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Thread: bullet weights ?

  1. #1

    bullet weights ?

    What is the limiting factor for the size of bullet for any particular calibre ?
    For arguements sake a .243 ?What is the largest size of bullet and why ?


    The answer is probably staring at me straight in the face ?but I cant seem to see it .

  2. #2
    Hi.
    .243 Win + .243 AI Cartridge Guide has a good photo part way down the article. I currently have loads for 105 AMax, 107 SMK and have tried and given up on 108gr Bergers. However there are heavier bullets available for the .243 Win and the picture shows a 115gr DTAC. You have asked some hard questions. Brian Litz's book would seem to be one good read on this topic.
    Products
    Rgds JCS

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by jcampbellsmith View Post
    Hi.
    .243 Win + .243 AI Cartridge Guide has a good photo part way down the article. I currently have loads for 105 AMax, 107 SMK and have tried and given up on 108gr Bergers. However there are heavier bullets available for the .243 Win and the picture shows a 115gr DTAC. You have asked some hard questions. Brian Litz's book would seem to be one good read on this topic.
    Products
    Rgds JCS
    Thanks JCS,
    Just read most of what seemed WAYYY! over my head ! hahahaha
    I have even had to take a couple of paracetamol and sit down with a cup of tea .
    Wish I,d never asked ? lolol

    Thanks again
    George

  4. #4
    George
    The evolution of the rifle is a fascinating subject. I hope somebody on the forum can recommend a good book that charts the development of rifles and their bullets. I find the topic fascinating. In Turin I visited the following Armoury.
    Palazzo Reale Armeria Reale in Turin - Stay.com
    Some of the technology we use has been around a very long time.
    Regards
    JCS

  5. #5
    The twist rate of your barrel will determine the weight of the bullet it can stabilise

    Nell

  6. #6
    Not always always the case nell , certainly in my experience
    I have a sako 85 in .243 which will not entertain a 100gr bullet , but the steyr ssg loves em. both 1-10 twist.
    Never have fathomed that one out . Brough

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Brough View Post
    Not always always the case nell , certainly in my experience
    I have a sako 85 in .243 which will not entertain a 100gr bullet , but the steyr ssg loves em. both 1-10 twist.
    Never have fathomed that one out . Brough
    Would it be safer to say a rule of thumb then???

    I have to agree that rules dont always apply, my 6mmbr 12 twist should not stabalise anything heavier than 80gr(or so i was told) i loaded some 87grainers and shot a .1 5 shot group, happy days..

    Nell

  8. #8
    that is the very reason I steered away from the .243/6mm in the first place. For some unbeknown reason they can be very fussy on projectiles. A friend brought his girlfriend a beautiful Ruger No1B in .243. With the Speer 85 grain bullet it would rip out one tiny little bug sized hole for five shots. A 100 grain bullet it was lucky to put them onto a dinner plate at 100 yards . It's not only twist rate as related in the Greenhill formula but also the altitude also makes a difference as a friend has just reported on another site. he has been playing with 60 grain .22 L/R ammunition from Aquila and he lives almost at sea level. His friends who live at around 8000 ft in Colorado find it's shoots well in most of their rifles but to get his to stabilise he needs a special custom dast twist barrel. Temp can also effect it. Internal ballistics seem more akin to Voodo than science at times.

    Oh i know have both a .243 adn a 6mm Rem chambered rifle .

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Brithunter View Post
    that is the very reason I steered away from the .243/6mm in the first place. For some unbeknown reason they can be very fussy on projectiles. A friend brought his girlfriend a beautiful Ruger No1B in .243. With the Speer 85 grain bullet it would rip out one tiny little bug sized hole for five shots. A 100 grain bullet it was lucky to put them onto a dinner plate at 100 yards . It's not only twist rate as related in the Greenhill formula but also the altitude also makes a difference as a friend has just reported on another site. he has been playing with 60 grain .22 L/R ammunition from Aquila and he lives almost at sea level. His friends who live at around 8000 ft in Colorado find it's shoots well in most of their rifles but to get his to stabilise he needs a special custom dast twist barrel. Temp can also effect it. Internal ballistics seem more akin to Voodo than science at times.

    Oh i know have both a .243 adn a 6mm Rem chambered rifle .
    I love that Aguila 60 grain Sub Sonic Sniper! I did much of the prototype testing when they went ot hat bullet and lube configuration and found it very accurate in 1-16" twist guns out to 25M. After that however, I found no 1-16" twist rifle out of twenty or so weapons that would stabilize the l-o-n-g bullet out to 50M with a muzzle velocity of 960 fps. I don't know how far that Floridian was shooting at but it wasn't much farther than 30M of he had no stabilization problems. The Colorado man is more realistic: The bullet was designed for a 1:9" twist Poseidon rifle built with calibrated optics for law enforcement. (Aguila gave one each to my partner and I tho they are still sitting in a safe in Texas.) In Colorado the distance might be greater?? hence the difference in twist needs between the two men?

    As the bullet weight issue, it is a matter of length -as the Greenhill formula indicates. The existence of "Ballistic Tips" is owed to this. The makers could produce a long, high ballistic coeffecient bullet without adding appreciable weight... the normal by-product of increasing BC.**~Muir

    (** And you thought that plastic tip had something to do with expansion!)

  10. #10
    Actually, I'm the fellow at sea level (in Alaska not Florida) using the SSS, and range wasn't the issue. I tried the bullet in about a dozen different .22 rifles I own, and none of them would stabilize that bullet at 10 feet, let alone 25 yards. The air at sea level is "thick", and the temperature at which I commonly shoot is rarely above 60 Fahrenheit. In Colorado, the air is "thin" and the temperature was closer to 70. (I was also shooting in CO, but not 'til I had a 1:9 twist barrel.) Both those factors matter when one is faced with being on the edge of gyroscopic stability. Small changes in velocity and or temperature can have dramatic effects on gyroscopic stability.

    Because I fell in love with that bullet, I bought a Volquartsen barrel for my 10/22 with a 1:9 twist. Now I shoot nice tiny groups out to 50 yards with no sweat.

    I'm curious about how you got to be in on the testing of that bullet. Especially what the thinking was that caused a manufacturer to make it.

    Paul

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