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Thread: .243 and loads

  1. #1

    .243 and loads

    I have been doing some reading and seeing that some people use the Dippers.

    Now i am confused.

    I am reloading .243 with a 55Grain Nos BT Bullet and have been putting in 41grain of Varget as my starting load. Well 41 grains is 3 cc of power how can the 2.8 dipper be used as well surly this is far to inaccurate ?

    Looking down the data chart it say use the 2.8 dipper for quite a lot of the charges even through the weight are different.

    Can any one shed some light on this... Or is this the black art of loading ?

    Pete

  2. #2
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    i wouldnt even go their mate, far to inaccurate
    Quote Originally Posted by pg2008 View Post
    I have been doing some reading and seeing that some people use the Dippers.

    Now i am confused.

    I am reloading .243 with a 55Grain Nos BT Bullet and have been putting in 41grain of Varget as my starting load. Well 41 grains is 3 cc of power how can the 2.8 dipper be used as well surly this is far to inaccurate ?

    Looking down the data chart it say use the 2.8 dipper for quite a lot of the charges even through the weight are different.

    Can any one shed some light on this... Or is this the black art of loading ?

    Pete

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by calmac View Post
    i wouldnt even go their mate, far to inaccurate
    Ever done it? I'm guessing not!

    Pete: This is a fine way to load if you choose it. It does take some practice (as does using a dispensing measure) but the results are quite good. I loaded H414 using dippers in my daughters 243 Winchester Model 70 and she shot sub MOA with it. I have a .222 that I load regularly with dippers: Half MOA. My new 8x57 loading IMR 4350 using dippers is giving MOA. I could go on and on... I often make custom dippers from cartridge cases sawed then filed to length with a wire handle epoxied or soldered into place. With practice you can become quite accurate in your scooping.

    As to the volume of 2.8CC delivering different weights with different powders, well, a cubic foot of feathers weighs less than a cubic foot of sand. Powders have different densities, that's all. Nothing dark about it. ~Muir

    PS: Darned near forgot! Shot my future son-in-law's HOWA 30-06 using cartridges loaded with a Lee Loader and dippers of IMR 4350 and 180 grain bullets last week. Three quarter inch groups at 100M.
    Last edited by Muir; 21-07-2010 at 00:23.

  4. #4
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    hey calm your self down !! am i getting this wrong ?? if i am i stand forgiven.. "dipper" i take it are the wee not so accurate measuring cups to aid in loading scales with powder???
    Quote Originally Posted by Muir View Post
    Ever done it? I'm guessing not!

    Pete: This is a fine way to load if you choose it. It does take some practice (as does using a dispensing measure) but the results are quite good. I loaded H414 using dippers in my daughters 243 Winchester Model 70 and she shot sub MOA with it. I have a .222 that I load regularly with dippers: Half MOA. My new 8x57 loading IMR 4350 using dippers is giving MOA. I could go on and on... I often make custom dippers from cartridge cases sawed then filed to length with a wire handle epoxied or soldered into place. With practice you can become quite accurate in your scooping.

    As to the volume of 2.8CC delivering different weights with different powders, well, a cubic foot of feathers weighs less than a cubic foot of sand. Powders have different densities, that's all. Nothing dark about it. ~Muir

    PS: Darned near forgot! Shot my future son-in-law's HOWA 30-06 using cartridges loaded with a Lee Loader and dippers of IMR 4350 and 180 grain bullets last week. Three quarter inch groups at 100M.

  5. #5
    I'm not riled up. Relax. "Dippers" can be used to load scales but they are designed to throw a volumetric measure of powder into a case. Lee makes a large set along with a chart for volumes of various powders. The original intent was to have a dipper you can use to measure powder for your loads. Lee includes a dipper with most die sets, along with appropriate data as to what charge the dipper measures and what velocity you will get. Forgive me if I seemed short but I have seen so many people decry this method because it isn't "precise" when in reality, it is "precise enough" for most loads that aren't edging maximum.

    I love dippers as they make powder dispensing fast and I encourage people to try them if they have the mind. I mentioned in my post that I shot my future son-in-law's HOWA 30-06 with rounds loaded with a Lee Classic Loader and charged with the accompanying dipper. I was loading and shooting five rounds at a time and I could load 5 cartridges in the time it took my companions to set up a row of bowling pins to shoot with their revolvers. With this set you tap the case into a die with a mallet, and tap it out again after sizing. I was making a completed round every 1.5 minutes! The "dipper" was the speed demon in that operation~ Muir

  6. #6
    In regard to how accurate loads can be with dippers, I have been using dippers for a long time, but just instead of using a bench mounted charge thrower, I can say in support that with constant use, very consistent charges can be delivered, I know this because the dippers are tipped onto a digital scale, (a good one intended for reloaders), always within a tenth of a grain either way, just care with a view to scooping in the same manner each time so that "packing" the dipper does not occur.
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  7. #7
    I use the dipper/trickle method as for my 243 loads the dipper that came with my dies always gets me to within a grain or so of my load then i just trickle the rest in.

  8. #8
    Thank you all for that information.. I think i can see that it is a process that i need to find my own level in... All info taken on board.

    Cheers

  9. #9
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    was only jesting their muir, so thats what they call them i never new that i used tthem they give you a near as dam it start so your 95% their, then i used powder trickler to get it bang on...
    Quote Originally Posted by Muir View Post
    I'm not riled up. Relax. "Dippers" can be used to load scales but they are designed to throw a volumetric measure of powder into a case. Lee makes a large set along with a chart for volumes of various powders. The original intent was to have a dipper you can use to measure powder for your loads. Lee includes a dipper with most die sets, along with appropriate data as to what charge the dipper measures and what velocity you will get. Forgive me if I seemed short but I have seen so many people decry this method because it isn't "precise" when in reality, it is "precise enough" for most loads that aren't edging maximum.

    I love dippers as they make powder dispensing fast and I encourage people to try them if they have the mind. I mentioned in my post that I shot my future son-in-law's HOWA 30-06 with rounds loaded with a Lee Classic Loader and charged with the accompanying dipper. I was loading and shooting five rounds at a time and I could load 5 cartridges in the time it took my companions to set up a row of bowling pins to shoot with their revolvers. With this set you tap the case into a die with a mallet, and tap it out again after sizing. I was making a completed round every 1.5 minutes! The "dipper" was the speed demon in that operation~ Muir

  10. #10
    In the thread dealing with a beginner asking about where he should begin in .308 reloading equipment and advice, Muir recommended the Lee reloading kit which can be used in the field - with a mallet. It's about 4" wide X 6" long and an inch deep.

    The powder scoop/meaure included in the kit is the dipper being mentioned. You get practise in scooping up a clean and level measure and off you go. Job done.

    It sounds odd - I know - but it DOES work, and very well too. I used these kits in two sizes and my old reloading mentor used one in .270, and they produced amazing results.

    Calmac, I can see that your concern is safety and accuracy. That's to your credit. Pride in being right comes a long way behind getting anyone hurt.
    However, in this case there's no need for any worry at all, and if the word of the older codgers is still a question, then think about Lee and the litigation it would involve if they were to be the cause of harm to any of the public ?

    They just could not afford it.

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