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Thread: Am I being nieve?

  1. #1

    Am I being nieve?

    A quick question that I thought I knew the answer of , but recent activities have proven otherwise.If your picked up a bit of stalking and your landowner said, so and so who owns the next door ground wouldn't mind if you went around their land, would you speak to the neighbouring farmer first to check or just go on your landowners say. In the last month ive met three people on my area all of which have said next door said it would be ok,my landowner has spoken to those concerned who have been lucky enough to be just be told to f555 off but it could have ended much worse...................

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by ruby tuesday View Post
    A quick question that I thought I knew the answer of , but recent activities have proven otherwise.If your picked up a bit of stalking and your landowner said, so and so who owns the next door ground wouldn't mind if you went around their land, would you speak to the neighbouring farmer first to check or just go on your landowners say. In the last month ive met three people on my area all of which have said next door said it would be ok,my landowner has spoken to those concerned who have been lucky enough to be just be told to f555 off but it could have ended much worse...................
    NEVER go onto anyone's ground now unless I have a piece of paper saying I have authorization to do that - many years ago I went to see who I thought was the farmer to ask permission to be told yes that's fine - two weeks later I was stopped by the farmer, who asked me what I thought I was doing.... explained the situation to him and I had knocked at the house and the chap had come out the garage and said that was fine..... turned out this chap was a hired farm hand.....

  3. #3
    I'd go to the farm in question, introduce myself and explain that I shoot X,Y & Z on (name of land owner) next door. He said it would be ok to cross the boundary and shoot this side also. I just wanted to check this was the case and if you had any special requirements while I was shooting. E.g. Time / location what to or not to shoot etc.
    Worst case is get told to pi$$ off
    Wingy

  4. #4
    Always Always Always get permission from the land owner, preferably in writing

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Wingy View Post
    I'd go to the farm in question, introduce myself and explain that I shoot X,Y & Z on (name of land owner) next door. He said it would be ok to cross the boundary and shoot this side also. I just wanted to check this was the case and if you had any special requirements while I was shooting. E.g. Time / location what to or not to shoot etc.
    Worst case is get told to pi$$ off
    Wingy
    what he said.
    I can speak in-depth and with great knowledge about most subjects until some bugger who actually knows what he is speaking about opens his gob .

  6. #6
    I did as above in god knows how long the land has been shot over no one had thought of asking the farm thats closest if there where any runners/injured or problem deer or vermin was it ok to pop over to sort it ,the land is forestry but borders wide open fields,i asked if he had any concerns at all he laughed and said just shoot more of the things.and thanks for asking.
    DONT START

  7. #7
    Armed Trespass carries a maximum sentence of 7 years...

    I'd not want to get into an argument over "he said, she said" when stopped by Police on land that I don't have permission to shoot on, with 5 rounds of 140gr 6.5x55mm in the magazine
    Sako 75 6.5x55mm - Z6i 3-18x50. Sako P94S .22lr
    "You have enemies? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life."
    Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill (1874-1965)

  8. #8
    I encountered a slightly different, though related situation some years ago. I shot over a large mixed farm (dairy, beef, sheep, cereals, root-crops and greens) for 40 odd years (game, wildfowl and vermin....no deer).
    I was out lamping one night for rabbits when I came across a pheasant feeder......I had no feeders in that area! On the following morning I spoke to the owner (a personal friend) and he said "oh, they will be such and such's feeders". I said I was unaware they had permission to shoot there. He then said he'd sold that piece of ground a 'while back', had he not mentioned it!!! NO HE HADN'T!!!
    I'd been wandering about there with rifle and shotgun and fortunately never been confronted with a rather embarrassing situation.

  9. #9
    I learned a very similar lesson a few years ago. I asked a land owner if I could have permission to shoot deer on his land and he was more than happy to let me. "The keeper will show you what's what" He said. I went round with the keeper about a week or so later and got the boundaries settled in my head and then started shooting the land. It was about a year later, I'd parked up my car and was just crossing a field to get to where I wanted to stalk when the farmer from the "neighbouring" farm stopped me and asked what I was doing on his land with a rifle. This left me very wrong footed and I explained the situation, and where I was going. What the keeper had failed to mention was that his patch included both farms, and although he'd set me boundaries in his initial briefing, those boundaries included a couple of fields belonging to the neighbour. I was fortunate that this went no further and we parted on good terms, it could have ended very differently.
    In answer to the original question, I'd definitely check with the neighbour first; and if it's an employee that explains your boundaries to you, double check them with the owner.
    Last edited by Harry mac; 29-12-2016 at 08:36.
    You can't say muntjac without saying, Mmmmmm.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by ruby tuesday View Post
    A quick question that I thought I knew the answer of , but recent activities have proven otherwise.If your picked up a bit of stalking and your landowner said, so and so who owns the next door ground wouldn't mind if you went around their land, would you speak to the neighbouring farmer first to check or just go on your landowners say. In the last month ive met three people on my area all of which have said next door said it would be ok,my landowner has spoken to those concerned who have been lucky enough to be just be told to f555 off but it could have ended much worse...................
    Never believe the 'it will be OK to pop onto my neighbours land' promise.
    And never believe that your 'landowner' is indeed the landowner - I know of cases and been shooting myself on land for years where tenant farmers, who do not hold the game/deer shooting rights, have given 'permission' on 'their' land which is not their land and not their permission to give.
    It is not necessarily malicious, but simply a case of the tenant not knowing/understanding the difference between vermin shooting rights and game/deer shooting rights.
    If and when I was confronted by the real landowner a simply apology from my side and explaining how the misunderstanding has arisen has been enough to get the proper permission from the real owner. Most people are perfectly reasonable after all.

    A Land Registry search will give you peace of mind that your landowner is indeed the landowner, and is simple and cheap to do online.
    • Do not be seduced by the marketing-men....

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