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Thread: That time of year again - log burner Q

  1. #1

    That time of year again - log burner Q

    After some advice / tips. To keep the log burner going over night.
    Not sure of exact make but is rated as 5KW, has 2 air intakes, 1 front at the bottom that takes air in below the grate if closed the burn slows down but a large hardwood log will be gone in 4-5 hours. 2 at the top front and is an air wash system to keep the glass clean. If I close this as well the log will last over night easily but the glass is a bitch to clean.
    So what I'm after is a way of slowing down the burn while keeping the glass clean? Or an easy way to clean the hot glass.
    unless you can prove it beyond all reasonable doubt, it wasn't me. If you can prove it then you must be mistaken

  2. #2
    Wake up in night with full bladder. Have pee....... In toilet. Warning, do not pee in bed or you will not get to sleep for at least a week as other half will go on about it.
    Then fill log fire. Return to bed. Repeat as necessary.
    If done correctly you can get female to do it also so you do not disturb your sleep.

    works for me but I'm thinking my bladder is shrinking in my dotage.
    I can speak in-depth and with great knowledge about most subjects until some bugger who actually knows what he is speaking about opens his gob .

  3. #3
    We put coal on ours to keep it in overnight....wood through day then chuck half a bucket of coal on at bed time

  4. #4
    What hardwood are you burning? I was burning some Hawthorn last winter and it was lasting about 6 hours in the burner.

    Andy7mm
    "Amazing things can happen when preparation meet opportunity" Richard Schatz


    "The will to win, compares little with the will to prepare to win" Donovan Moran

  5. #5
    Is it just a log burner or a multi fuel stove ?

    Multi fuel usually have a grate and vent below for use on coal as well as vent up top for use on wood

    If you are only burning wood then it should be on a bed of ash and with the bottom vent shut (as this is for the coal burn rate) and the top vent to control the flow

    For overnight with ours on wood only we need a good bed of hot embers and usually stack it full squeezing a log in every gap it will go into until the firebox is full, then shut all vents off completely and it is usually a nice bed of embers by the morning which flare up once the top vent is opened and another couple of logs are put on

    For wood only late nights and early mornings are usually necessary to keep on top of them

    If it is multi fuel which it sounds like then try coal overnight instead

    Rake embers over so you have airflow shut top vent totally fill with coal and leave bottom vent open a couple of mm to keep airflow and coal burning usually lasts about 2-3 hours longer overnight in our burner on coal than on wood




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    hope the wood / log poem helps
    Alder Produces poor heat output and it does not last well. Poor
    Apple A very good wood that bums slow and steady when dry, it has small flame size, and does not produce sparking or spitting. Good
    Ash Reckoned by many to be one of best woods for burning, it produces a steady flame and good heat output. It can be burnt when green but like all woods, it burns best when dry. Very good
    Beech Burns very much like ash, but does not burn well when green. Very good
    Birch Produces good heat output but it does burn quickly. It can be burnt unseasoned, however the sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use. Good
    Cedar Is a good burning wood that produces a consistent and long heat output. It burns with a small flame, but does tend to crackle and spit and the sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use. Good
    Cherry Is a slow to burn wood that produces a good heat output. Cherry needs to be seasoned well. Good
    Chestnut A poor burning wood that produces a small flame and poor heat output. Poor
    Firs (Douglas etc) A poor burning wood that produces a small flame and poor heat output and the sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use. Poor
    Elm Is a wood that can follow several burn patterns because of high moisture content, it should be dried for two years for best results. Elm is slow to get going and it may be necessary to use a better burning wood to start it off. Splitting of logs should be done early. Medium
    Eucalyptus Is a fast burning wood. The sap can cause deposits to form in the flue and can increase the risk of a chimney fire if burned unseasoned. Poor
    Hawthorn Is a good traditional firewood that has a slow burn with good heat output. Very good
    Hazel Is a good but fast burning wood and produces best results when allowed to season. Good
    Holly Is a fast burning wood that produces good flame but poor heat output. Holly will burn green, but best dried for a minimum of a year. Poor
    Hornbeam A good burning wood that burns similar to beech, slow burn with a good heat output. Good
    Horse Chestnut A good wood for burning in wood stoves but not for open fires as it does tend to spit a lot. It does however produce a good flame and heat output. Good (For stoves only)
    Laburnum A very smokey wood with a poor burn. Poor do not use
    Larch Produces a reasonable heat output, but it needs to be well seasoned. The sap can cause deposits to form in the flue with prolonged use. Medium
    Laurel Burns with a good flame but only reasonable heat output. It needs to be well seasoned. Medium
    Lilac Its smaller branches are good to use as kindling, the wood itself burns well with a good flame. Good
    Maple Is a good burning wood that produces good flame and heat output. Good
    Oak Because of its density, oak produces a small flame and very slow burn, it is best when seasoned for a minimum of two years as it is a wood that requires time to season well. Good
    Pear Burns well with good heat output, however it does need to be seasoned well. Good
    Pine (Including Leylandii) Burns with a good flame, but the resin sap can cause deposits to form in the flue and can increase the risk of a chimney fire must be well seasoned. Good (with caution)
    Plum A good burning wood that produces good heat output. Good
    Poplar A very smokey wood with a poor burn. Very poor
    Rowan Is a good burning wood that has a slow burn with good heat output. Very good
    Robinia (Acacia) Is a good burning wood that has a slow burn with good heat output. It does produce an acrid and dense smoke but this is of course not a problem in a stove. Good (For Stoves only)
    Spruce Produces a poor heat output and it does not last well. Poor
    Sycamore Produces a good flame, but with only moderate heat output. Should only be used well-seasoned. Medium
    Sweet Chestnut The wood burns ok when well-seasoned but it does tend to spit a lot. This is of course not a problem in a stove. Medium (For Stoves only)
    Thorn Is one of the best woods for burning. It produces a steady flame and very good heat output, and produces very little smoke. Very good
    Willow A poor fire wood that does not burn well even when seasoned. Poor
    Yew A good burning wood as it has a slow burn, and produces a very good heat output. Very good

  7. #7
    Mr muscle oven cleaner will clean your glass, you could always fit a dampener to the flue but I think your best bet is coal over night.
    "A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory." LLAP Leonard Nimoy 1931 - 2015

  8. #8
    I use coal when it is bitterly cold to keep the fire in overnight. As far as cleaning the glass, woodash out of the fire on a damp cloth then a polish with newspaper works fine for me.

  9. #9
    Special glass cleaner from any wood burning fire specialist, one squirt immediately takes all the gunge off the glass.
    Remove the grate if only burning wood and use 1" of sand instead to burn the logs on.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy7mm View Post
    What hardwood are you burning? I was burning some Hawthorn last winter and it was lasting about 6 hours in the burner.

    Andy7mm
    Burning what ever I managed to source over last couple of years. Loads of Beech some Holly & Birch & a bit of Hawthorn. Most is soft wood used during the day

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