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Thread: Kamado Smokers

  1. #1

    Kamado Smokers

    I recently purchased a 2nd hand ceramic Japanese Kamado grill/smoker/oven. Anybody here use one? I have a 13 pound beef brisket smoking now that has been going steady for the last 12 hours without refilling the charcoal. I am told that with a 10 pound load of natural charcoal this will burn at 200 deg/F for 43 hours, continuously. From what I have seen so far this is correct. To me, this is a huge improvement over having to nurse the fire and temperature for 12 to 20 hours, and well worth the price of the grill. (new about $800US here for a good one) I have about 2 hours left on my brisket having started it before bed last night. I expect good (and tasty!) results. I want to do a venison roast wrapped in bacon next weekend. ~Muir

    Addendum: Ran my smoker for 20 hours straight and still have charcoal left to burn next time. I even did a rack of ribs along with the brisket. Excellent. Love this thing.~M
    Last edited by Muir; 13-09-2010 at 12:46.

  2. #2
    Muir, they are supposed to be the dogs dangalies!, I can't afford one as I think they are about 1500 in U.K. There are a few similar makes including the Big green egg, I think they have lots of recipes on their site?

    I am very jealous!

  3. #3
    Deer Man,

    GBP 650 new here in UK.

    Stan

  4. #4
    These are where I first saw them Kamado - gas charcoal and electric barbecue the Kamado joe does look good though!

  5. #5
    Mine is an old Japanese-made Kamado brought over here by a serviceman, I'm sure. It is exactly the size of "The Big Green Egg" large model. I actually bought it at a 2nd Hand store marked as a garden stove(?) and priced at $40 US. They are all based on the same basic design, I think. I use mine with natural charcoal and it is fabulous. There is no facility for gas. I have an idea about a roast made from a whitetail doe, wrapped in bacon, and cooked long and slow. About 6 hours I think. I bought some smoking chips made from the barrels at the Jack Daniels Bourbon distillery... That should give it a distinctive taste!! ~Muir

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Muir View Post
    Mine is an old Japanese-made Kamado brought over here by a serviceman, I'm sure. It is exactly the size of "The Big Green Egg" large model. I actually bought it at a 2nd Hand store marked as a garden stove(?) and priced at $40 US. They are all based on the same basic design, I think. I use mine with natural charcoal and it is fabulous. There is no facility for gas. I have an idea about a roast made from a whitetail doe, wrapped in bacon, and cooked long and slow. About 6 hours I think. I bought some smoking chips made from the barrels at the Jack Daniels Bourbon distillery... That should give it a distinctive taste!! ~Muir
    You are a bad man! Pulled pork, briskets, I am going to go now!

  7. #7
    This is good timing!

    I was looking to replace our sad looking BBQ and also thinking about getting going again with some smoking so the Kamado Joe looks like a good dual purpose job - albeit a bit pricey.

    One of the distributors is just up the road from me so I'll pop along for a look before committing myself http://www.hotsmoked.co.uk/ceramic-g...oe/cat_16.html

    As an aside, has anyone else tried smoking cheeses, garlic or even a tray of salt? When I last did, it was those items that got snaffled up by the family over the meat!

  8. #8
    I bought a block of Swiss Cheese to try smoking. How did you do yours?? I was thinking of using an indirect smoke: Funneling the smoke from the chimney though a few feet of aluminum flex duct (to cool it) and into a secondary chamber with the cheese in it. Any thoughts?~Muir

  9. #9
    I converted our old redundant outside privy into a cold smoker by sticking a chimney through the roof and using a galvanised garden 'leaf burner' to hold the smoking sawdust - sort of a dustbin with a chimney in the lid. (Maybe I should have mentioned that the 'throne' had been removed beforehand and all the walls and ceiling plastered and the floor screeded. ) Items to be smoked were placed on wire racks liberated from a supermarket. Wasn't very controllable and needed a fair bit of attention but the results were generally good.

    Cold smoking is obviously the way to go with items like cheese, garlic bulbs, hard boiled eggs etc. so your proposed method looks promising. I found that soft processed cheeses were better received and more popular so I bought things like the 'Bonbel Laughing Cow' supermarket cheeses by the box from the cash & carry very cheaply and used them. If you haven't already tried it then have a go at smoking a tray of sea salt - flakes are better than crystal - they add a smokey aroma to most foods and a little goes a long way. You can also use it with other spices to make interesting rubs for other products. Some recipes and ideas for smoked salt on this website: http://www.devonsmokehouse.com/
    Last edited by Orion; 14-09-2010 at 17:02.

  10. #10
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    What's the preferred type of wood chip to use? I fancy trying the Apple and/or Cherry but have only ever used Oak in the past.

    I've got Apple, Ash, Beech, Birch, Cherry and Wild-cherry (Gene), Oak, Poplar, Rowan and Sycamore... all trees. I've also got a selection of evergreens, but only the Juniper bushes ever struck me as having any potential.

    Any advice before I try the untried?

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