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Thread: Bleeding a deer

  1. #1

    Bleeding a deer

    Hello all

    i have read a few threads saying how the the shot deer was "bleed out" is this saying one of the main arturies was cut prior to the gralloch to expell the blood? or just expelling the blood from the shot deer via the gralloch.

    I normally H/L shoot deer and by the time i get to the shot deer (5-10mins) and start the gralloch the chest cavity is full of blood is there a need to still "bleed out"?

    i can see the need to bleed if the animal was still alive or head shot and you were there straight away as the heart would pump out the blood for you, but if the animal had been dead 5 mins plus the heart has stopped and cutting arturies would make no diffrence

    i look forward to the replies as this question has bugged me for some time , just on a lighter note the wife is working late tonight no school for me tomorrow the kids are all tucked up in bed i am nursing a good Rioja with beer chaser after a good venison dinner

    regards.....neil

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by griffshrek View Post
    I normally H/L shoot deer and by the time i get to the shot deer (5-10mins) and start the gralloch the chest cavity is full of blood
    There is the requirement to bleed the carcass. The blood is first to go off and needs to be bled out quickly. Th term doesn't relate to the animal bleading to death internally but removing the blood from the beast. Hope that helps.

  3. #3
    As a habitual chest-shooter, I find that 'bleeding out' is best accomplished by cutting the diaphragm after the gralloch and letting out the blood in there through the laparotomy.

    Under these circumstances, a hole through the front of the chest in the trad manner would really not help at all, and just allow more crud in during the drag.

  4. #4
    Treckle Tracker still a bit confussed buy you reply
    "The term doesn't relate to the animal bleading to death internally but removing the blood from the beast" are you saying remove the blood that has pooled in the chest cavity is the bleeding or cutting an arturie ?

    i normally carry out what Dalua has described ....neil

  5. #5
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    With a heart or lung shot the blood remains on the Heart side of the diaphram after removing the gralloch(Rumen and securing the anal tract and tying off the bladder),the next stage would be to circumnavigate the diaphram with your knife and remove the pluck consisting of the heart and lungs along with the tied of and secured gullet, during this process the blood contained within the cavity will be drained,
    It is also advisable to activate the rear legs as in a walking motion which will help eliminate excessive blood remaining in the carcass and capillary blood vessels.
    Try to place the carcass so the chest cavity is in a downward position for a period which also assists drainage
    Hope this Helps
    Stu
    Last edited by Mannlicher_Stu; 14-09-2010 at 20:42.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Mannlicher_Stu View Post
    It is also advisable to activate the rear legs as in a walking motion which will help eliminate excessive blood remaining in the carcass and capillary blood vessels.
    I have read a description of this in a textbook, but I have my doubts as to whether any more blood is actually expelled by doing this, bearing in mind that the blood in the chest is usually already considerably clotted. I've never done it myself.

  7. #7
    I cannot believe the OP and the replies so far no wonder people are given mentoring conditions

    These posts must be a spoof but it not April the 1st is it?

    Once the deer has been confirmed dead the deer NEEDS to be bled the best way to do this is by cutting the carteriods on both sides and then inserting the knife though the v created by the clavicals keep the knife parallel to the spine and cut the arteries above the heart. Apply pressure with you knee to the stomach this will in turn force the diaphram forward and assist with bleeding the animal.

    Doing it this with the animal suspended is easier put there are not always convenient trees.

    Following this method will save you from having a carcass that looks like it has been gralloched with either a blunt spoon or a chainsaw, bleeding though the diaphram is not something I would do as it bloodstains all the best cuts.

  8. #8
    I think if not left too long pumping the stomach in a forward motion to the diaphram with a knee can dislodge some clots and give a good bleed..

    Just been beaten to it..lol
    Last edited by pheasant sniper 1; 14-09-2010 at 21:03. Reason: sweep beat me
    Blessed be the sheeple for they shall inherit bugger all...

  9. #9
    Good explanation Sweep 6.5x55 I,m glad you were taught the same as me. But then again, over the years I,ve seen many a beast bled/gralloched in all sorts of ways, some not so hygienic. I suppose we,re all only as good as your teacher

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by sweep 6.5x55 View Post
    I cannot believe the OP and the replies so far no wonder people are given mentoring conditions
    Fortunately, it is not part of the remit of the Firearms Licensing Offices to base the grant, refusal or conditions of a FAC on the applicant's beliefs concerning the minutiae of the handling of deer carcasses.


    Quote Originally Posted by sweep 6.5x55 View Post
    Once the deer has been confirmed dead the deer NEEDS to be bled
    When I have killed a deer by shooting it through the chest, it is usually dead because it has been bled out into its chest, more or less. The blood obviously should be allowed out, and to make another hole or two in addition to the gralloching cut is simply, in my view, to risk more carcass contamination.

    Quote Originally Posted by sweep 6.5x55 View Post
    Following this method will save you from having a carcass that looks like it has been gralloched with either a blunt spoon or a chainsaw, bleeding though the diaphram is not something I would do as it bloodstains all the best cuts.
    I must say that I think my grallochs are quite elegant, and I have never noticed any inconvenience from 'bloodstained' meat resulting from transdiaphragmatic exsanguination.

    Different folk, different strokes, I guess!

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