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Thread: Field of view

  1. #1

    Field of view

    Ok
    can anyone explain field of view please
    ?
    10x42
    8x42
    8x56
    15x56
    i don't really understand with the binoculars to be fair
    cheers

  2. #2
    Best to have two or more sets of different magnification and/or lense size to hand. Pick an object in the distance, and while staying stationary looking at that, see how far either side of it you can see with each pair.
    I'm sure a proper technical explanation will follow..

  3. #3
    Imagine when you look through a pair of binoculars you essentially see everything in a cone shape that starts narrowest at your eye and gets wider the further away you look. The field of view is the diameter of the widest part of the cone at the target. It is generally expressed in terms of metres at 100m. If you have a FOV of 10m at 100m then the distance from far left of the picture to the far right of the picture will be 10m at a distance of 100m. This is not related to the specification of the binoculars that you mention where a 7x42 set of binoculars has a magnification of 7 times with an objective lens diameter of 42mm

  4. #4
    Field of view is the distance from edge to edge of the image, at x distance.

    But, in my eyes, AFOV is MUCH more important. Actual Field of View, can be different from binocular to binocular.

    Easiest to explain is this:

    Imagine looking at two televison sets, 3 meters awey. One is a 42" the other a 55". Both are showing the same program ( this is FOV ).
    But, everything looks larger on the 55". Right? (This is AFOV)

    The FOV can show 130m at 1000 meters, but the size of the image you are looking at can be different, because of eyepiece build up and design parameters.



    I ALWAYS choose the binocular with the largest AFOV, as it gives me much more information, because what you are looking at, is larger.


    The easiest way of measuring AFOV, is multiplying the magnification x degrees of FOV. Not correct, but will give you an estimate.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Northman_83 View Post
    Field of view is the distance from edge to edge of the image, at x distance.

    But, in my eyes, AFOV is MUCH more important. Actual Field of View, can be different from binocular to binocular.

    Easiest to explain is this:

    Imagine looking at two televison sets, 3 meters awey. One is a 42" the other a 55". Both are showing the same program ( this is FOV ).
    But, everything looks larger on the 55". Right? (This is AFOV)

    The FOV can show 130m at 1000 meters, but the size of the image you are looking at can be different, because of eyepiece build up and design parameters.



    I ALWAYS choose the binocular with the largest AFOV, as it gives me much more information, because what you are looking at, is larger.


    The easiest way of measuring AFOV, is multiplying the magnification x degrees of FOV. Not correct, but will give you an estimate.

    Thanks for that explanation, I have often wondered why looking through 2 scopes with the same magnification, why one seems to be a higher mag than the other as the sight picture is bigger. Of course the answer is that; one scope IS showing a bigger picture than the other.

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