Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Ivory

  1. #1
    Regular Poster buck52's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    England, a large country south of the Scottish Border
    Posts
    493

    Ivory

    Someone I know has a chess set, it is made of Ivory & ebony and is about 30 years old.
    They are concerned that it may be illegal due to the banning of ivory products

    They have an export certificate from a dealer in Malawi dated 20/05/1980 for the board & 06/06/80 for the pieces when they bought it, the certificate even has the tusk number.

    I wondered if anyone knew the rules as they are today, ie, is it illegal or can they sell it?

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by buck52 View Post
    Someone I know has a chess set, it is made of Ivory & ebony and is about 30 years old.
    They are concerned that it may be illegal due to the banning of ivory products

    They have an export certificate from a dealer in Malawi dated 20/05/1980 for the board & 06/06/80 for the pieces when they bought it, the certificate even has the tusk number.

    I wondered if anyone knew the rules as they are today, ie, is it illegal or can they sell it?
    I don't know. But a quick telephone call to the UK branch of CITES will answer their question. The people there are extremely helpful. Cheers.

  3. #3
    I don't think it's illegal to own ivory, just to import it or sell it (unless it's a verifiable antique).

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by csl View Post
    I don't think it's illegal to own ivory, just to import it or sell it (unless it's a verifiable antique).
    I think CSL is right here. If you are going to the Gamefair you could ask at the National Wildlife Crime Units stand. In situations like this the authorities are usually very happy to help genuine people stay on the right side of the law. JC

  5. #5
    I think you may find Ivory trading was banned in the fifties and therefore a call to CITIES should answer your problems. A numbered tusk may attempt to indicate legitimacy but I would have my doubts

  6. #6
    I would just keep my mouth shut and not risk stiring up a load of hassle, they sell very well at the antique fairs I have seen several recently they make a few hundred quid if they are nice.
    We have a really well carved antique one a friend who deals in chess sets got it me at a bargain price from a skint client

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Rangefinder View Post
    I think you may find Ivory trading was banned in the fifties and therefore a call to CITIES should answer your problems. A numbered tusk may attempt to indicate legitimacy but I would have my doubts
    i agree, mind if you ring them tell them a friend has xyz they say its illegal bang you have to tell them where and who or you are then breaking the law too

  8. #8
    Regular Poster
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    dumfries & galloway
    Posts
    360
    Blog Entries
    1
    check mate
    Quote Originally Posted by centralbeltstalker View Post
    i agree, mind if you ring them tell them a friend has xyz they say its illegal bang you have to tell them where and who or you are then breaking the law too

  9. #9
    Here you go:

    Animal Health

    You do not need any certificate issued by us simply to possess an Annex A CITES specimen or to give it away.
    You only need a certificate if specimens are to be used for commercial purposes.
    You must not buy, sell, offer to sell, use or display for commercial purposes including on the Internet, any Annex A specimens unless:

    • a valid SSC Article 10 Certificate has been issued for the specimen.
    • a valid TSC Article 10 Certificate has been issued with your name on it for the specimen you intend to sell.
    • an import permit with a special condition has been issued allowing the first sale of the specimen(s) by the person named on that import permit. This condition will allow sale only by that person. The certificate may only be used once so if you intend to sell the specimens separately to more than one person you will need additional certificates. Once all the specimens have been sold you must return your copy of the permit to us. Each live specimen must be marked in accordance with the regulation
    • Before you buy a specimen, you must make sure that it has a valid certificate or import permit and that if necessary you apply for another certificate, a TSC, if you want to resell it or use it commercially in any way, including breeding from it.

    There are some exceptions to these rules. These relate to:

    • antique specimens (that is, worked specimens acquired before 1st June 1947);
    • specimens of certain bird species (or hybrids of them) that have been bred in captivity and that are listed in the Annex to this note; or
    • specimens of certain plant species that have been grown artificially.
    So, not illegal to own. If it was carved before 1947 you can sell, otherwise you need a certificate from DEFRA.

  10. #10
    Regular Poster
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Galloway south west scotland
    Posts
    490
    It is not ileagal as long as it has recorded/ certified history. One of my friends had the opetunity to hunt elephant and went about getting all the permits before he sett of, one lady asked for the elephants registation number and where it was living and did it have a name! I kid you not, he soted out the paper work went overseas and hunted and brought back his trophy's, so as long as you have the paper trail and history you can still bring ivory into the country.

    Dry Powder.

    Barry

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •