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Thread: Nikko Stirling

  1. #1

    Nikko Stirling

    Has anybody any experience with this make of scope. I was browsing for a different scope with good zoom and this seems to fit the bill, without frightening the wallet. Its for steyr .308.

  2. #2
    If it fits your budget then its as good as you will get in that price range.

    I would try and spend a few more pounds though. It really is worth it.
    There is a place on this planet for all of God's creatures, right next to my tatties and gravy!!!

  3. #3

    Why?

    [QUOTE=Dan Gliballs;126380]If it fits your budget then its as good as you will get in that price range.

    I would try and spend a few more pounds though. It really is worth it.
    You have not said why it is worth spending a few more pounds. Is it because of illuminated reticle,or better illumination at dawn/dusk. I need to know the exact implications of spending precious pounds. Thanks , Ed.

  4. #4
    Hi Eddie its not so much about the bells and whistles but more about the quality of the glass mate.

  5. #5
    there not to bad i have a 4-14x44 milldot on a cz.22 .i had it on a 243 for a bit with out problems .there about the best in that price range .

  6. #6
    I have a Nikko Stirling Gold Crown 3 - 9 on my 308. Not a bad scope and you can get them quite cheaply if you look around. Mine came as part of a kit though and I will be upgrading it when funds allow but probably no point until I can afford some decent European glass such as IOR or 2nd hand Swaro.

  7. #7
    Uhuh ! I'm going to get my head in my hands here ! I believe that the cheaper range of scopes are fine on relatively 'punch-free' calibres. I have had several different types in that price range on .22 centrefires - up to .222 - without problems.
    In my earlier years of 'scope usage when Nikko were in vogue, I used them on .243 and they were fine - then suddenly the zero would go off and the reticule would be found collapsed although they didn't get knocked about. (But then - time has passed and they might be a bit more robust now).
    It all depends on your budget.

    A piece of advice given to me - years ago - by a well-known and experienced writer on Roe, was buy a rifle with a decent barrel and a set of well fixed or machined scope dovetails, then spend the same amount or more on a scope sight.

    I'd go for Peccar or Docter or something around that range if you can stretch to it. They are usualy tough old scopes.

    I've spent what money I could on various 'budget' binos and other optical aids through the years, but now wish that I had bitten the bullet and gone-for-broke in order to get the best possible. They last longer and are generaly kinder on the eyes.

    As for variable power. I'd definitely forget anything like that in the budget line of scopes or there will come a point where it will be 'Tears before bedtime'.
    Opinions often differ according to unknown circumstances.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    You have not said why it is worth spending a few more pounds. Is it because of illuminated reticle,or better illumination at dawn/dusk. I need to know the exact implications of spending precious pounds. Thanks , Ed.
    When you buy optics it really is a case of "you get what you pay for", cheap scopes use cheap glass so the optical quality of the scope isnt as good as the higher priced items.

    When you go to a shop to buy a scope the shop keeper usually asks you to take it outside and have a look up the High Street, in that situation it is hard, to the untrained eye to tell MUCH of a difference between the higher and lower ranges, it is not until you get them out in "the field" that the expensive ones REALLY do come into their own.

    Secondly the higher quality items really do stand the test of time and if they dont they are usually repaired/replaced FOC.

    Dont worry about variable magnification/illuminated reticules/twin carbs ect, a good quality fixed mag scope will see you right until you feel that you NEED the gizmos (which you never will NEED)

    If you dont want to go all out on items like Swarovski/Zeiss then a good middle of the road scope to consider would be the Leupold, a wide range at decent dosh.

    Sorry if im rambling on, whisky olympics tonight
    There is a place on this planet for all of God's creatures, right next to my tatties and gravy!!!

  9. #9
    It's all good advice on this thread. Basically set your budget and buy the best you can afford. My birding scope is a swaro (telescope that is..... not a riflescope!). it was my first scope, cost the better part of 2k and we have never regretted buying it. I would be hard pushe to justify spending that on a riflescope though...... at least to my wife if not to myself!

    Firstly decide on what you will be using the rifle for. If it will be solely in the field then a fixed focal length will be fine. If you will be doing range work as well then a variable focal length may be useful. My Nikko is a 3-9 mag but to be honest it starts to lose clarity above 6x so I tend to leave it on 6. But using 6x mag on a 600 yard range makes it a little difficult to see where you are scoring on the target. A good quality fixed focal length (say 6x or 8x) would give me a better view. Last time at Hythe I used a friends Remmy with a Fox 6-24x scope and it was very hazy ... like heat haze. In fact I thought it was heat haze until I looked through mine which was crystal clear. A bit of parralax adjustment made it a little better but still nowhere near as clear as mine.

    With a variable mag always knock off the top end of the range as with most scopes my friends have it is never usable (they are all budget scopes).

    You really do get what you pay for. My last pair of bins were Hawkes. I had them about 6 weeks before I traded them in for Nikon Monarch.

    As I do range work (mostly range work at the moment - I only got my FAC this year) I will probably go for a variable mag when I change..... possibley IOR or Meopta as I hear good things about them, although I think a s&b 6x scope would give better clarity than my 3x9 so I suppose it depends on how long I can wait.

    As far as quality goes I consider my NS disposable. It costs a lot less than european glass and if it breaks I will go get another one.... European glass would be repeaired... although probably wouldn't break in the first place.

    Swaro aftersales service is second to none and to me is a reason for choosing it above Zeiss etc so if money is available that is what I would go for.

    One thing to remember is that not all budget scopes are equal.... I have a cheaper Nikko on my 22 and on a 25 yard indoor range I have to get someone to spot for me. It is good enough to shoot at the target but not good at seeing the holes I have made in the paper!!!

    Ok.... I am rambling now... but it is Sunday morning!

    Hope this helps!

  10. #10
    Ive allway thought of the Niko Stirling scopes as suitable for the .22. I have one on my .22
    Would go for something better on a fullbore rifle though.

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