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Thread: Getting fit for the hills

  1. #1

    Getting fit for the hills

    Does anyone have any good ideas about how to get fit for the hills when you live in an area where there are no hills?

  2. #2
    Yes, it's challenging & an issue I have as I don't necessarily have time to jump in the car & drive for miles just to walk the dog & keep fit. What I do to help for this is walk briskly carrying a weighted well-fitting pack. 2 litre water-bottles are ideal and you can build up to the target weight (& if it gets too much you can tip some out). I try to do 10k with 10kg at least a couple of times a week but nothing beats actually going hill-walking when you can. I find it more helpful (& less damaging to my back) to walk further with a modest load than try to walk for a shorter distance with a heavier load.

    I suppose if you wanted to get really serious & be the laughing stock of your locality you could tie bungee cords between your legs for extra resistance.....
    Last edited by McKenzie; 02-08-2016 at 06:43.

  3. #3
    Had to walk back to the car at the top of a steep car park yesterday. Thought I was having a heart attack. Reckon it's time to get back on the spinner & rower before my November trip. I usually find a few weeks of decent cardio vascular on these 2 machines (30 minutes steady sessions on each every other day) plus some lengthy walks gets me back to a point where I can survive a full week on the hill. If nothing else it keeps me ahead of the rest of the guys in the group who are 8 years younger.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by polranny View Post
    Does anyone have any good ideas about how to get fit for the hills when you live in an area where there are no hills?

    Move...........
















    Best guess would to visit a local gym and ask them, my manual job keeps very active also out foxing on foot, beating, wildfowling (that gets the heart rate up getting out and back) rough shooting and out with the Spaniel!!

    I do notice some of the wildfowling members who work in offices on work parties and setting up our summer clay shoots running out of steam quite quickly.

    Tim.243
    Stalking is very much like going to the night club

    You can always tell an Essex Boy, just you cant tell him much...

    An hour in the field is worth a week of typing trash.....




  5. #5
    If you are a gym member then get on the running machine at around 5KPH and crank the incline up to 12-15%. Power walk on that for 20 minutes or so, that will work a sweat up hehe! You can also wear a weighted pack while you do this.

    The other good gym machine is the Stair Master, and again 20 minutes on that (you can also set it up for intervals with slower and faster paces) will get your heart going.

    I usually do both at the gym - The power walking gives you stamina, and then the interval training has the benefit of reducing your recovery time between intense bouts of exercise.

    If you dont have gym membership then climbing up stairs in a tall building or car park would help, and as others have suggested get out walking with a weighted pack on.

    I'm in this boat too as I'm up to Scotland next year and I want to have my cardio up to scratch when I go!

  6. #6
    Its all about pacing yourself, no good trying to be man mountain and walking at a pace that wears you out to the point where you cant hold the rifle steady when you are on a beast.
    I find coming down hill harder than going up, mainly because my knees are not good. Don't carry to much crap with you either. Good waterproof and wind proof coat, trousers, good walking boots, gaiters, hat, gloves, knife, rifle, ammo, binoculars, drag rope, chocolate and a bottle of water. Many clients bring the kitchen sink with them, so keep it light and sensible.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by sikamalc View Post
    Its all about pacing yourself, no good trying to be man mountain and walking at a pace that wears you out to the point where you cant hold the rifle steady when you are on a beast.
    I find coming down hill harder than going up, mainly because my knees are not good. Don't carry to much crap with you either. Good waterproof and wind proof coat, trousers, good walking boots, gaiters, hat, gloves, knife, rifle, ammo, binoculars, drag rope, chocolate and a bottle of water. Many clients bring the kitchen sink with them, so keep it light and sensible.
    As said - slow and steady, and not carrying too much. I keep fit by running, 15 to 20 miles a week. When out on the hills, whether it's foxing or otherwise, it's all at a nice slow pace.

    There's a saying in high-altitude mountaineering : every step, take a small break. Following the same advice stalking on the hill isn't a bad idea.

  8. #8
    Weighted pack and wear out your stairs carpet, after a couple of weeks only use every other tread
    In order to get the strength and endurance to do something you either have to do it or mimic it to the best of your ability that's why boxers don't do ballet training "if you get my point" both are very physically demanding but in very different areas.
    Regards
    Jimmy
    Next time you're walking down the street and see a homeless person go buy them a sandwich and a coffee, change of fate and it could be you one day !!!

    BUY BRITISH !!!!

  9. #9
    I am getting in shape for Montana, but although i have hills, i can't do anything about the altitude.
    All i can suggest is some running, and walking with weights, i put 4 pint milk containers in my rucksack filled with water, and as you get fitter increase the amount you carry.
    Squats with weights will help also.

    It is helping, i bumped some fallow yesterday (well actually the noisy cows frightened them) and they ran over a hill, i followed, running, i almost got the crosshairs on one as it went in the wood, i couldn't have done that 6 months ago, not bad for 56 years!

    Cheers
    Richard

  10. #10
    stairs stairs n more stairs ,back in the day when playing rugby we used to carry a pack and go up and down every set of stairs we could find.It hurts at first but you notice the changes as the training goes on.You can get ankle weights like joggists use but dont overdo it and warm up first.
    she buys shoes i buy ,shooting,she stops buying shoes,il be amazed

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