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Thread: What a plonker!!!

  1. #1

    What a plonker!!!

    got the rings and bases for the 223 tikka (not put a round through it yet) clamped my trusty pro-stalk scope and disappeared up the farm to zero said tikka, set my target board at 75 yards, made sure there was a good backstop, fired my first shot, sh*t, it was miles out !!! (I'd centred the cross hairs after removing scope from the 17), went to adjust the cross hairs - shock, horror - when I'd mounted the scope I'd managed to get it 90 degrees out and hadn't got an allen key to put it right -b*gger, b*gger, b*gger -, anyway I fired a few shots, some hornady 40 gr v max and a few sako 50gr sp, the 40's were OK but the 50,s had flattened the primer good and proper, is this the norm or what ? Callie

  2. #2
    DO NOT FIRE ANY MORE.
    Refer back to your loading data.
    check C.O.L. and back of the powder charge.
    If its factory don't buy anymore and give those to someone whos rifle will fire them saftley

  3. #3
    Could have been easier if you had bore sighted it .Not to mention safer for those in the area .

  4. #4
    thanks for the advice :- have just noticed what appears to be a slight swelling ( can't feel it with finger nail though ) about 10 mm up from base of cartridge, they are factory loads, think I'll take them back to the shop, batteries flat in camera so cant show you a pic callie

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by www.yorkshireroestalking. View Post
    DO NOT FIRE ANY MORE.
    Refer back to your loading data.
    check C.O.L. and back of the powder charge.
    If its factory don't buy anymore and give those to someone whos rifle will fire them saftley
    As above post, do you reload yourself? flattened primers are a sign of high pressure, don't fire any more of those bullets, also note you had good backstop ref the mis aligned cross-hairs, we all live and learn by our mistakes. Welcome to the site deerwarden.

  6. #6
    What your describing is the pressure ring. the base of the cartridge is smaller, has to be, than the chamber. Without seeing them and measuring them one cannot say if they are too hot for your rifle or your rifle has a largish chamber. Flattened primers don't mean much a sit depend on the primer cup material. i have an article for Pedersens Rifle shooter somewhere where it has several cartridges side by side and the primers look very similar yet one lad showed a pressure reading of over 80,000 psi. Then went up clear to 100,000 psi before they got a loose primer pocket. of course this was in a pressure barrel in a lab but it shows that trying to read pressures by looking at primers is a futile exercise.

  7. #7
    widows son:- you're right I should've done, I've since bore sighted it but cant zero proper until thursday, back stop is 12 to 15 foot high and nobody around for miles , I did check. callie

  8. #8
    deerwarden:- not reloading at present but willdo in the future, got a lot of reading and re-reading to do before I attempt to reload. callie

  9. #9
    just as by line I did hit the board, a piece of MDF, 3ft by 2ft with three targets pinned to it, my first shot was 10 ins wide and 18 ins low. callie

  10. #10
    Just guessing here but dont you mean 180 degrees?

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