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Thread: How's this for a bore guide?

  1. #1

    How's this for a bore guide?

    Just want some comments on my crude bore guide. It's too cartridges fired from this rifle but unsized (so the patches aren't too tight) with the heads cut off and soldered together in a straight line. The holes at the end are so I can extract it if it gets stiff for some reason. I gave it a thourough cleaning after making it.

    I'm not looking for congrats, just some opinions on whether it'll save the start of the rifling (what's that area called after the breach where the rifling starts?) or I should just stop being stingy and buy a proper one?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails P1000260.JPG   P1000261.JPG  
    "A man can never have too much red wine, too many books, or too much ammunition." -- Rudyard Kipling

  2. #2
    It looks like it should prevent damage to the parts you are looking to protect, BUT, if you are looking to use some of the preparations that dissolve copper / brass & alloys thereof, you may want to revert to a proprietary plastic or nylon one!
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  3. #3
    hmm, good point. Now that's what you call forward thinking...

    Although, it would still work wouldn't it? It's just that it would always show I have a copper fouled barrel...

    OK so what's the best value bore guide for a mauser 98 in 243?
    "A man can never have too much red wine, too many books, or too much ammunition." -- Rudyard Kipling

  4. #4
    actually having a rethink it might not matter. If I patched the solvent in, took the 'bore guide' out, dried it, then when patching out the solvent it won't be hitting solvent coated cartridge, only dry. So no worries?

    Or if I use say wipe-out (the spray one) and patch it out that would be ok too wouldn't it?
    "A man can never have too much red wine, too many books, or too much ammunition." -- Rudyard Kipling

  5. #5
    i think that area you refer to is called the Lans

    steve

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by musty View Post
    i think that area you refer to is called the Lans

    steve
    The area directly in front of the chamber is the leade or throat. The lands are the the areas between the grooves. Of course some rifles also have free bore where the lands are reamed out to allow the bullet some movement forwards before it hits the leade/throat. Weatherby has this feature on rifles chambered for their own cartridges which can be detrimental to the accuracy or precision of grouping but is needed to reduce pressures.

    Bore guides are not new unlike so seem to think. Parker-Hale for one made them from hard wood turned to fit the Lee Enfield and Pattern 14 Enfield (No3) and also the Mauser 98 action it could be had as a solid or split and they also made an adjustable rod stop to fit onto the cleaning rod. it seems these bench rest shooters did not think these things up after all but just appropriated the idea and claimed it as their own. Oh and seating the bullet into the rifling is not new either. Halford, Metford and shooters like them were doing it for the very first days of breech loading and several companies made "breech seating tools".

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Brithunter View Post
    Parker-Hale for one made them from hard wood turned to fit the Lee Enfield and Pattern 14 Enfield (No3) and also the Mauser 98 action it could be had as a solid or split and they also made an adjustable rod stop to fit onto the cleaning rod.
    I like these ideas, time to get the lathe going and use some of those lignum vitae or boxwood blanks I've got lying around!
    "A man can never have too much red wine, too many books, or too much ammunition." -- Rudyard Kipling

  8. #8
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    i wouldnt say it matters how long it lasts its cheep to make great idea i think
    Quote Originally Posted by harrygrey382 View Post
    I like these ideas, time to get the lathe going and use some of those lignum vitae or boxwood blanks I've got lying around!

  9. #9
    Hello Brithunter. Question. I've read about varying opinions regarding pressure in chambers caused by allowing the bullet to contact or begin to engrave onto the rifling before ignition. Is this dictated by the type of bullet and powder combination used ?

    Did, for instance, black powder have a different pressure peak in the first breechloaders which allowed the bullet to engrave into the rifling without undue pressure.

    It's one of the many things I have never explored and it would be nice to have a straightforward answer.

    Thanks in anticipation.

    K.

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