Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: I'm now officially qualified to shoot deer!

  1. #1

    I'm now officially qualified to shoot deer!

    I've just passed the Danish 'rifle test' which means that I'm now allowed to hunt with full bore rifles.

    It's not as if the test is particularly difficult, but I was quite nervous anyway!

    The test is 6 shots on a Roe buck target at 100m. 5 out of the 6 must be within the defined kill zone (a 20cm circle). Obviously this should be no problem, but even so two out of the six I shot with (there were over 60 shooters in total) failed the test.

    You can see a video showing what the test is like here: Video om riffeljagt - Skov- og Naturstyrelsen

    Click on the video titled 'Afsnit 4:Riffelprøven' The video is a couple of years old and the kill zone is no longer marked in white, which is okay as I've yet to see a roe with a 20cm white circle on it's side.

    Regards
    T_T

  2. #2
    Well done T_T.

    I didn't understand a word of that video, but a lovely looking young lady and she made the perfect choice and purchased the best rifle in the shop!!

    T

  3. #3
    Account Suspended
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Bonnie Scotland
    Posts
    3,447
    Quote Originally Posted by thomas View Post
    Well done T_T.

    I didn't understand a word of that video, but a lovely looking young lady and she made the perfect choice and purchased the best rifle in the shop!!

    T
    Same here. Wish that series of videos came with subtitles. Got that it was a Sauer 202, fluted barrel (Elegance?) Apel swing offs and a Swarovski scope. Couldn't work out which calibre or which spec scope though.

  4. #4
    Looked like a .308 to me in the loading block on the test. However surely you check the bore by looking from the breech not down the Muzzle............. *groan*

    Oh did you notice the hard closing of the bolt on the .22 L/R?

    AND she nearly ended up with her fingers in the trigger guard whilst closing the bolt during her dry firing practice at home. The chappie next to her was using a Mauser based rifle.. Konnesburg? perhaps?

    Also you notice the rifle make grade etc but did you noticed the damage to the buttstock. Looked like a row of gouges to me in it.

    Oh FYI my mentors brought a Sauer 202 in 7x64 and finally gave up on it. Grouping was very poor. They even put a new barrel on it when it was returned and it was still poor. He spent around £400 on every ammo type he could find and even hand loads. Best it would do was 3" at 100 yards. He chopped it in for a Blaser R93 professional in 7x57. Just goes to show you the just because they're expensive does it mean you can't get a lemon. That's not the first I have seen with precision problems. Fulton's also had one and asked the guy who ran the British Snipers Club, yes he was a real ex-sniper and his son was a serving one too, to test it out. That would do a 6" pattern. Fulton's returned it to Sauer. I never heard the outcome. i only knew them from another club and our bookings often were the same times and just happened to walk into Fultons when it was being returned with the test targets..

  5. #5
    TT is the shooting test part of the Danish hunting test? I understood about half of what they were saying. Danish a very strange language. It sound like some one talking Swedish with a mouth full of porridge.
    I think I,ve been to that gun shop. They only show a small part of it in the video.
    Good luck with your hunting. You will be able to come to Sweden now and see what real hunting is about.

  6. #6
    Well done on passing the test TT, we have a very similar set up in Norway.

    I seem to get more nervous shooting the test than I do when I finally get the cross hairs on an animal.

    Happy hunting!
    Jonathan

    My Hunting Blog: click here


  7. #7
    Account Suspended
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Bonnie Scotland
    Posts
    3,447
    Got to love the way Scandinavian countries handle shooting sport. Maybe we could adopt more of their thinking over here. Are these courses and tests expensive to complete (i.e. How much does it cost to get your hunting qualification?) Who organises it all? ... Sorry if I'm asking questions everyone else already knows the answers to, but I don't~Tom

  8. #8
    Hi Tamus,

    I'll step in with the Norwegian way of things.

    Before you can purchase a firearm for hunting in Norway you have to sit a hunting exam, this is a multiple choice exam consisting of 50 questions covering all aspects from hunting situations (picture questions), species identification (picture questions), wild game and hunting laws, weapons and ammunition etc. To pass this test you need to get a minimum of 40 correct. There are courses and books avalibale for purchase to help you with this and you only need to pass this exam once.

    Once passed, you then apply to the police for the weapon permits in the calibers you require (£80 for first timers, £40 for further additions). If you have cleared the background check from the police, you then receive the weapons permit enabling you to go out and purchase the caliber(s) of your choice. Recent legislation has limited the number of fireams to 6 per hunter and you usually have one year to puchase the weapon from the time the permit was received.

    Every year, each hunter wanting to hunt large game, (roe deer and upwards in size) needs to pass a shooting test with each of the hunting rifles they intend to use. The test consists of 5 shots with hunting ammunition at a roe deer shaped target at 100 meters where you have to get 5 within the kill zone (not shown on the deer). The shooting test can be taken prone, sitting or standing, the bench is not permitted. The tests are usually carried out on electronic targets and you can only see the results of your shooting at the end of the test. To be eligible to take the test you must have shot a minimum of 30 shots prior that year, for example target shooting, sighting in, competitions etc. for which you can get a paper slip documenting your shots taken. The cost of the test is around £10-15 depending on whether or not you are a member of the range where you are taking the test. On passing the hunter receives an official stamp in his hunting permit with the details of his rifle(s) and caliber etc. which have now been approved for large game hunting. The test takes place at local shooting ranges throughout the country and is managed by the staff (fellow hunters and shooters).

    Each hunter is also requred to purchase a huntig permit each year, this costs approx. £35 if you want to hunt large game (moose, reindeer and red deer), the price is lower for roe deer and the smaller species £28.



    Quote Originally Posted by Tamus View Post
    Got to love the way Scandinavian countries handle shooting sport. Maybe we could adopt more of their thinking over here. Are these courses and tests expensive to complete (i.e. How much does it cost to get your hunting qualification?) Who organises it all? ... Sorry if I'm asking questions everyone else already knows the answers to, but I don't~Tom
    Last edited by Jonher; 05-09-2010 at 10:25.
    Jonathan

    My Hunting Blog: click here


  9. #9
    Account Suspended
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Bonnie Scotland
    Posts
    3,447
    Thanks for that Jonher. I take it Denmark, Sweden, Finland are similar, is that right? Where do you sit the hunting exam? i.e. Who does the initial testing, is it all done within local clubs, or what? ....6 Guns!! Does that include rifles and shotguns, or what?
    Is this what the future holds for us?
    Last edited by Tamus; 05-09-2010 at 11:01. Reason: Shpelling... Ooops

  10. #10
    Very interesting post Jonathan! It sounds like a very similar set-up to here in Denmark. The hunting test here is 40 multiple choice questions as well as a practical test involving demonstrating safe weapon handling in the field and while firing at clays, plus range estimation with quarry silhouettes. The cost of the course varies from 150 to 500 pounds depending who is holding it, plus the course handbook which costs about 50. I took mine quite cheaply through my local hunting club. It also costs about 24 pounds to take the test. It then costs about 55 pounds per year for a hunting licence.

    After passing the hunting test shotguns and rimfire rifles can be bought and used for hunting. Centrefire rifles can be bought and used to practice for the rifle test. Rifles require a licence from the police which costs 80 pounds for the first and 40 for each subsequent rifle. Licences are specific to each rifle rather that having slots for each calibre. There are at present no real limits to how many you can have, but more security is required if you have more 20 weapons. Semi automatic rifles which have a capacity of more than two shots can only be obtained for use while hunting abroad.

    The rifle test costs around 15 pounds to take, and can be taken using any rifle (which you have a licence for!) and is legal for roe.
    Both the hunting test and the rifle test are administered by Skov og Naturstyrelsen (the equivalent of the Forestry Commision).

Similar Threads

  1. Are they qualified
    By Mannlicher_Stu in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 19-07-2010, 22:55
  2. Summer is officially here
    By Emdoc in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 07-05-2010, 09:07
  3. Worst location you chose to shoot a deer in
    By KevinF in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 23-03-2010, 22:32
  4. Shoot your deer - dont try to 'rope' them !
    By 325wsm in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 25-11-2008, 21:54
  5. How many wild Deer on average do you shoot a Month?
    By 300wsm in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 13-04-2008, 20:49

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •