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Thread: A disappointment.

  1. #1

    A disappointment.

    I took a plane flight to my brothers home in Massachusetts this past weekend and one of my chores while there was to inspect and pack five rifles I bought from him. The #1 rifle of the bunch is a 1895 Winchester in 30-06. The rifle was described as having a great bore but unfortunately, that was a slightly uneducated opinion. I found it rusted badly: probably from old service ammo and no cleaning. It is positively black. Likewise, the Remington pump rifle in 30 Remington is also a bit shady. I was disappointed but figure that they will probably shoot well regardless of the corrosion, and may polish up a bit in the process. If not, the Winchester will be bored and re-rifled to .323" and an 8mm-06 made of it. I have made several rifles in this caliber and have reamers and dies already. The Remington pump rifle is of no interest to me so it will be sold off with full disclosure to a collector.

    A sparkling note is the 12 ga. 1897 Winchester (take-down) pump shotgun which was in excellent condition and the Lyman 50 cal muzzle loader, also in excellent condition. The best of the lot is an 11mm 71/84 Mauser that is positively new and unfired.

    As I said, the 1895 was a disappointment but it can be reworked and for $160 US it was a deal not to be missed no matter what the bore condition.~Muir

  2. #2
    Hi Muir, is the 11mm Mauser one of the refurbished ones that Gibbs Rifle Company was offering over there a few years ago? Of course all the collectors were screaming that they'd ruined collectable rifles by tarting them up, but the way I saw it they'd taken a pile of worm eaten, world weary rifles and turned them into nice shooters.
    Last edited by Harry mac; 26-07-2010 at 18:48. Reason: Punctuation.
    You can't say muntjac without saying, Mmmmmm.

  3. #3
    No, this one is one of the many thousands of stock 11mm military rifles that populated the New England states after WWII. When I was a kid the nearest "sporting goods" store had a barrel full of greasy, new, 11mm Mausers that could be had for $15 with two boxes of surplus, black powder 11MM ammo. For $18 the shop would substitute a box of Canadian "Dominion" brand sporting ammunition for the two boxes of surplus ammo. Oddly, the state I lived in (Massachusetts) would only allow shotgun for deer so I can't imagine where these guys were using these Mausers as cheap hunting rifles. Probably in Vermont, a couple of hours north.

    This Mauser is really fine. Some very minor patchiness to the bluing on the barrel and a few handling nicks in the stock, but otherwise it's an unfired, 1888 dated Spandau. I currently load and shoot 11mm. I have a 71/84 sporting rifle with a 6 shot magazine and my son has a 1871 Mauser Military single shot. Both are very accurate. I have a small supply of Dominion brass but I also have brass formed from 348 Winchester brass (lathe turned rims) that works quite well. I use a .446" RCBS cast bullet. I have read in places that the Model 1871 had a .451" groove diameter but this is not so with my son's rifle.~Muir
    Last edited by Muir; 26-07-2010 at 22:25.

  4. #4
    Muir - I wish there were some some smiths in this country who could rebore barrels and breath new life into otherwise good rifles - yes you can rebarrel old manlichers etc, but you cant then replace all the sights etc etc.

    Indeed there are plenty of really nice 243s with partly worn barrels that could be just taken up to 6.5 for a 260, or even up to 7mm for a 7mm/08. Do you use a lap and cutter as descibed by Clyde Baker, or something more machine like?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Muir View Post
    No, this one is one of the many thousands of stock 11mm military rifles that populated the New England states after WWII. When I was a kid the nearest "sporting goods" store had a barrel full of greasy, new, 11mm Mausers that could be had for $15 with two boxes of surplus, black powder 11MM ammo. For $18 the shop would substitute a box of Canadian "Dominion" brand sporting ammunition for the two boxes of surplus ammo. Oddly, the state I lived in (Massachusetts) would only allow shotgun for deer so I can't imagine where these guys were using these Mausers as cheap hunting rifles. Probably in Vermont, a couple of hours north.

    This Mauser is really fine. Some very minor patchiness to the bluing on the barrel and a few handling nicks in the stock, but otherwise it's an unfired, 1888 dated Spandau. I currently load and shoot 11mm. I have a 71/84 sporting rifle with a 6 shot magazine and my son has a 1871 Mauser Military single shot. Both are very accurate. I have a small supply of Dominion brass but I also have brass formed from 348 Winchester brass (lathe turned rims) that works quite well. I use a .446" RCBS cast bullet. I have read in places that the Model 1871 had a .451" groove diameter but this is not so with my son's rifle.~Muir
    Any chance of posting some pics of these rifles, I'm pretty ignorant of the terms and models quoted , but would love to see some of the rifles and see your finnished work

  6. #6
    Sure! I had to have them shipped to me. The first (the 1895 Winchester) should arrive in a week or so.~Muir

  7. #7
    Sorry to hear that Muir. Good about the Mauser though.

  8. #8
    That's OK. It was still cheap enough so that I'd have bought it anyhow: I've not seen a Model 1895 for less than $800 in a very long time. I'm thinking of having the barrel over-stamped "32 US GOV'T 06"! Another option I was considering was to have a 35 caliber barrel fitted to .358 Winchester. I need to think on that one.~Muir

  9. #9
    just wondering muir, how many rifles in total do you have. i bet there have been many an interesting conversation in your gun room when mates are over.

    regards
    keith

  10. #10
    I stalked for a fellow who - during my time of stalking on his annual visits, saw his lovely old Mannlicher Shoneur 6.5mm lose acuracy - the afore discussed problem of a couple of shots fairly accurate then the rest spreading.

    We discussed it at length and his decision was that he just wanted readily available ammo. to fit his magazine with the least problems possible, so the idea came up that .243 might be the answer.
    Campbell and Thompson did the work and that lovely old satiny rotary magazine now delivers .243 instead of 6,5.

    Pragmatism or sacrilege ? He just loves that rifle and the new calibre allows him to carry on using it with factory fodder without difficulties in locating cartridges.

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