Buy a box of PPU 55gn SP, if they group well they work out cheaper than reloading, if they don't you have once fired brass from your chamber that is good for reloads

  8. #8
    Tom,

    Fed or Lapua brass 55gr Sierra Blizkings and 35.5gr Varget or 38 gr H380 or 41 grains Superformance

  9. #9
    Thanks for all the advice,
    I have been reloading my .22 hornet for the last 6 months and have worked up to a load that works well, I bought some dies from this site a little while back so thought I would be better to reload as all I need is the consumables. The brass I have at the moment is remington but obviously I will no be using the split cases, so I might go and buy some factory Norma and then use these cases to reload from as I presume the cases will be of good quality.

  10. #10
    If you are splitting brass it is time to anneal the cases or bin them. Splitting is nothing to do with which bullet type you are shooting - Its all to do with the condition of the cases.
    The splitting is probably caused by cases resized & fired a few times or really poor quality original manufacture/material.

    Ian

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