Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Bet there's a lot of farms and foresters that would disagree with bds

  1. #1

    Bet there's a lot of farms and foresters that would disagree with bds

    "Unlike other species of deer in Britain, muntjac do not cause significant damage to agricultural or timber crops"

    Tanken for bds's description of muntjac

  2. #2
    SD Regular willie_gunn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Oxfordshire, Wiltshire, Berkshire....and Sutherland
    Posts
    6,995
    View my Gallery (19)View my Gallery (19)
    Quote Originally Posted by North Cornwall Deer View Post
    "Unlike other species of deer in Britain, muntjac do not cause significant damage to agricultural or timber crops"

    Tanken for bds's description of muntjac
    Why?

    Being primarily browsers, and compared to roe, muntjac are going to have less of an impact on young plantations, at least if the trees are fitted with bunny wraps or tree guards.

    At least from my anecdotal observations muntjac are not hitting arable in any big way.

    Compare that to the damage from the grazing species and it's hard not to agree with BDS' assessment.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us to see oursels as ithers see us!

  3. #3
    rabbits hares squirrels and voles probably do more damage.

    Most impact is where they have never been culled ( nature reserves)
    A combination of muntjac in high densities and lack of proper management
    (coppicing and thinning) can result in a denuded ground flora.

    They can provide many of us the opportunity for free or inexpensive stalking
    and good venison (unless of course you pay for trophy heads)

  4. #4
    Muntjac are more prone to eat low level foliage. I have never seen any significant damage to trees, however where they occur in very large numbers I dare say they would be more inclined to damage young trees if they were left unguarded or newly planted hedgerow would also be open to attack.

    However Muntjac are a problem in areas with delicate low level plant life and wild flowers and can do considerable damage to wild flower growth if left unchecked in my opinion.
    All grades of deer stalkers/hunters in the UK and overseas catered for. Level 2 DMQ signing off available. Over 30 years experience in the stalking/hunting industry. For friendly and professional help go to www.UKOutfitters.co.uk

    ZEISS PRO STALKER.

  5. #5
    SD Regular willie_gunn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Oxfordshire, Wiltshire, Berkshire....and Sutherland
    Posts
    6,995
    View my Gallery (19)View my Gallery (19)
    Quote Originally Posted by sikamalc View Post
    Muntjac are more prone to eat low level foliage. I have never seen any significant damage to trees, however where they occur in very large numbers I dare say they would be more inclined to damage young trees if they were left unguarded or newly planted hedgerow would also be open to attack.

    However Muntjac are a problem in areas with delicate low level plant life and wild flowers and can do considerable damage to wild flower growth if left unchecked in my opinion.
    That I agree with 100%.

    Muntjac cause considerable ecological damage, particularly to bluebells, honeysuckle, etc. Also at high densities they can have a significant impact on hazel coppicing, as we found on our old shoot near Oxford. That wood also held significant numbers of fallow, as a result of which there was a clear browse line up to about 6 foot as well as significant damage to the surrounding farm crops.
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us to see oursels as ithers see us!

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by sikamalc View Post
    Muntjac are more prone to eat low level foliage. I have never seen any significant damage to trees, however where they occur in very large numbers I dare say they would be more inclined to damage young trees if they were left unguarded or newly planted hedgerow would also be open to attack.

    However Muntjac are a problem in areas with delicate low level plant life and wild flowers and can do considerable damage to wild flower growth if left unchecked in my opinion.
    Spot on Malc,

    When i was managing deer in Norfolk where we had a reasonably high population there was still minimal damage to anything from crops to ground flora. My mother carries out biological surveys for several Norfolk estates, some that cull and some that don't. I would say they need to be in very high density to course real damage.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by sikamalc View Post
    Muntjac are more prone to eat low level foliage. I have never seen any significant damage to trees, however where they occur in very large numbers I dare say they would be more inclined to damage young trees if they were left unguarded or newly planted hedgerow would also be open to attack.

    However Muntjac are a problem in areas with delicate low level plant life and wild flowers and can do considerable damage to wild flower growth if left unchecked in my opinion.
    +1 and thats what the BDS page goes on to say - here's the full paragraph:

    Unlike other species of deer in Britain, muntjac do not cause significant damage to agricultural or timber crops. However, high densities may prevent coppice regeneration and the loss of some plants of conservation importance, such as primulas. Muntjac trophy hunting has only recently become popular so there is little tradition of muntjac stalking on country and forest estates. The most significant direct economic impact that muntjac have on human interests is in collisions with cars. However, this has welfare as well as economic implications.

  8. #8
    Trouble is there are 3 sorts of farmers.

    1. No I do not want anyone shooting on my land, my wife likes to see the deer and I don't want anyone on here.

    2. No I already have my twice removed cousin who is ex SAS sniper and he keeps the deer numbers down. (yeah right, I wish I had a fiver for every time I have heard that remark)

    3. Yes shoot every single one of them you see, they eat all my trees and crops, BUT I already have someone shooting them and I don't see him very often but permission is his and therefore I cannot help you.

    I am sure there are other remarks one hears. However as said unless there are large numbers of Muntjac they do not do that much damage to crops or trees.

    What I will say is that one of the farms I have which does have both Muntjac and CWD does back onto two very large forests with no one allowed to shoot them. When I first got the area I had not seen Muntjac slots like it since I stalked many years ago on Boughton Estate.

    Tikka 308 on this site will back me up.

    The farmer on the ground I had planted oil seed rape around these woods, and although the pigeons had been hammering it, the Muntjac hade really hammered it. In ONE evening from ONE high seat I counted 18 Muntjac in the corner of the field and took 2 Muntjac and a CWD with an overseas client.
    So in that instance yes they had done some damage.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	WP_20150210_003.jpg 
Views:	95 
Size:	300.1 KB 
ID:	70193


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC_1966.jpg 
Views:	120 
Size:	352.8 KB 
ID:	70194

    Later on in early March I invited 3 good mates up for 2 days and we took 9 Muntjac.

    ATB

    Malc
    All grades of deer stalkers/hunters in the UK and overseas catered for. Level 2 DMQ signing off available. Over 30 years experience in the stalking/hunting industry. For friendly and professional help go to www.UKOutfitters.co.uk

    ZEISS PRO STALKER.

  9. #9
    I do a lot of Deer impact assessment work now and muntjac regularly come up as the species doing the most damage. However, they do not cause much of a problem to agricultural crops or planted trees with suitable guards. But.... they can cause significant damage to unprotected coppice stools and natural regeneration which are both forms of timber crop. Muntjac in numbers are extremely destructive, although the damage is not entirely evident. Muntjac will eventually strip the understorey completely out of a wood in a gradual process. The wood may not look damaged to the untrained eye, but there will be nothing growing below about 2 foot high. It doesn't sound a lot, but this is where most woodland wildlife and plant species live and feed. Any wood with a good population of muntjac will be in a state of gradual degeneration. This will have serious consequences to the biodiversity of that woodland, which may take decades to recover, and only if the muntjac are eradicated to a point where their impact becomes negligible.
    Malc - Boughton estate now has very few muntjac slots on it
    MS

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by willie_gunn View Post
    That I agree with 100%.

    Muntjac cause considerable ecological damage, particularly to bluebells, honeysuckle, etc. Also at high densities they can have a significant impact on hazel coppicing, as we found on our old shoot near Oxford. That wood also held significant numbers of fallow, as a result of which there was a clear browse line up to about 6 foot as well as significant damage to the surrounding farm crops.
    agreed
    resident munty populations held at a sustainable leval are still good to see in our woodland however high levels of fallow resident and transient cause far more damage and are IMO harder to manage .I can easy set my stall out to reduce an area of muntys not so easy with the fallow though eh altogether a different ball game !

    Norma
    Last edited by norma 308; 19-05-2016 at 07:35.

Similar Threads

  1. Foresters stick (variant)
    By OSS32 in forum Equipment & Accessories
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 27-05-2012, 16:02
  2. New Farms....Up date
    By Tim.243 in forum Legal Issues
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 27-11-2011, 20:32
  3. New Farms
    By Tim.243 in forum Legal Issues
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 24-10-2011, 11:26
  4. Losing lease to wind farms
    By Range Master in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 17-06-2011, 12:15
  5. Wind Farms
    By KevinF in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-04-2010, 22:37

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •